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steve2014
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What types of skills does Adobe prmote?

Jul 10, 2012 12:18 PM

Hello all,

 

I am after a huge favour and would appreciate greatly if anyone can help me with this problem....

 

I am a trainee High school teacher and I am currently writing an essay on how ICT can motivate and aid learning skills; and I am currently talking about a section of my essay on Adobe products. What I'm after is perhaps links that touch on Adobe aiding students in these areas: understanding, analysis, problem-solving, collaborative, autonomy, and evaluation.

 

Many thanks folks!

 

Steven

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 10, 2012 1:06 PM   in reply to steve2014

    Steven,

     

    You must realize that Adobe is a huge corporation that publishes literally dozens if not hundreds of different applications.

     

    Could you narrow down your way-over-broad question to something remotely manageable?

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,528 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Jul 10, 2012 1:42 PM   in reply to steve2014

    I guess just learning to use such complex applications adeptly hone those skills.  I've been using Photoshop for half a lifetime and still not a day goes by that I don't learn something new about it.

     

    One of the things I've always liked about Photoshop is that it's "touchy feely" in a lot of ways - meaning that one approach to using it is just to move controls around until you like what you see.  After a while you get to learn what controls to move to make things look the way you want.  The Camera Raw converter is an extreme example of this - it actually seems to throw folks who take a more analytical approach off some at first - but after one gets a "feel" for what the controls do it's super fast to get directly to a good image from a raw exposure.

     

    I personally find learning things by doing, getting instant feedback, and making visual note of what's happening a very powerful and direct way to go right from concept to "muscle memory".  I'm not sure everyone agrees with this - there are all kinds of people in the world, and it's certainly true that no two people use Photoshop in the same way.

     

    Another very powerful learning resource is this very forum...  There's no better way to learn more things oneself than to help and teach others - as I'm sure you know!

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 10, 2012 2:34 PM   in reply to steve2014

    Sorry, Steven.  I still find your approach lacks direction.  Your question remains overly broad and vague.

     

    Photoshop is a professional level application for working professionals, not a learning development tool for students.  It makes no apologies for it's long and steep learning curve.  Certainly learning Photoshop can be a lifetime endeavor.

     

    This is indeed the Photoshop forum, but that doesn't mean folks here are necessarily familiar with Flash and/or Dreamweaver.  I for one, never go anywhere remotely near the latter two applications.

     

    As far as the "creative suites", be advised that they are but a figment of the imagination of the marketing folks at Adobe.  As has been often stated (mostly by me but also by others ), the individual point-applications  engineering teams are not only not in the same building but even in different cities, different states of the American Union and, in some cases, different countries and different continents. 

     

    They clearly do not work together very often nor very well, and they communicate as little as imaginable among themselves—as evidenced by suggestions made on the forums by Adobe engineers to "let the other teams know" that there are real problems that interfere with the other applications and with our work.

     

    Certainly any student learning Photoshop will be faced with a gazillion problems he or she has to understand, analyze and solve.  But those are skills that are required to learn the application, not something to be magically acquired by tackling the application, although, as Noel says, those skills will certainly be honed in the process.

     

    Having been married to a brilliant educator and school administrator for over four decades, I fully understand and admire your efforts in the area, though.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 10, 2012 3:07 PM   in reply to steve2014

    Hi Steven,

     

    You may want to look thru this section and see if any of the material might be helpful.

     

    http://edexchange.adobe.com/pages/d4178d15ff#narratives

     

    From a quick glance it appears to target Photoshop Elements, Premiere Elements, and Acrobat, but I would think general lesson plan goals could be applied to Creative Suite applications.

     

    regards,

    steve

     
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  • Pierre Courtejoie
    7,052 posts
    Jan 11, 2006
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    Jul 12, 2012 6:33 AM   in reply to steve2014

    Yes, I wanted to suggest to explore the Adobe eductation exchange.

    It does sound like the evaluators of your thesis want to assess the quality of your classes with a checklist?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 10:26 AM   in reply to steve2014

    steve2014 wrote:

     

    I am currently writing an essay on how ICT can motivate and aid learning skills; and I am currently talking about a section of my essay on Adobe products. What I'm after is perhaps links that touch on Adobe aiding students in these areas: understanding, analysis, problem-solving, collaborative, autonomy, and evaluation.


    Learning to use Photoshop does entail a student being able/willing to:

    expand their Attention Span;

    become a stickler for optimum Quality and a Seeker of Perfection;

    and to work to increase both long and short-term memory retention.

     

    I would think that these alone would provide sufficient reasons to include the use of this Application in your curriculum?

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 4:36 PM   in reply to steve2014

    One aspect, that has not been mentioned yet, is that Photoshop is a wonderful blend of both right-brain/left-brain work. On one hand, there is so very much about it that is technical, while on the other, "art" definitely comes into play.

     

    All students can benefit from both of those.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,528 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Jul 14, 2012 6:22 AM   in reply to steve2014

    Well...  If you're writing a checklist of the criteria for your own evaluation, "success-oriented" things like the following would be good, don't you think? 

     

    Instructor:

    • Shows up at school
    • Generally avoids running over people in the school parking lot
    • Can find way to classroom
    • Knows how to turn on lights and computers
    • Takes attendance and/or reports attendance to school administration
    • Breathes air
    • Recognizes supervisor
    • Attends school activities (such as lunch)

     

    Sorry, I was just thinking a like Dilbert and poking a little fun.  Forgive me.    A few decades ago, in all seriousness, when I worked for a big high-tech company I really did have a boss who asked me to write up a set of "success-oriented goals" for him to use to evaluate my job performance.

     

    -Noel

     
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