Skip navigation
srhzaidi
Currently Being Moderated

Creating inner pages

Jul 23, 2012 9:02 AM

Hello, I am new to web. I have created a main page that has a banner under the buttons panel and then some text. For my inside pages I want the banner removed and one space for the text which should include the space I already had for text. How do I create one solid table? Is it possible to edit your layout after it has been brought into dreamweaver from illustrator? I imported it after slicing the layout in illustrator.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 23, 2012 11:12 AM   in reply to srhzaidi

    The approach you seem to be taking ("I imported it after slicing the layout in illustrator.") is very wrong for live webpages.  The correct approach is to design your layout in some graphics application first, then to design your HTML infrastructure which will hold both the various graphic elements and the text content in DW.  Finally you would then add the graphics and the content and save the page.  If the layout is to be used on multiple pages, investigate the use of Dreamweaver templates, or of server-side includes to supply a consistent layout appearance to each page, and add your unique content to each.

     

    It will not be possible to execute this plan smoothly without some basic knowledge of HTML and CSS.  Do you have that?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 23, 2012 11:18 AM   in reply to srhzaidi

    This 3-part tutorial describes how to go from a Design Comp in your graphics application to a CSS Layout in Dreamweaver.  As Murray said, some knowledge of HTML & CSS code is required.

     

    Part 1 - Initial Design

    http://www.adobe.com/devnet/dreamweaver/articles/dw_fw_css_pt1.html

     

    Part 2 - Markup preparation

    http://www.adobe.com/devnet/dreamweaver/articles/dw_fw_css_pt2.html

     

    Part 3 - Layout and CSS

    http://www.adobe.com/devnet/dreamweaver/articles/dw_fw_css_pt3.html

     

     

    Nancy O.

    Alt-Web Design & Publishing

    Web | Graphics | Print | Media  Specialists 

    http://alt-web.com/

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 23, 2012 4:25 PM   in reply to srhzaidi

    Although that 3-part tutorial was written for Fireworks users, the same principles  apply no matter which graphics app you use (Photoshop, Illustrator, Fireworks, CorrelDraw, etc..). 

     

    Personally, I don't use Illustrator except for vector graphics.  I use Photoshop for all my web graphics (RGB).

     

    There used to be those blue layout things and green layout things in dreamweaver. Where you could post images inside and they could work just as well.

     

    Pictures of text can not be searched, translated or indexed by Google.  You must have real text on web pages. 

     

    Nancy O.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 23, 2012 4:59 PM   in reply to srhzaidi

    Open DW. 

    Go to File > New > Blank page > HTML > Choose one of the pre-built CSS Layouts (1-col, fixed, centered, header & footer).

     

    Insert images and text into the Layout.

     

     

    Nancy O.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 27, 2012 4:16 PM   in reply to srhzaidi

    srhzaidi,

     

    If I may chime in and offer some perspective and thought. As you probably have notice this by now, HTML and CSS has evolved quickly since 2000.

     

    Along with Murray (most knowledgable and most nicest fellas I ever known - even though I never met him in person, but would love to meet him through Adobe conference or something (smile)) and Nancy O, it has been a couple years of my hiatius from Dreamweaver user-to-user forum community... I would recommend that you look into HTML5 and CSS3.

     

    Next to HTML5 and CSS3, because you probably will need to know how to code them and design websites with HTML5/CSS3. Now that we know that many people have the access to smartphones, tablets and also have access to personal computer whether if it is laptop or desktop computer or all of these gorgeous toys (smile).

     

    Then, it is *wise* to design 'responsive web design' website that is more friendlier to all kinds of web browsers (old browsers, yes, and modern browsers) all across the platform regardless - it can be DONE with HTML5/CSS3 by incorporating responsive web design concept. While at that, it can be a hard of work coding CSS3 files to do this. But the good news is that Dreamweaver CS6 (I don't know which Dreamwever version you are using currently) is capable of creating media query website. BUT, like what Murray said, knowing HTML and CSS is very helpful.

     

    Hope some perspective and thought be of interest with ideas. BTW, try to avoid too much of graphic web files as it slow down downloading these files especially for smartphones over cellular network (while it is not using WiFi network). If it is used WiFi, then cool. Be thoughtful and do a through testing.

     

    In closing, I seconded to Murray's and Nancy O with their thoughtful suggestions. In closing, you can google on 'responsive web design'. It is a good time to learn about responsive web design, becuase it is obvious and feasible choice. Thus, more pleasant web browsing for everyone involved.

     

    Hope that helps.

    Brian

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 28, 2012 5:01 PM   in reply to CaramelMacchiato

    @Brian,

    While I agree that 'Responsive Web Design' techniques are a good thing to know, I don't think 'Responsive' is necessarily a good  First Project; especially if the OP has limited experience with HTML & CSS fundamentals. 

     

    'Responsive Web Design' is an advanced project to tackle AFTER code basics are fully understood.  IOW, Learn to swim before you jump into the deep end.

     

     

    Nancy O.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 29, 2012 9:51 AM   in reply to srhzaidi

    Sorry about your client.  A new 30 page static web site takes much longer than 2-3 days to design, build and test.  A typical static site would take about 1 month to build.

     

    Positioning is not needed for 98% of layouts.  Position:absolute is definitely not the way to begin. Here's why:

    http://www.apptools.com/examples/pagelayout101.php

     

    Learn to use default CSS positioning (none/static) along with margins, padding and floats.

    http://alt-web.com/TEMPLATES/Basic-1-col-fixed.shtml

     

     

     

    Nancy O.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 29, 2012 1:19 PM   in reply to Nancy O.

    @Nancy,

     

    I agree with everything you, it is true.

     

    On other hands, I would think HTML5 and CSS3 is a good way to start and learn. It seems that there are better resource that are available now than it was before. You remember how confusing it was - especially with browsers incompatibility.

     

    Yes, of course, more work need to be done especially with responsive design websites with CSS media queries.

     

    The bottom line is knowing HTML and CSS helps. Definitely, for certain!

     

    Thanks again for all remarkable and awesome help you, Nancy, did for Adobe community!

     

    Have a good one!

    Brian

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 29, 2012 1:36 PM   in reply to srhzaidi

    Just as what Nancy said, I am also sorry to hear about your client. Sometimes certain client's expectation can be unreasonable at times. Expect that website project to be completed within two-three days' timeframe is pretty unreasonable.

     

    Like what Nancy said - one month for any web development project is more reasonable for static websites. For data-driven, more complicated websites that work with database servers and such, more than one month may be requried. That issue is different, totally different issue. But if client expect that complicated website is to be completed within two/three days - that won't happen and won't work that way.

     

    You wish not to learn HTML5 and CSS3, it is certainly your decision. I can only encourage you to learn HTML5 and CSS3 - by knowing HTML and CSS inside out will certainly help. In a long run, it will make a lot more sense later on. You'll see. BUT, I'll just leave at that and move on.

     

    Have a remarkable day and thanks for letting us know.

    Brian

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 30, 2012 7:04 AM   in reply to srhzaidi

    I don't plan on learning HTML5 and CSS3 anytime soon

     

    I think that's a mistake.  Dive in - the water's fine!

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2012 8:48 PM   in reply to srhzaidi

    Just a quick follow up on responsive web design concept based in combination of HTML5, CSS3 and jQuery, have a read with some interesting case studies and perspective. I think it is truly unbaised info.

     

    http://responsivedesign.ca

     

    Have a good one!

     

    Brian

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points