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Restarting during rendering

Jul 3, 2012 7:59 PM

Hello,

 

I have a very bizarre issue. Up until several days ago my sytem ran beautifully. I had Vista 64 with MC5.5 and all of the apps, PPRO in particular ran borderline perfect. It was certainyl slow as my system has only 8Gigs and is bare minimum at best but it does meet the minimum system requirements.

 

Intel Core 2 Quad CPU

8GB

Asus Board

(Don't know what oter info you guys would need).

 

About 6 or 7 days ago I was prompted by Windows update that updates were available. I went ahead and installed the updates and when Windows was going through the reboot process during the process in which it configures the updates it never finished rebooting and wouldn't come back up.

 

I brought it down to a local computer shop and the guy there was able to boot it up and it appeared that all of the Windows updates had installed sucessfully. I got it home, ran CCleaner, doubled checked Windows update again and everything seemed to be running smoothly again.

 

I set up some files to encode in AME and my computer restarted during the encode. I was irritated but thougt maybe something happened like a switch on the power strip got hit or something (I wasn't present when the restart happened). So I restarted, set everything up again, started rendering again and it rebooted again while rendering. It kept doing this to me and I could not get a complete encode done. What's weird is everything else ran smoothly, cutting in PP was fine, it was only when I rendered.

 

I looked online for some possible solutions and I opened up the prompt and ran sfc/scannow and it did find an error which it said it repaired. Same result. I decided not to try to hunt down a ghost problem and I just did a clean install of the OS and in the process installed CS6.

 

CS6, PP in particular was running beautiful and then I set of a few sequences to render in AME and it restarted again. Since I did a clean install of the OS, I know it's not the Adobe apps doing it, I am suspicious of the Bios, It's weird because it only does it when rendering. Whether I export straight from PP or send to AME it restarts. I made it through a couple of short encodes without it restarting, it was about a 30 second sequence which took about 10 minutes to encode. Any sequences that are about several minutes or longer I can't make it through and my machine reboots.

 

As I said I know it's not the apps. Everthing started getting funky when I had the Windows update go awry, What do you think? Did my Bios or something get messed up?

 

I know this is most likely not an Adobe or PP problem, but seeing it happens only when encoding I am hoping that someone has an idea as I don't know where else to turn. I tried finding solutions online hoping not to bother you guys but just don't know where to go from here. I'm not that deep into the hardware end of it like a lot of you are.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read and any assitance would be greatly appreciated.

 

Shane

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 3, 2012 9:29 PM   in reply to Shane P

    >only does it when rendering. Whether I export

     

    Small point... rendering is when you hit the enter key for timeline playback operation... transcoding is when you export to a new file

     

    It sounds like your problem is during transcoding... which places a LOT of stress on the hardware, especially the CPU... which can cause overheating

     

    Crash/Restart may also be caused by corrupted drivers, which MAY be your problem

     

    Some reading, and troubleshooting steps (not all are specific to PPro)

     

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/772169

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/792580

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 4, 2012 3:07 AM   in reply to Shane P

    This is a hardware problem. Use Memtest86+ to stress test your memory and use Prime95 to stress test your system. Use HWMonitor or Speedfan to monitor your temps while running the Prime95 stress test. Let us know what your temps are.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 4, 2012 7:51 AM   in reply to Shane P

    During operations, a reboot is a BSOD (Blue Screen of Death), whether you see that, or not, will depend on the settings that you have applied, on errors.

     

    This ARTICLE addresses many of the common causes, and also has links to Harm's tools (they came from him), plus a few more, to help you troubleshoot the root issue(s) behind the BSOD.

     

    I agree that hardware is the most likely candidate, but also bad low-level drivers can cause what you observe. I would look to hardware first, and then to low-level drivers.

     

    Good luck, and I would address this problem ASAP.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 4, 2012 11:02 AM   in reply to Shane P

    When temps get above the max, protection circutry usually steps in, and one cannot reboot completely, until the temps fall to below the allowed limit. Sounds like Harm's first shot at this might be "right-on." Also, heat is at the top of the list, of possibilites.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 4, 2012 8:44 PM   in reply to Shane P

    Is that a sign a piece of hardware is starting to fail?

     

    I'd be concerned about the CPU shutting down at less than 80C myself.  But then, yours is quite old.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 4, 2012 10:02 PM   in reply to Shane P

    Shane,

     

    The thermal protection circuitry is apparently kicking in and causing the reboots. There is nothing in the BIOS or elsewhere to prevent that from happening. What may help is adding fans to your case to improve the airflow and to renew the thermal paste under the CPU cooler. If you don't have any cooling paste lying around, consider Coollaboratory Liquid Ultra, described in the Cooling panel here: Planning and building a new NLE system.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 5, 2012 9:02 AM   in reply to Shane P

    Keep your fingers X'ed, and maybe all will be OK.

     

    What happens often, is that regular editing stresses a machine, but only to a certain point. Then, Rendering, or Export, increases the load, and in several areas. It might be accessing RAM, above the norm, and hitting bad RAM, or it might increase the heat from the HDD's, or the CPU, or the GPU. It is in those times of stress, that weaknesses can be encountered, that lie dormant under normal loads.

     

    Good luck, and Harm DOES have some great tips on building, or buying, one's super editing machine.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 7, 2012 3:23 PM   in reply to Shane P

    Shane,

     

    When you have a moment, you might want to make note of anything in Harm's articles, that you did not fully understand. Just make a list. Post to the Adobe Premiere Hardware Forum, and I'll bet that Harm, and others, can fill in any blanks, and explain what is confusing.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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