Skip navigation
jguadagni
Currently Being Moderated

First high performance PC buy..thoughts for CS6

Aug 1, 2012 9:50 PM

Tags: #cs6

I am looking to buy a Dell PC to run Production Premium. I will be editing HD DSLR footage of my wedding using CS6. I want a system that will handle this media but do not want to go overboard highend. Here is what I found so far.

 

 

BASEXPS 8500
ChassisXPS 8500, Black Chassis w/19:1 media card reader
PROCESSOR3rd Generation Intel® Core™ i7-3770 processor (up to 3.90 GHz)
MONITORNo Monitor
SPEAKERSNo speakers (Speakers are required to hear audio from your system)
WIRELESSDell Wireless 1703 802.11b/g/n, Bluetooth v4.0+LE
SOUND CARDIntegrated 7.1 with WAVE MAXXAudio 4
USB 3.0Integrated 10/100/1000 Ethernet



Optical SWNo PDVD
Power CordUS Power Cord

 

OPERATING SYSTEMWindows® 7 Home Premium, 64Bit, Englishedit




edit
MEMORY12GB Dual Channel DDR3 1600MHz - 4 DIMMsedit
HARD DRIVE1TB 7200 RPM SATA Hard Drive 6.0 Gb/sedit
VIDEO CARDAMD Radeon™ HD 7570 1GB GDDR5edit




edit
OPTICAL DRIVE16X CD/DVD burner (DVD+/-RW), write to CD/DVD

 

 

TOTAL $899.99

 

 

 

 

 

I am most concerned with the video card. I could upgrade to the cards below, but I know they still not be considered compatable for CUDA for Mercury Playback.

 


NVIDIA® GeForce® GT 640 1GB GDDR5 [add $50.00]
AMD Radeon™ HD 7770 2GB GDDR5 [add $150.00]

 

I am thinking about just choosing the cheapest card offered, save money, and buy highend card separately.

 

Am I on the right track with this system, or no where close?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2012 9:58 PM   in reply to jguadagni

    [Moved to Hardware Forum]

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 1, 2012 11:25 PM   in reply to jguadagni

    As equipped, you are nowhere close. 12GB total RAM is not enough for CS6. Heck, even 16GB is not quite enough for a desktop running CS6, especially if most of your video work involves downsizing HD to SD for DVD. The system needs all of 32GB of RAM just for it to perform anywhere close to fast.

     

    Second, none of the Radeon cards support GPU-accelerated Mercury Playback at all in Windows. You could "hack" a text file to enable CUDA GPU acceleration in MPE for the GT 640 - but why would you want to with this i7-3770/GT 640 combo? The GT 640 is actually slower with GPU acceleration than in software-only mode because it is such a weakling GPU: Tests proved that the retail DDR3 version of the GT 640 is slower than even a GTS 450, let alone a GTX 550 Ti. And even with GDDR5 memory, that GT 640 is no faster than a GTS 450.

     

    Third, as equipped that system has only one single hard drive. If you are also going to use the exact same hard drive for not only the OS and programs, but also for media, projects, previews, cache and exports, that will slow down the system performance significantly - sometimes to the point where overall performance is as slow as or slower than systems equipped with CPUs that are three generations old. This is because one SATA channel only allows data transfers in one direction at a time (due to its half-duplex nature), which means that a block of transfers in one direction must be completed before any transfers can commence in the opposite direction. However, editing and encoding require simultaneous bidirectional transfers, something that a single SATA connection does not allow at all. As such, you will need at least two more SATA hard drives (three or four more drives would be even better).

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2012 1:02 AM   in reply to jguadagni

    I want a system that will handle this media but do not want to go overboard highend.

     

    This system is going the other direction, overboard lowend.

     

    If you want to follow Randall's suggestions, all of which are very valid, think outside the box and especially outside Dell boxes, unless you want to go overboard on the price. Dell steals you blind with everything you add or change, delivers crippled BIOS, does not allow overclocking and comes with a Dell PSU, that has non-standard dimensions.

     

    Think about building yourself if budget is important, otherwise go the custom builders like http://www.adkvideoediting.com/

     

    What you need is at least a quad core i7 with HT, 16 or better 32 GB RAM, a nVidia GTX 550 Ti or better a GTX 660+ video card and at least three separate 7200 RPM SATA disks, running under Win7 64 Pro.

     

    See Adobe Forums: What PC to build? An update...

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2012 6:16 AM   in reply to jguadagni

    Is there any pre-built PC (workstations) that would get the job done, or building the best bet?

     

    The problem with the big name brands, Dell, Boxx, HP, Alienware is that they don't have any workstation ready to order for video editing. You need to configure yourself and if you do it with one of the big names, they all steal you blind.

     

    So the consequence is that you have to come up with a shortlist of components you need, that really is the first step, and then compare how much it is going to cost you if you build yourself and what it would cost you at a place like ADK to have those components installed in a ready to run system. Give Eric at ADK a call for some ideas.

     

    This is a different price range, but the ideas are the same: Adobe Forums: Planning / building a new system. Part 1

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 2, 2012 8:07 AM   in reply to jguadagni

    >any pre-built

     

    Click the ADK link that Harm provided

    
     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 3, 2012 2:13 PM   in reply to jguadagni

    If you ever decide you want more than 16Gig Ram you can't... you need Win7 64bit PRO for more than 16Gig

     

    If you ever decide you want more Ram, or especially a 3rd and/or 4th hard drive, a 600w PS "may" be a bit small

     

    If your case has a spot for a side fan, to blow outside air onto the motherboard and nVidia card... add it

     

    Otherwise, as a "minimum" system... looks OK to me

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 4, 2012 12:19 AM   in reply to jguadagni

    Definitely upgrade the video card.  96 CUDA cores vs. 336 CUDA cores.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 4, 2012 1:15 AM   in reply to Peru Bob

    Plus DDR5 instead of DDR3. The 560 and especially the Ti version are much faster than the 630. I second Bob.

     

    If you think you need more power in this system you will need more disks, but I would first see how it works. I would not be surprised that you find more disks not a necessity, but a luxury.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 4, 2012 6:35 AM   in reply to Harm Millaard

    Plus DDR5 instead of DDR3. The 560 and especially the Ti version are much faster than the 630. I second Bob.

    I agree there. In fact, as I have noted a couple of times, the GT 630 is actually a renamed GT 440. And even the DDR5 version of the GT 440 is slower than the retail GT 640 (which itself is slower than even a GTS 450, let alone a GTX 550 Ti).

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 6, 2012 9:42 PM   in reply to jguadagni

    Ok, I found a local company in PIttsburgh that does custom builds and it will avoid me paying any shipping. They seem to favor AMD products heavily, and are trying to steer me towards an AMD Fx CPU and an AMD GPU.

     

    A company that does not know sh*t about video editing and are trying to steer you towards AMD is only looking at a custom build that gives them the biggest margin, not what serves you best for your purposes. Well, you get what you pay for, but saving on transport cost will be more than compensated by the lousy service they can offer, if at all. At ADK you know you get the best system for your purposes and great service from people who know video editing, have extensive experience with Adobe software, so they really know what they are talking about.

     

    Personally I would not trust that local company to do any decent job. As a test ask them how they will setup your video. I bet they don't even know that you have to disable the Intel graphics in the Bios for proper operation of PR.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 7, 2012 7:03 AM   in reply to jguadagni

    I completely echo Harm's comments

     

    Also you have a terrible mismatch with the basic system and the graphics card.  With that CPU and 16 GB of RAM that 192 CUDA core GTX 550 Ti is useless  With my PPBM5 testing with an i7-2600K at 4.4 GHz ,16 GB RAM, system it took 146 seconds to perform the our MPEG2-DVD encoding test with the GPU and not using the GPU (CPU only) it took 111 seconds.  You need at least the GTX 560 Ti or better.to balance performance.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 7, 2012 8:00 PM   in reply to jguadagni

    I would not recommend such a CPU downgrade because the i5 that you listed lacks Hyperthreading, and is thus limited to four threads maximum. And because Premiere performs better with more CPU threads, the downgrade from an i7-3770K to an i5-3570K would have slowed down everything by a factor of around 20 percent although the MPEG-2 DVD encoding performance with GPU acceleration enabled would not have suffered as much. The downgrade to an i5 would have made the GTX 550 Ti more balanced with the CPU but everything else would have been around 20 percent slower. That's significant, in my view.

     

    Also, the integrated Intel graphics cannot utilize GPU acceleration in MPE at all. Therefore, rendering and MPEG encoding performance falls back entirely onto the CPU.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 13, 2012 1:47 PM   in reply to jguadagni

    I just had a complete computer system built in November 2011  by ADK for me. Many people suggested them to me from these forums and other forums. I spoke with Eric at ADK a few times for his advice on what I would need in a new system for the type of video work i do ..After he heard of what I did he recommended less cost hardware stating if I got what I wanted it would be way over kill at a large increase in cost.The system I purchased from them is simply excellent.Quiet , yet powerful. I am editing , with effects, avchd footage with absolutely no problems.I purchased Adobe Production suite at an excellent price ..ADK installed all the software and optimized all programs and settings .A Source and Render array of 2 -1tb each hard drives and a 1tb system drive ..all professionaly set up.I highly recommend anyone getting a new system to talk with Eric at ADK and purchase a system from them.They know NLE system builds in every aspect.You can't go wrong.Specify what work you want to do with your system and they will build it .

    The previous paragraph was written a few months ago ...what follows is a brief update.After lots of work ..and play on this computer system I can state with much sincerity that ADK is the absolute best company in making video - photo  editing computer systems.

    Eric is simply the best and all those that made my wonderful machine are hereby thanked . Incredibly quiet, powerful and fast

    Between ADK and Harm Millard you can't find more knownledgable and helpful people.

    Trust ADK.

    Sincerely , Ray Perry

    
     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points