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PPD: Adobe missing

Aug 9, 2012 2:12 AM

Tags: #ppd

I'm following POD printer's instructions for creating a PDF. Rather than use the Adobe PDF output option of InDesign, the printers advise that a postscript file be created first, then processed in Acrobat Distiller for the final pdf.

 

The first step in printing the ps file from ID requires that in the print dialog box under PPD, an Adobe PDF be selected, however, the only option in the menu box is "Device Independent". What needs to be done?

 

A quick forum search returned similar but somewhat more complicated scenarios. I'm using CS3 and Windows 7. Thank you in advance.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2012 4:57 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    This printer is living in the early 1990's. Export your PDF using the X/1-a setting and I can pretty much assure you they'll accept your PDF.

     

    Bob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2012 5:20 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    GOLD STANDARD? Sure, like the Model T is the gold standard for automobiles.

     

    Bob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2012 5:33 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    Since you are using Windows you can compress the distillationinto a single process by choosing Print > Adobe PDF... and select their settings file. THis makes the .ps file and passes it to distiller seamlessly in the background in one operation.

     

    Which is not to say that this is a good workflow.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2012 9:22 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    Because that’s what created it.

     

     

     

    Bob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2012 9:49 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    Peter was referring to the print to Adobe PDF command, not exporting.

     

     

     

    Bob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 21, 2013 9:03 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    Reader is, as its name implies designed for READING PDFs. If you want professional level preflighting you’re going to need Acrobat X Pro.

     

     

     

    BTW, you should start paying attention to the calendar. Until August 31 you can move to Creative Cloud at a 40% discount. Until 12/31 you can get upgrade pricing for CS6.

     

     

     

    After that you’re going to have to pay full price for what ever you decide to do.

     

     

    Bob

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2012 11:50 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    Following the most recent instructions from the printers, going from ID, exporting to PDF X-1a:2001 is now recommended...

     

    I'm attempting to follow the printer's instructions and use Distiller, which at this point, I'm not seeing how to do. Is Distiller required for the preflight checks?

     

    If the most recent recommendation is exporting to PDF/X-1a, why are you using Distiller?

     

    The PDF/X-1a standard is very strict (no transparency, CMYK only) so you can pre flight in ID before the export.

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
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    Aug 10, 2012 2:42 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    Frankly, Distiller's function is not clear to me;

     

    There's none. They are askng you to Export not distill.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 2:55 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    Yup, standard export for print PDF using either the PDF/X-1a or X3 preset, then use the tools in Acrobat Pro to check the basics. Unless you've turned off the warning, ID will have told you on export that you used a restricted font that it could not embed, so fonts are generally not an issue, and you can read the "effective resolution" for any image in the info panel or the link information, or set a warning in live preflight in ID. You can also set a total ink limit preview in the Separations Preview panel to highlight any area at or above the setting So if you set 240%, it will highlight 240% and higher). One or two perpcent over the recommndation is not a problem in most cases -- you get at least that much variation on press -- and even more in very small areas is usually OK. You want to avoid overloading the paper in large areas like backgrounds.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 3:16 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    luca del carlo wrote:

     

    In their instructions above, the PDF producer is listed as Distillier, so it is indeed a part of the process at some point.

    The only reference to Distiller in what you posted above is your own. In the File submission guide they have on their site (http://www1.lightningsource.com/ops/files/pod/LSI_FileCreationGuide.pd f) with a date of Aug 7, 2012, they explicitly say to use Export from both ID and Quark. I find three references to Distiller in that PDF, all on the Quick Reference pages in the front, and all under PDF producer. I think it would be much clearer if instead of a comma they used the word "or" to separate distiller from Export from ID.

     

    Most programs don't have their own complete PDF library, the way ID has, and the point of this specification, I believe, is to make clear to you that if you don't use ID you should be using Distiller, not some other third-party PDF converter. Haven't used Quark in years, but back in the days when I did their PDF export was crap and you had to print to file and distill if you wanted a printable file. The guide is implying that is no longer necessary, so either they got their act together finally, or Quark is lying and actually distilling in the background like using Print to PDF with ID.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 4:24 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    That's probably a poor choice of illustration. My guess would be that the dialog came from a PDF printed to the virual PDF printer in before it disappeared in Snow Leopard, and is in contrast to the directions that you should export. It's a tribute to you that you looked so closely, but the the illustration is meant to show you where to check the document dimensions, and nothing else. THere's no mention of Distiller anywhere in the text of that PDF.

     

    It's always a good idea to preflight in Acrobat, since it's the PDF you are sending, but if you've done your preflights in ID and followed the specs, there's virually no reason other than user error why you would find a problem in Acrobat.

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
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    Aug 10, 2012 4:24 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    This is a good time to verify that the barcode used is

    100% black only and that your cover does not have large

    areas of color that exceed 240% Total Area Coverage.

     

    Scanning through their guide I don't see any profile recommendation. In their screen caps they've used the default US SWOP which has a 300% limit, so any photo with full tonal range will have areas of 300% coverage.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 4:33 AM   in reply to Rob Day

    Yeah, I didn't want to get into that.

     

    240% is pretty low. My guess is the print is being done on a toner-based device of some sort and more than 240% is not going to fuse properly and will flake off, but I don't have any real evidence to support that.

     

    240% is going to be pretty washed out in the shadows.

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
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    Aug 10, 2012 7:03 AM   in reply to Peter Spier

    Yeah, I didn't want to get into that.

     

    If you follow all of their preflight instructions it would come up whenever there's a typical photo on a page. You'd have to use a newsprint or legacy profile to stay under. They'd be rejecting most jobs if 240 was a real limit.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 7:11 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    This is one reason I hate these types of organizations. They publish all sorts of confusing, conflicting, or just plain erroneous guidelines for inexperienced users, and there's nobody you can talk to to get a straight answer.

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,122 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 7:18 AM   in reply to luca del carlo

    It's actually pretty hard to make a decent separation with a 240 limit if you're printing on a coated sheet. This SWOP separation, which is hardly heavy in the shadows has a fair amount over 240:

     

    Screen shot 2012-08-10 at 10.07.39 AM.png

     

    Screen shot 2012-08-10 at 10.07.53 AM.png

     
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