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How to best open a 35 mm slide RAW scan with 4000 dpi in Camera RAW CS5?

Jul 20, 2012 2:59 AM

I have, at present, set Camera Raw to open files as ProPhoto RGB and as 360 dpi. I want to keep all options open for later use of the files (for albums or enlargements). How do I get the best results so that I do not diminish the quality obtained in the scanning process (where I try to use only ICE and to leave all other editing to PS later - I know that the changes made by ICE are permanent so that I already here do not have a real RAW - but it is my impression that the choice of RAW over TIFF in the scanning is still worth it).

 

I have also some older scans but these are TIFF's, also 4000 dpi but only 8 bit. I want to get the best result from both types of files.

 

I plan to perform all edits before I finally save files in various print sizes. I am still quite scared as to make mistakes when resizing so that I get an inferior quality in the new size.  I, of course, keep a copy of the original scans safe and unedited.

 

I am also in doubt as to wether I should go directly into PS or via Camera Raw with the scans.

 

Excuse these foolish questions from a grandmother who is a complete newbie as to film scanning and still quite "green" as to PS.

 
Replies
  • Trevor Dennis
    5,905 posts
    May 24, 2010
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    Jul 20, 2012 3:56 AM   in reply to GitAmager1

    I had not heard of scanning software that would import files in a RAW format but I see from THIS THREAD that it is indeed possible.  In fact you might get your answers just from reading that thread.

     

    How do the RAW files compare with TIFF regards file size?  (Tiff can produce some monster files sizes)    I'd definitely be inclined to experiment with using ACR - espcially if you have Lightroom 4 or CS6 because its tools are so good.

     
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    Jul 20, 2012 3:17 PM   in reply to Trevor Dennis

    If the files are actually some form of raw, such as from a camera, you will have no choice but to work with Camera Raw first. All edits in Camera Raw are non-destructive, so you can edit forever and never damage the file. Other than whether or not to use Camera Raw (and you should) I'm not sure if you have another question here.

     
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    Jul 21, 2012 5:10 PM   in reply to GitAmager1

    I doubt very much that Adobe Camera Raw would be able to open files from a scanner that are unfortunately called "RAW".  That Nikon Scan or VueScan "raw" file has nothing to do with Camera Raw as from a digital camera's sensor.

     

    ACR will open a TIFF or a JPEG, though.

     
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    Jul 21, 2012 5:11 PM   in reply to GitAmager1

    Edited my previous post:

     

    ACR will open a TIFF or a JPEG, though.

     
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    Jul 24, 2012 2:27 PM   in reply to GitAmager1

    Does the scanner scan as NEF? I've never heard of such a thing. But you have to remember that just because a file has an NEF extension doesn't mean it's the same as all other NEF files. We have to release new versions of the Camera Raw plug-in all the time because every time Nikon releases a new camera, it's raw NEF files are different than the raw NEF files from previous cameras. So I don't know if these scanner raw NEF files are supposed to be the equivolent of camera raw NEF files, but in all likelyhood they are not. There is no shame or harm in using TIFF rather than NEF in this case. If you really aren't sure whether Photoshop will work with the scanner NEF files, scan one and test. If it doesn't work, then use TIFF. If it works, then continue to use the NEF format.

     
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    Jul 24, 2012 3:13 PM   in reply to Brett N

    Nikon's film scanners saved their "raw" scans with the extension NEF.

    But the contents of the file are more like a common TIFF and nothing like a camera RAW file.

     

    Over the years, Nikon has put many different things inside the extension NEF, and even changed their camera RAW data representation quite a bit - while keeping the same file extension.

     
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    May 11, 2013 12:49 PM   in reply to Brett N

    I have experimented with saving a couple of scans as NEF files.  I am using CS6 and I have no problem with ACR opening up the file.  I am not sure, at the moment, beyond that what they mean by a NEF file in the scanner software.

     

    I am using Nikon Coolscan V with Nikon Scan 2..02 on a Windows XP 32 bit machine.  (The thought of having to go to Windows 7 is scaring me to death.)

     
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