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TheReestv
Currently Being Moderated

A few questions ..

Aug 4, 2012 7:04 PM

Hi,

 

I was wondering if somebody could help me with a few pre-payment questions I have.

 

1. What is the difference between paying month-to-month and one-year?

They have different prices, but both last one year?

 

2. If I was to purchase Photoshop CS6 on a subscription, probably month-to-month:

  • how long would I be paying for? It is only a 12 month subscription, right?
  • would I still be able to use my Adobe product after I stop paying monthly?

 

If anybody could help with my questions, I would be extremely grateful.

Many thanks.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 4, 2012 7:18 PM   in reply to TheReestv

    1. What is the difference between paying month-to-month and one-year?

    They have different prices, but both last one year?

    Month-to-month = monthly commitment only. Paid monthly but stop in any month you choose. More expensive than the 12 month contract.

     

    One-year is a 12 month commitment, paid monthly. So if you sign up today, you pay monthly but stop paying in August 2013 at the earliest.

     

    So on a monthly deal, Adobe is only guranteeed one month's payment at any time. Up to you when you stop paying.

     

    On a 12 month deal, Adobe is guaranteed a minimum of 12 payments (all paid monthly).

     

     

    2. If I was to purchase Photoshop CS6 on a subscription, probably month-to-month:

    • how long would I be paying for? It is only a 12 month subscription, right?

     

    On a monthly pllan, you stop paying in any month you choose.

     

    On a 12--month plan (starting in  Aug 20012), you can stop paying in Aug 2013.

     

     

     

    would I still be able to use my Adobe product after I stop paying monthly?

    No.

     

    At the moment, they're all-or-nothing deals. You only lease the software for use while you pay.

     

    When you stop paying, you can  no longer use the software.

     

    Many people have asked for a more customer-friendly exit plan - ie. pay a residual fee at the end of the lease period to purchase subscription the software outright. That is not currently on offer from Adobe. Perhaps they're considering it?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 4, 2012 7:23 PM   in reply to TheReestv

    Yes, that's known as a perpetually licensed version of the software.

     

    You either purchase outright by download or get a box of discs shipped to you.

     

    It's a big one-off upfront expense but it's yours to keep and use forever.

     

     

     

    The downside now is that you must upgrade perpetually licensed versions with every new release to get upgrade pricing.

     

    If you buy CS6 now at full price then skip CS7 (avoiding the upgrade cost) and upgrade to CS8, you must pay full price for CS8 again.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 4, 2012 7:31 PM   in reply to TheReestv

    If you have purchased the perpetual license version of CS6 then it's yours to keep and use forever.

     

    When CS7 arrives, you can:

     

    a) ignore it and keep using CS6 forever.

     

    b) upgrade to CS7 at upgrade pricing (and still use CS6 if you wish)

     

    c) Skip CS7 (or any future version) and still use CS6 and wait for a future version - but you must pay full price for any future version

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 4, 2012 10:23 PM   in reply to John Waller

    John Waller wrote:

     

    If you have purchased the perpetual license version of CS6 then it's yours to keep and use forever.

     

    When CS7 arrives, you can:

     

     

    b) upgrade to CS7 at upgrade pricing (and still use CS6 if you wish)…

     

    You'll find this hard to believe and even harder to swallow, but the position of the Adobe lawyers is that the EULA implies or specifies that you lose the right to use the earlier version when you upgrade.  I know, that's horse manure.  Many of us keep several versions of Photoshop installed, and there are occasional, legitimate reasons for going back to an earlier version.

     

    Think Image Ready, Picture Package or any other functionality deprecated by Adobe or 3rd-party plug-ins that don't run in 64 bits or those that have been bought by Adobe only to kill them, like Grain Surgery.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 5, 2012 12:59 AM   in reply to station_two

    station_two wrote:
    You'll find this hard to believe and even harder to swallow, but the position of the Adobe lawyers is that the EULA implies or specifies that you lose the right to use the earlier version when you upgrade.

    The EULA seems clear enough that use of Prior Versions is OK provided they're used on the same machine where the update is installed.

     

    http://www.adobe.com/products/eulas/pdfs/Gen_WWCombined-MULTI-20111031 _1230.pdf

     

    5. Updates.

     

    If the Software is an Update to a prior version of Adobe software (the “Prior Version”), then Customer’s

    use of this Update is conditional upon its retention of the Prior Version. Therefore, if Customer validly

    transfers this Update pursuant to Section 4.6, the Customer must transfer the Prior Version along with it.

    If Customer wishes to use this Update in addition to the Prior Version, then Customer may only do so on

    the same Computer on which it has installed and is using the Prior Version. Any obligations that Adobe

    may have to support Prior Versions during the License Term may end upon the availability of this

    Update. No other use of the Update is permitted. Additional Updates may be licensed to Customer by

    Adobe with additional or different terms.

     

    .

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 5, 2012 1:18 AM   in reply to John Waller

    Thank you for taking the time and effort to wade through the EULA, John.  It's good to have it highlighted for future reference.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 6, 2012 4:48 AM   in reply to John Waller

    On second thought, this EULA cited by John Waller is a mess in that it references "updates" instead of "upgrades"! 

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 6, 2012 8:22 AM   in reply to John Waller

    John Waller wrote:

     

    If you have purchased the perpetual license version of CS6 then it's yours to keep and use forever.

     

    Keep in mind that the software contains "activation" logic - that is, it won't run without Adobe's permission.

     

    I don't know whether the software, once installed, re-affirms Adobe's permission from time to time (I suspect it does), but it's a given that permission would need to be obtained again if you were to install the software on a new computer or reinstall it on a re-imaged computer.  Such things happen over time.  The recourse today is to call Adobe's customer support people if there's a problem.

     

    Something that's rarely discussed:  What would happen if Adobe just went out of business, and its activation servers were no longer available online?

     

    Food for thought when considering the words "perpetual" and "forever".

     

    -Noel

     
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