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Bill T74
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1080p/60 video format

Jul 8, 2012 6:30 PM

I recently shot video using my Panasonic HDC-HS900 camcorder using the 1080p60 format.  I am using Adobe Premiere Elements 9.  I set up a new project, but didn't see a preset corresponding to 1080p 60.  I picked AVCHD Lite 720p60 and added one of the video files (an MTS file) to the project.  When I played back the video, it looked fine for a few seconds, but then became choppy and unwatchable.  My computer is about 4 years old.  It has an Intel dual core processor at 2.4 GHz and 4 GB RAM.

 

Any suggestions here?  Should I

 

1) Pick a different preset?

2) Convert my MTS file to a different format?  If so, what tool could I use for that?

3) Do some other option?  Hopefully my computer is powerful enough to do this, as I don't want to have to buy a new one.

 

Any help would be much appreciated.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 8, 2012 8:15 PM   in reply to Bill T74

    Did you read this previous discussion? - http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1033387

     

    There seems to be a mixed result with 1080p

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 4:58 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    As John says, Premiere Elements does not offer support for AVCHP 1080p.

     

    If you want to edit video from that camcorder in Premiere Elements, you will need to shoot it in 1080 60i.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 6:07 AM   in reply to Bill T74

    You can try to use it in a project set up for AVCHD 1080i. Just remember to render often (press Enter) whenever you see red lines above the clips on your timeline.

     

    If your system can handle the extra load, you may be able to do some basic work. But no guarantees. It's just not a format the program is designed to work with.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 7:56 AM   in reply to Bill T74

    >any way to convert

     

    Did your camera come with a software CD?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 9:17 AM   in reply to Bill T74

    I've been using PE10 for months edititing 1080p60 files from a near twin camcorder (HDC-SDT750) and a Sony HX9V.  I use a laptop that's a couple years old and has lots of memory.  I had no idea that 1080p60 was "not supported".  In fact, except for this forum, I can't find documentation that says it is not supported. 

     

    Bill T74 wrote, "  I ..... added one of the video files (an MTS file) to the project.  When I played back the video, it looked fine for a few seconds, but then became choppy and unwatchable."

        Don't worry about that.  The project preset is for real time viewing of your project.  The rendering by pressing <Enter> reads the original files and makes a temporary file used during editing.  It works the computer pretty hard because it tries to make it look like the final product.   The preset that counts is under the Share tab.  The share preset is where it is rendered again using all the markers you set in the project, to make a video usable and optimized for YouTube or your 55"TV.  And , it can take a long time.  In other words, the computer takes whatever time is necessary to read from your original footage one frame at a time and makes an entirely new video file that will play smoothly if played on the device it was intended for. 

     

    Bill T74 also asked, "  I picked AVCHD Lite 720p60  "

       That one works for me in PE10.  The render me red line does not show up in my time line when using 1080p60.  It might be because the frame rate is matched.  Setting the project preset at AVCHD1080i does create the red render me line.

     

    Then Bill T74 asked, " Do some other option?  Hopefully my computer is powerful enough to do this, as I don't want to have to buy a new one."  On another forum I've been following for a year it seems common for owners of the Pansonic 700/750/800/900 camcorders ignore the software that comes with it called HD Writer.  My version is 2.6 and yours is probably 3.0.  Its purpose is to make all the the Pansonic features usable, including 1080p60.  The manual, included on the disk, is over 130 pages.  You have to read, or at least scan it, to figure out what it can do.  Included is the ability to trim clips, split clips, join clips, add titles, add transitions and make movies.  It does that while preserving the original quality of the video. It will put the final vidoe on a Blu-Ray disc, a BD playable AVCHD Disk (up to about 30 minutes), a DVD, upload to YouTube or most anything you might want.  It does not have the wonderful selection of color controls, effects and audio tools that PE has.

     

    HD Writer has one major requirement.  It must be used to transfer files from your camera to your computer.  The reason is that each .m2ts file the camera makes, three more tiny files are made with it that include things for HD Writer.  If you have already copied your files to your computer, HD Writer will be useless to you. 

     

    If you can't get Premier Elements to work on your 1080p60 files, HD Writer will convert it to an AVCHD 1.0 format that may work better.  In other words a 1920x1080p60 file can covert to 1920x1080i30 file.  ( In ver 2.6 select Tool>Movie>Format Conversion.)

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 9:21 AM   in reply to whsprague

    >HD Writer has one major requirement. It must be used to transfer files

     

    That is most likely related to the "metadata" information here http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1015001?tstart=0

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 9:32 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    Steve wrote, "Premiere Elements does not offer support for AVCHD 1080p."

     

    You have a great website and books with wonderful reviews.  But, respectully, I disagree with you.  It works fine for me in PE10. 

     

    Steve also wrote, "If you want to edit video from that camcorder in Premiere Elements, you will need to shoot it in 1080 60i."

     

    Again with respect for your work, maybe Adobe snuck in some improvements in PE10, that were not there in previous versions.

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 12:34 PM   in reply to whsprague

    Thanks for the update, whsprague. Although my list of project settings in version 10 still does not include one for AVCHD 1080p. (They do have a DSLR 1080p, but that's not the same thing.)

     

    But you might well be right.

     

    If so, what do you suggest the original poster do?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 9, 2012 4:45 PM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    > my list of project settings in version 10 still does not include one for AVCHD 1080p

        --Try AVCHD 720p60.  It seems the fps may be more important that the lines or interlacing to PE10

     

    > what do you suggest the original poster do


    The OP has not returned with any more information.  The original single problem was only that the real time playback in the monitor was choppy. He may have discovered (with your help) the red “render me” line and pressed return enough times that smoothness improved to his satisfaction.  His two additional posts say he will read a thread suggested by John T Smith and then he emphasised his need to work with existing footage.

     

    By now, he may also have discovered that final rendering to share the project came out smooth and to his satisfaction. 

     

    He may have installed the Panasonic software that came with his camera and discovered it would do all the 1080p60 editing he wants or needs.

     

    He may have used the Panasonic software to make a lesser quality copy that does play smoothly in the PE monitor. 

     

    Remember that he asked what to do for his existing footage.  But for the future, I would suggest he consider upgrading to PE10, or 11 when it arrives.  He should also keep an eye on his computer.  It is likely a four year old computer has become a little clogged with extras running in the background when they are not needed.  (My son has an i7 with a graphics card.  It took forever to put PE10 on it for my granddaughter. The Windows Resource Monitor showed both McCafe and Norton working hard and not allowing much else to use the HDD.)

     

    I would not suggest PE can’t do 1080p60 files.  It can and does.  However, if the computer is not up to the task of doing it smoothly enough for the OP, I would agree with you that he experiment with the lower quality settings on the camera.  While 1080p60 has bitrates around 28Mbps and makes huge files, the four lower settings can go all the way down as far as 5 Mbps and has significantly smaller files.  As long as there is not a lot of subject motion, panning or zooming, the picture quality on a big screen TV is still pretty good. 

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 10, 2012 7:21 AM   in reply to Bill T74

    You are using Premiere Elements 9, whsprague is using version 10

     

    I don't know what is EXACTLY different between the versions, but that is one area to consider

     
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    Jul 10, 2012 7:44 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    Version 10 added some good things.  The 'What's New' page is here: http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere-elements/features._sl_id-conten tfilter_sl_featuredisplaytypes_sl_new.html

     

    On it you can see a couple of things that may directly effect the subject of a not so smooth monitor window.  First, is the 64 bit option if you are running Windows 7 in 64bit.  Second, AVCHD and the ability to create HD disks on ordinary DVDs are mentioned.  All this suggests there may have been some tweaking of the internal bits of the software toward improving HD editing.

     

    When I upgraded from 9 to 10, I saw an improvement in performance. 

     

    Additionally, version 10 includes some improved (and amazing to me) color correction and the so called "Ken Burns" effect for putting some motion in plain photos. 

     

    The improved color correction is enough to justify the price of an upgrade.  I'm looking forward to what version 11 may include. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 10, 2012 10:30 AM   in reply to Bill T74

    >choppy and unwatchable. My computer is about 4 years old. It has an Intel dual core processor at 2.4 GHz and 4 GB RAM

     

    Your computer is under powered for AVCHD... you need a quad core i7 for SMOOTH HiDef editing

     

    You also need AT LEAST two 7200rpm hard drives... one for operating system and all software, the other for your video files... NEVER a partition !!!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 2:44 PM   in reply to Bill T74

    PrE does not rely very heavily on the GPU. I would say that the biggest component of the display chain is the video driver. So long as one can get updated drivers on a regular basis, most video cards will work fine. I would look for one that DOES have about 1GB of VRAM, and does not share system RAM to function. I like nVidia cards, but ATI/AMD makes great cards/chips too. Both companies are very quick to offer updated drivers, so all is cool on that front.

     

    One possible consideration would be if Adobe introduces some version of CUDA support for MPE (Mercury Playback Engine - like with PrPro), or offers support for OpenCL on the ATI/AMD cards. I have not heard even vague rumors that they might, and considering their target market, rather feel that they will not, at least for some time. However, I have been very wrong before, so who knows?

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 2:56 PM   in reply to Bill T74

    Take a look at http://forums.adobe.com/community/premiere/hardware_forum?view=overvie w

     

    The drop down FAQ list at the top has a lot of information... most are for Premiere Pro, but still good ideas for planning an AVCHD computer

     

    Some ideas for a Desktop Video Editing PC to buy

    http://www.adkvideoediting.com/

    -ADK Kudos http://forums.adobe.com/thread/877201

    .

    Or Build http://forums.adobe.com/thread/878520?tstart=0

    -more build ideas http://ppbm6.com/Planning.html

    -Build it Yourself http://forums.adobe.com/thread/815798

    -http://www.shawnlam.ca/2012/premiere-pro-cs6-video-editing-computer-bu ild/

     
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    Jul 11, 2012 4:52 PM   in reply to John T Smith

    I've been shopping for, but not buying yet, a laptop suitable for fast editing in case I upgrade to CS6.  I travel a lot, so a desk machine is not a good idea.  Most seem to be called "gamer's" computers.  None are cheap.  This one is an example of what looks like it would work well. http://www.amazon.com/ASUS-G75VW-DS72-17-3-Inch-Laptop-Black/dp/B007R9 PWLY/ref=wl_it_dp_o_piT1_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&coliid=I2ZBSQWKX0KCGW&colid=1WT GH7252T47J.  Unfortunately, it is not cheap at $2k.  Compared to the price of some Macs, it might be OK. 

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 5:22 PM   in reply to whsprague

    Bill,

     

    Laptops for video editing are rare - at least the really good ones. None is cheap, by anyone's standard either.

     

    I use a Sager (older now), but also recommend ADK.

     

    The Sagers ARE extreme-gaming laptops, but can be customized for video editing. The ADK's ARE designed for video editing.

     

    The good side:

    • They each offer 3x internal HDD's.
    • They each offer really good video cards, from mfgrs. that update drivers often.
    • They allow a lot of RAM for a laptop.
    • They offer a 17" screen, which I feel is the minimum.

     

    The bad side:

    • They ARE expensive.
    • Their battery life is limited, due to the advanced video cards, and especially the 3x internal HDD's.
    • They are rather heavy, due to the HDD's.

     

    Both offer great Technical Support.

     

    Good luck,

     

    hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 8:47 PM   in reply to whsprague

    >laptop suitable for fast editing

     

    Some ideas for a Laptop Video Editing PC from past discussions

    http://www.adkvideoediting.com/

    http://www.sagernotebook.com/ - http://forums.adobe.com/thread/957472

    .

    For effective HD video editing, a laptop with the following

    -at least the Intel sandy bridge 2720 or 2820 quad processor

    -and nvidia graphics such as the 460m with 1Gig video ram

    -1280x900 display with OpenGL 2.0-compatible graphics card

    -and 8 or 16 gig ram and Win7 64bit Pro

    -and 2 internal 7200 HDDs minimum

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 10:31 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    Similar is the HP 8570 laptop that can be equiped so that it can cost between about $1500 and $3000. http://www.hp.com/united-states/campaigns/workstations/8570w_features. html  Also, not as portable like a laptop, but perhaps easier to move between two offices might be the HP Z1 http://www.hp.com/united-states/campaigns/workstations/z1_features.htm l  My "problem" is that I'm a "snowbird" that migrates twice a year.  My "second studio" is a motorhome and there is not much room.

     

    Interesting (to me) is what HP calls "ISV" where someone actually certifies the hardware to run the software.  Note that the Z1 is certified for Premier Pro CS6.  http://h20331.www2.hp.com/hpsub/us/en/dme-new-products-1.html#app901  The laptop 8570 is not for CS6, but OK for Premier Pro CS5.5.

     

    Bill

     
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