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Win 7 refuses to open jpg in Photoshop using explorer

Jul 11, 2012 11:58 PM

Tags: #and #acrobat #pdf #open #explorer #in #to #select #using #convert #the #when #file. #jpegs

Recently I installed an update to Corel X6 after I had updated CS6 of Photoshop. Now despite choosing Photoshop as the default application, jpgs open in Acrobat.

 

Just choosing Photoshop as the default application doesn't change anything. They still open in Acrobat unless I first start Photoshop and open the file I want. Can anyone tell me the registry key to fix this please?

 

R.

 
Replies
  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Jul 12, 2012 4:51 AM   in reply to Ryadia™

    Try going into Adobe Bridge CS6, choosing Edit - Preferences - File Type Associations and either setting the specific type association you want or using the big [ Reset to Default Associations ] button.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jul 12, 2012 5:04 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    Are you going to Control Panel > Programs >Default Programs > Set Associations

    or either get there by typing "file association" in the search box?

     

    When you highlight the .jpg (.jp2, .jpe, .jpeg, .jpg) and press "Change program,"  nothing happens?  Are you logged in as administrator?  If none of these work, I'd reboot into Safe Mode and try to change it before other programs get their "hooks" into play.

     

    Tom

     
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    Jul 13, 2012 2:10 AM   in reply to Ryadia™

    Follow the instructions described in this thread http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-files/file- association-fix-for-windows-7/2120d7eb-3f9d-464b-bff9-8b5132e72b3a

     

    If Photoshop is not in the list of programs you see you can opt to browse your hard disk for the program you want.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Jul 13, 2012 7:47 AM   in reply to Ryadia™

    I should ask:  Did you log off Windows and back on again after making the change?

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jul 13, 2012 8:34 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Ryadia,

    It's still not clear to me that you are following my or acresofgreen's suggestions.  This change should be effected within the "Set Associations" window.  If no Adobe program is listed, then you press the "Change program" button.  Here you don't right click anything then in explorer!  You navagate to the actual photoshop.exe file on your hard drive and choose it. 

     
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    Jul 14, 2012 2:47 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    I suspect it was caused by using a registry cleaner to defrag the registry but I guess I'll never really know for sure.

     

    Not that long ago, I downloaded and used a very highly-recommended cleanup utility, rather than my "go-to" one. I let it do its thing, and then had to do Repair Installs for most of my Adobe Production Studio! Teach me to deviate. My regular cleanup utility always wants to do a full Registry backup, and I let it. To date, it has never messed up. I once had similar issues with another utility, that just flat did not like things about Adobe products. It went into the trash pretty quickly. Yes, stuff CAN happen.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Jul 14, 2012 5:15 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    >Well Noel ... That's a new one on me. I wasn't aware when changing

    >a program's default file types you had to log off and on.

     

    You normally don't have to but I have run across systems where Explorer fails to accept changes until restarted.  I've always suspected I'll-behaved Shell Extensions in that problem.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jul 14, 2012 6:26 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    I'm glad you were able to fix things!  You might post the registry entry for other people who stumble across this thread.

     
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    Aug 15, 2012 9:40 AM   in reply to Ryadia™

    Fine, but, as stormy boy says, why haven't you posted the registry entry to help the rest of us?

     
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    Aug 15, 2012 12:20 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt wrote:

     

    Not that long ago, I downloaded and used a very highly-recommended cleanup utility, rather than my "go-to" one. I let it

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

    Bill,what is your "go to" clean up utility? While I am leary about registry cleaners,I understand there are reliable ones. I like CCleaner by Piriform,but I'm open to suggestions.

     

    Gene

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 15, 2012 12:41 PM   in reply to gener7

    Gene, what problem do you feel you need to solve with a "registy cleaner"?  Just curious.

     

    On my main workstation I'm running a Windows 7 system that was installed in 2009, and I use hell out of it every day.  It's still as fast and reliable as when it was new (more so actually for several reasons) and I've never needed nor used a registry cleaner. 

     

    The Windows registry is not something that needs "cleaning".  It's a made up market.

     

    That's not to say Windows doesn't need some maintenance to be kept at its best, but this is mostly already handled (it regularly defrags its disks all on its own, for example), and what's left is limited to clearing out TEMP area files and managing what application software is slated to run when you log in.  The former is simple Explorer work, and the latter is best handled with a free tool called AutoRuns, which lets you review everything that's set to start, and disable items you don't need.  That's necessarily an interactive task, since a registry cleaner application can't know what you want running and what you can do without.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Aug 15, 2012 1:27 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Thanks for the response,Noel. I guess I had thought cleaning the registry was a maintenance since some uninstallers leave keys or file associations around.  At least that what I thought the point of running one is.  But to be honest,while I was told it was a good idea I never came across anything definite on whether doing so made a second of performance difference. I'm also aware reg cleaners can make bad judgement calls just like virus checkers,although I'm not sure that's happened to me.

     

    What TEMP directories should I be cleaning out and which are best left alone? I simply use the Windows Disk Cleanup Utility.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 15, 2012 2:16 PM   in reply to gener7

    The Disk Cleanup Utility is all you need, really.

     

    Look for the environment variable named TEMP on your system to see where your main TEMP folder is.

     

    I suggest looking into virtualization (i.e., the creation of virtual Windows machines) to support your needs for installing and testing things, vs. installing and uninstalling a lot of stuff on your main system.  VMware makes some good products (I use VMware workstation).

     

    -Noel

     
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    Aug 15, 2012 3:43 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    I found the Temp file and cleared over 700MB of filles out of that.  Strange,I would have thought Disk Cleanup would take care of that.

     

    Anyway I upgraded to a Dell 15R/5520 i5-3210M. I've been waiting for this new generation Intel CPU for the USB 3 ports and the HD4000 integrated graphics.

     

    In any case all the installs,upgrades and backups are all done so I want to use this laptop and not do more than necessary.  That's the old "if ain't broke,don't fix it" wisdom.

     

    Anyhow,thanks for your advice.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 16, 2012 5:52 AM   in reply to Ryadia™

    Ryadia™ wrote:

     

    One of the most significant services on the registry you need to perform at least every few months  is to defragment it.

     

    What makes you think so?  It's simply not necessary.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Aug 16, 2012 1:42 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    What is the product you are talking about,Ryadia? It wouldn't hurt for me to do research and see whether or not I can use it.

     

    Gene

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 16, 2012 2:57 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    LOL, Ryadia, as a career computer/software engineer I'll wager I know more about Windows than most of the billion Windows users on the planet.  I also use my workstations harder than most.  Ever wonder how I can develop software, run a company, and still have time to be here?  It's because I'm not futzing around with my computers - they just work day in and day out, efficiently and without fault, doing any number of things I ask them to do.

     

    And honestly I do hope I have gravely insulted the writers of snake oil products who mislead users!

     

    I don't blame you for being duped into buying it - their marketing is very good - and I'm sorry if I've insulted you. 

     

    It's just something you don't need, and I "tell the users on this forum" because I have the knowledge, intelligence, and experience going back to the days before Microsoft even existed to back up what I write.  I even know the internals of the VMS operating system Dave Cutler created before creating Windows NT in its image, so not only do I know how things work but in many cases why they work that way.  I even have some popular books published on the subject of configuring and running Windows to get real work done.

     

    But hey, it's not my money you're wasting on registry and TEMP folder maintenance.  I truly hope the product does no harm for you and makes you feel better about using your computers.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Aug 16, 2012 3:25 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    The registry is a database - it doesn't really get "fragmented".

     

    And most of the utilities that offer to "clean your registry" are just so much snake oil (though some are malware acting as a trojan download).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 16, 2012 3:47 PM   in reply to Ryadia™

    Perhaps the OP would now want to unmark their own answer as correct. 

     

    If not, perhaps Admin should. 

     
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