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How do you sharpen an image in layers

Aug 1, 2012 7:41 AM

I have pc that uses xp pro cs5.1 extended....everything on the program works!! in normal editing mode I can do most things including sharpening, selection....recently I started to edit within layers and I can get most things done...but I cannot figure out how to sharpen the image once it is in layers as it is not one of the choices in the drop down menu, the same goes for selection. If this cannot be done then I will flatten the image and edit normally. My knowlege of layers is basic so be kind to me

Regards,

Capt Marvy

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2012 7:46 AM   in reply to capt marvy
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2012 8:31 AM   in reply to capt marvy

    High Pass!

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,534 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Aug 1, 2012 8:42 AM   in reply to capt marvy

    A pet peeve of mine is excess worry about being "non-destructive".

     

    The word is misused.  What you're doing (assuming you have any Photoshop capability at all and you're trying to make the image better, not worse) is constructive.

     

    You should understand that the previews you see in Photoshop of your multi-layer image (unless you take extreme measures in configuration which I doubt many people know about) are all done in 8 bits/channel, so it's doubtful you're seeing what you're doing at a high quality level anyway.

     

    If you really want to maintain all your layers and minimize the impact of sharpening, you can stamp the visible layers into a new layer of pixels above all the others (Control Alt Shift E) then sharpen it.  If you have to work on the document you can just do it again afterward - it's not like it takes a long time to do.

     

    But honestly it's not even evil to just re-develop an image from a raw file and do all the edits again.  I find that I can often do a better job overall on a photo after doing that - and it avails you of the most recent advancements in Camera Raw.

     

    I'm sorry if this message seems harsh, and please know that I'm not directing any criticism to anyone here, I just have a very strong personal opinion that all this "non-destructive" editing hype is just so much BS.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2012 9:08 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel, there seems to be no end to your series of "pet peeves".    Hard to take any of them seriously after a point, I think.

     

    (Attach your standard "no offense" or "no criticism" disclaimer here.  )

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2012 9:08 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    I'm well aware that I am in no position to quarrel with anybody, and I'll just quietly take a hiatus from the forums now. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2012 9:33 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    you can stamp the visible layers into a new layer of pixels above all the others (Control Alt Shift E) then sharpen it.

    Noel,

     

    thanks for this advice. I've been sharpening normally in the background

    layer, which is almost correct, if the other layers don't contribute by

    extreme changes. Or after flattening, of course.

     

    Concerning 'non-destructive': in my opinion you're right. An improvement

    of image appearance isn't destructive.

     

    A pity, that the Renaissance painters didn't know how to paint non-

    destructive. If they had known, then Botticelli might have tried to improve

    this really ugly left arm of Venus:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Birth_of_Venus_%28Botticelli%29

     

    Best regards --Gernot Hoffmann

     

    ...and Leonardo would have converted the ugly claw of the Lady with

    an Ermine into something pleasant:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_with_an_Ermine

     

    Message was edited by: Gernot Hoffmann

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,534 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Aug 1, 2012 10:05 AM   in reply to Gernot Hoffmann

    Gernot, my understanding is that many of those ancient canvasses have totally different paintings underneath - owing to the scarcity of canvas to paint on.  Thus the masters destructively used layers...  I have a whole crate of these monkey wrenches today, and I'm not afraid to use 'em. 

     

    To R (station_two), I think I have earned the right to air my opinions occasionally.  I believe you have too, though I fully understand your wanting to be conservative.

     

    Capt, just another thing to keep in mind:  No operation is truly destructive unless you delete your original files, right?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,534 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Aug 1, 2012 10:03 AM   in reply to capt marvy

    capt marvy wrote:

     

    on a pc what is the key stroke for duplicate layer

     

    I think it's Control-J, though I may be mistaken (I usually right-click a layer and choose Duplicate).

     

    I'm not sure why a keystroke is not listed in the Layer menu next to Duplicate.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • JJMack
    6,057 posts
    Jan 9, 2006
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    Aug 1, 2012 10:53 AM   in reply to capt marvy

    There are a countless number of ways to sharpen and image and a countless number of opnions on sharpenig.  I sharpen in two placess a little upfront just to have a image a little sharper to work with then the images straight from my camera.  I sharpen again for output and I like adding a sharpening layer to the top of the layer stack and blend the sharpening effect into the layer below. Using a blending mode of luminosity along with using blend if gray will protect colors, shadows and highlights. Makeing that layer a smart object will make filters use on it smart filters which can have a filter mask like an edge mask to sharpen edges and protect. Any filter you use like USM, Smart Sharpen, Highpass can be re-adjusted. You can additionally add a layer mask to the sharpening layer and play with its opacity and fill to adjust the sharpening effect and way you want to. Here is a link to an action I posted years ago as an example. You may want to look at it and come up with an action the fits in with your work-flow http://www.mouseprints.net/old/dpr/CS3_Smart_Sharpen_Filter_Adjustment _Layer.atn

     
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