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How to globally change straight double quotes to curly open and close?

Jul 16, 2012 8:56 AM

Tags: #indesign #quotation_marks

I am editing with InDesign (5.5) some documents created by others. I suddenly noticed that the double quote marks were straight, not curly, in one document and Find/Change does not seem to offer and option to distiguish the open (left) double quote mark from the right (close) when starting with double straight quotes. Any suggestions?

 

And--unrelated--why is so hard to get to a page where you can actually post a question?

 

Thanks!

 

Jill

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 16, 2012 9:17 AM   in reply to SnowshoeLaneLOL

    First thing, if you open the file and go to preferences (Edit > Prefernces... on Windows, InDesign > Preferences... on Mac), is the Enable Typographers Quotes  box checked in the Type section?

     
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    Jul 16, 2012 9:36 AM   in reply to SnowshoeLaneLOL

    Since the position of a double quotation mark determines its shape, it is easiest to use GREP with Find/Change. You can (1) find a straight quotation mark at the beginning of a word/phrase and change it to left quotation marks, and then (2) find a straight quotation mark at the end of a word/phrase and change it to right quotation marks.

     

    (1)

    Find what:

    ~"([\l\u\)[:punct:]])

    This finds a straight quotation mark in front of any character or punctuation.

     

    Change to:

    \x{201C}$1

    This puts a left quotation marks in front of what was behind the straight quotation mark.

     

    (2)

    Find what:

    ([\l\u\)[:punct:]])~"

    This finds a straight quotation mark behind any character or punctuation.

     

    Change to:

    $1\x{201D}

    This puts a left quotation mark behind what was behind the straight quotation mark.

     

    I would find/change the first hits one at a time, and when you are confident that it works for your documents, go ahead and Change All.

     
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    Jul 16, 2012 9:50 AM   in reply to samar02

    Samar,

     

    While your thinking is sound, the execution probably isn't. The position of close quotations relative to punctuation is hightly dependent on the language conventions as well as the type of words in use. In US English, for example, most style manuals will tell you that periods and commas are always inside the quotes unless you are quoting from a foreign source where the convention is that punctuation goes outside the quotes or you are using a term, such as in a coding manual, where placing the puctuation inside might cause confusion. Other types of puctuation, such as question marks and exclamation points, would normally fall outside the quote, and parentheses, brackets, braces, dashes, etc. might fall either in or out of the quote.

     

    I'd be more inclined to look for whitespace preceding a quote mark, or a quote mark at the beginning of a paragagraph (I think you need two searches to do this) and repalce the quote mark with an open curly quote, then look for other straight quotes and replace with a close curly quote, but Im not sure that's foolproof either.

     
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    Jul 16, 2012 10:02 AM   in reply to SnowshoeLaneLOL

    It is going to find the end quote mark in front of a question mark, among other things, and change it to an open quote on that first query.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 16, 2012 10:15 AM   in reply to SnowshoeLaneLOL

    It may be even simpler. If you change your preferences to Typographers quotes, and then to a regular change from " to ", (straight quote to straight quote) the new marks will be placed as correct typographers’ quotes. (Of course, if you have used any of these for inch and foot marks, you will have to go back a change the preference to fix them.)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 16, 2012 10:20 AM   in reply to SnowshoeLaneLOL

    This will probably be better:

     

    (1)

     

    Find what:

    ~"([\w]([[:punct:]])?)

    This finds a straight quotation mark in front of any letter or digit that may be followed by a punctuation character.

     

    Change to:

    \x{201C}$1

    This puts a left quotation marks in front of what was behind the straight quotation mark.

     

    (2)

     

    Find what:

    ([\w]([[:punct:]])?)~"

    This finds a straight quotation mark behind any letter or digit that may be followed by a punctuation character.

     

    Change to:

    $1\x{201D}

     

    This puts a left quotation mark behind what was behind the straight quotation mark.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 28, 2013 7:02 PM   in reply to SnowshoeLaneLOL

    WAIT, I found an infintely easier solution.

     

    With Edit/preferences/Type set to turn on typographer's quotes, using GREP, put this same string in both the find and change fields, then do a change all:

     

    \x{22}

     

    It works, and super-quickly.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 29, 2013 5:36 AM   in reply to HBinswanger

    That's what was suggested in above in post #8, but you've used the unicode value rather than typing the metacharacter or pasting the quote mark.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 29, 2013 10:35 AM   in reply to Peter Spier

    Yes, I used that earlier suggestion, but two things: 1. This doesn't require changing preferences (assuming one has it set to smartquotes), 2. using the unicode in GREP finds only straight quotes, not curly ones as using the literal symbols does. I'm working with a 410 page book, and doing the literal (per post #8) took about 15 seconds, as every single quote, straight and curly, was found and replaced. Using the GREP search for the unicode took under 1 second.

     

    Incidentally, it turns out that you don't need "0022" just "22".

     
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