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myk0723
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Glock logo

Aug 8, 2012 11:17 AM

Does photoshop do 3-D logos? Like this one?nuglock.jpg

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 8, 2012 11:19 AM   in reply to myk0723

    CS6 Extended should be able to do that. There's a 30-days trial you can download.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 8, 2012 1:16 PM   in reply to myk0723

    I made this just by fooling around with Photoshop's 3D facilities for a little while.

     

    myk0723.jpg

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 8, 2012 1:17 PM   in reply to myk0723

    The 2D Glock logo is a simple design (download a Glock brochure for an accurate reference) which you could recreate with vector paths then extrude to a 3D solid for rendering. You can do the path work in Photoshop, but it would be much easier in a drafting app. I don't want to specify non-Adobe products in this forum, though.

     

    The Glock logo will be copyrighted, of course.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 8, 2012 1:27 PM   in reply to myk0723

    You should avoid a class that's specific to Photoshop CS5, and see if you can find one for CS6 as the 3D facilities have changed.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 8, 2012 2:03 PM   in reply to myk0723

    myk0723 wrote:

     

    GIMP or Blender?

     

    No. In any case, I already said that I will not specify non-Adobe products in this forum. I like to help, but this forum is hosted by Adobe.

     

    Photoshop can be used for drawing the 2D logo. My point was only that there are other apps which make such work easier. Then you use Photoshop to extrude the 2D paths to a 3D mesh and to render the image.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 8, 2012 3:04 PM   in reply to myk0723

    Posting your literal email address leaves you wide open to spambots that harvest addresses from web sites. If an administrator has not already removed your address, do so immediately. In future, whenever posting your addresss, obfuscate it and provide instructions for a human to reconstruct it. For example, write something like:

     

    "reverse the first word: zlezzup at comporium dot net"

     

    Your apparent lack of awareness of basic internet security means that I won't be emailing you for fear that my address will be deluged with spam as a result of the spyware that your computer seems likely to contain. I advise you to get your computer security sorted out by a knowledgable friend or a professional.

     

    Edit: OK, admin has removed the literal address. My advice remains.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 8, 2012 4:34 PM   in reply to myk0723

    myk0723 wrote:

     

    What, then exactly, is email for?

     

    What don't you understand?

     

    I never suggested that email is for, or not for, any particular use.

     

    I did advise you not to post a literal email address which will be harvested for spamming. I suggested a way to obfuscate an address from bots. An admin simultaneously changed your address from its literal form to an obfuscated form to protect your account for you.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 9, 2012 8:50 PM   in reply to myk0723

    myk0723 wrote:

     

    Noel, you were correct in that the 3-D glock logo is not nearly as simple as it looks. I emailed the Instructor and was informed that a CS5 class environment, without on-line tutorials, will probably not work for the type of logos I want. To "duplicate it exactly in CS5 would be extremely difficult, if not impossible". Kind of like driving in a railroad spike with a ball-peen hammer. So as not to rattle anyone on the forum in particular, he did recomment I could start it in Photoshop but need to finish it in another software package, which, by the way, is not a competitor of Adobe. Evidently, the translucence of the glass, colors within it, and beveling angles are not really PhotoShops forte. It is called PHOTOshop for a reason. Thanks much for your suggestions and helping me.

     

    You've failed to understand both Noel and me.

     

    Noel did not say the logo is not simple. That's not surprising since the logo is obviously simple.

     

    Noel's advice was that you learn CS6 instead of CS5.

     

    CS6 Extended does translucent (and refractive) glass. It's a piece of cake to add bevels to an extrusion in CS6 Extended.

     

    My very first response to you was that CS6 Extended would do the job.

     

    Good luck with CS5.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 10, 2012 6:07 AM   in reply to conroy

    conroy2009 wrote:

     

    Noel did not say the logo is not simple. That's not surprising since the logo is obviously simple.

     

    Noel's advice was that you learn CS6 instead of CS5.

     

     

    Exactly right.  Thank you for commenting, Conroy.  I thought that actually showing that I could make a similar-looking logo out of Mikey's own username would make that obvious.  With a bit more tweaking it could be made even better looking than the Glock effort.  There are a number of extrusion features I didn't exercise.

     

    Now, that's not to say operating Photoshop's 3D facilities is trivial - I have a lot of experience with Photohop, though I've never used its 3D capabilities before version CS6.  But it's doable, and I'll wager to say anyone with some time on their hands, a computer with a capable GPU, and a willingness to experiment could do better than I did.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 11:46 AM   in reply to myk0723

    Hi,

     

    The only thing that I can think of which Ps rendering can't match is the caustics in the colored shadow (and in this example it's a very subtle detail, if present at all). Ps supports reflection, transparancy and refraction, as well as IBL lighting, soft shadows, and ambient occlusion.

     

    As far as instruction for this specific use case, you're much better off looking for online tutorials and self-experimentation of the 3D features in Ps CS6 (as Noel mentions CS5 is very different and much more frustrating for 3D extrusions and Ray Trace rendering performance).

     

    Once you've settled on materials, lighting, and camera view, applying those as presets to new extrusions will be very easy. The bottleneck will be rendering out final artwork for each (you'll want many cores, fast CPU, and significant RAM).

     

    regards,

    steve 

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 10, 2012 11:59 AM   in reply to SG...

    SG, out of curiosity, I have had some trouble getting the color of transparent things to be dark enough, and have used Adjustment Layers over the top of the rendered 3D layer to make them look dark enough (e.g., deep red).  Do you have any suggestions?

     

    As an example, here's the darkest I could make a transparent rendering:

     

    RugerRendering.jpg

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 2:56 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Hi Noel,

     

    A quick thing to check is the Shine value and make sure it is in the upper range, and so decreasing any glare you might get from the lighting. If that doesn't change things, the biggest factor is your material opacity setting. At 20%, you're really cutting out saturation.

     

    There's lots of other things to try, but the above are the quickest things I've found.

     

    regards,

    steve

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 10, 2012 3:51 PM   in reply to SG...

    Thanks.  I was going for more of a "smoked glass" appearance, and that seems to need the opacity to be down a good bit.

     

    I was thinking it seemed logical that choosing a dark color would help with that, but it doesn't seem to.  However, it's possible to find an opacity value in the 25% to 35% range that gives a bit better saturation.  Bottom line seems to be that the rendering seems to need post-rendering help to be truly like smoked glass.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 4:11 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel, is your model reflecting a uniform white environment? That would contribute to the bleached appearance, I'd suspect.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 10, 2012 4:47 PM   in reply to conroy

    Actually, I think it's the transparency more than anything else.  There doesn't seem to be a direct way to have something be very transparent, but dark - as smoked glass would be.  If I increase the opacity it gets plenty dark and with plenty of color saturation - just as steve showed above - but then it doesn't look as much like clear glass.  I even tried turning down the intensity of the lights to no avail.

     

    Or am I missing the crux of your question?

     

    I'm glad Mike created this thread; it's prompted me to fool around more with the 3D capabilities.  I can see that this is going to be helpful for a lot of things, inasmuch as I loved Layer Styles before (can you tell from my Avatar?). 

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 5:00 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    Actually, I think it's the transparency more than anything else ...

     

    Or am I missing the crux of your question?

     

     

     

    My point was that a uniform white environment seems likely to contribute to a bleached appearance when it is being both reflected from every unoccluded point on a surface as well as being transmitted through the semi-transparent material.

     

     

    I'm glad Mike created this thread; it's prompted me to fool around more with the 3D capabilities.  I can see that this is going to be helpful for a lot of things, inasmuch as I loved Layer Styles before (can you tell from my Avatar?). 

     

    -Noel

     

    Yes, for sure. The thread prompted me to return for a another play around with the 3D features. Having fun (when not scratching my head).

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 10, 2012 5:37 PM   in reply to conroy

    In the Environment section, I've tried an Image Base Light color from black to dark red to white, and yes, with white it's even more washed out.  But at 10% to 30% opacity it's washed out with even a black IBL.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 7:01 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Hi,

     

    Another thing that will darken the 'glass' is putting an object behind it.

     

    render2.png

    I couldn't wait for the full render to finish which accounts for the noisier foreground. I choose a quick squashed cylinder to show the difference. A seamless backdrop mesh would look better in practice.

     

    regards,

    steve

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 10, 2012 9:22 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Here's a block of red glass with a tunnel cut through from left to right. There is a single white panel illuminant beyond it to the left in a black environment.

     

    It would look more realistic if the light was progressively absorbed as it travelled inside the material - Beer's law.

     

    Screen-shot-2012-08-11-at-04.53.22.png

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 11, 2012 6:27 AM   in reply to conroy

    Thanks, Steve and Conroy.

     

    Since Mike appeared to be wanting to match a logo done with a pure white background, I strove to do so.  It appears, as Conroy has pointed out, that to make a realistic looking glass thing there has to be stuff to reflect off it, as well as some help (e.g,. a Hue/Sat layer and/or Curves) to darken the result, so it can be made to look fairly clear.

     

     

    RugerLogo3D.jpg

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 11, 2012 5:50 PM   in reply to myk0723

    Yes, all done in Photoshop CS6.  Here's the PSD file if you'd like a copy.  It has no IBL (Image Based Lighting) yet.  I've been experimenting with that today, and would add some nice reflection highlights on the bevels and inside the glass.

     

    http://Noel.ProDigitalSoftware.com/ForumPosts/RugerLogo3D.psd

     

    Better have a screamin' meany of a computer to do the rendering.  It can take a while!

     

    I've just been scratching the surface so far, learning as I go.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 11, 2012 7:46 PM   in reply to myk0723

    As an overview, I found a Ruger logo online, used the Magic Wand to make a selection out of the red part, then extruded that using Photoshop's 3D menu.  After that it's been all discovery and experimentation with the various settings, to see what they do and to get familiar with them.

     

    There's no way I'm going to be able to take you through the process step by step.  For the most part you're going to have to use the system and experiment with it to see how it works.  And read all the threads here on 3D, including Conroy's one on Caustic Doughnuts.

     

    I've updated the logo to include Image Based Lighting from the samples Adobe provides online.  How does this look with some nice highlights on the bevels?

     

    RugerUpdatedLogo.jpg

     

    As Conroy has pointed out, adding the IBL has radically increased the size of the PSD, so I'd rather not post it online.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 11, 2012 9:30 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Tell me this doesn't kick the butt of that Glock logo you posted at the top of this thread...

     

    RugerLogo3D.jpg

     

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 12, 2012 5:10 AM   in reply to myk0723

    No problem, but to be fair it's not mine either - it's Ruger's.

     

    I have a little Ruger Mark I Target Model .22 that's the most accurate weapon I've ever shot.  I've won pistol matches with it.  It groups in about 1 inch square at 75 feet, no kidding.  They make decent hardware.

     

    -Noel

     
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