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Which i7 should I get

Sep 1, 2012 8:29 AM

Looks like the Intel Core i7-2600K is a good option but what arev the other options?  What cheaper CPUs are worth considering and what more expensive ones. 

 

I currently have a i5 3550 so it needs to be significantly better and socket LGA1155.

 

Ben

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 1, 2012 8:39 AM   in reply to funkytwig

    Ben,

     

    It would help if you could share what your goals are. Will you be primarily editing with Premiere Pro, or is this a multi-purpose PC? DO you edit as a hobby, or as a profession? How long do you usually go between updates?

     
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    Sep 1, 2012 8:49 AM   in reply to funkytwig

    I do not know if the CS5 Benchmark http://ppbm5.com/ allows you to sort/search by motherboard type... but you might go there and see what people are using for that type of CPU (again, if you are able to search for that information)

     
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    Sep 1, 2012 8:55 AM   in reply to funkytwig

    Ben,

     

    Check out Harm's excellent post regarding what level of system you need for what codec's you will be editing:

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/947698

     

    Even consumers may need a pretty powerful cpu to edit the ever-so-common AVCHD consumer HD formats.

     

    Regarding the i7-2600k cpu, it has huge potential as bang-for-the-buck and equipped with 16GB of RAM and at least 3 hard drives it should do pretty well with AVCHD. If you provide it with a good cpu cooler, it overclocks very easily and safely and works even better.

     

    Regards,

     

    Jim

     
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    Sep 1, 2012 12:35 PM   in reply to funkytwig

    Ben,

     

    I would not just say get the best cpu you can afford. I would suggest you put the best mix of your budget towards cpu, RAM, and drives. Premiere Pro is good at taxing all areas of the computer and your resulting performance will be impacted in many ways by the proverbial weakest link.

     

    What is your budget?

     

    What drives do you have now?

     

    Jim

     
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    Sep 2, 2012 6:51 AM   in reply to funkytwig

    Ben,

     

    I have seen your result in the PPBM5 list. The disk I/O performance is the most serious weak point in your system, accounting for 344 seconds out of the total time of 606 seconds. You have two disks total - and both of those disks are very likely to be old designs that can't sustain even 100 MB/s even on the outer tracks. As such, you need to upgrade your disks to newer drives first - and then, get more disks. A properly tuned editing system needs four or five newer hard disks just to perform well.

     

    In addition, there is a possibility that you might be running too many processes in the background. One of the biggest offenders is antivirus programs that eat up more resources. Excessive background processes will degrade disk I/O performance, in addition to old-generation disks.

     

    After the disks, I would add more RAM, then upgrade the CPU, and finally the GPU (in order of preference). Based on my own testing, even 16GB of RAM isn't quite enough for Premiere Pro CS6. In fact, my main system (an i7-2600K at stock 3.4GHz) needed more than 280 seconds to complete the PPBM5 benchmark with 16GB; I had to add another 8GB (making the total 24GB) just to knock 60 seconds (one full minute) off of that time. With that i5, you might have to go all the way to 32GB of RAM just to compensate for the lack of Hyperthreading on that CPU.

     

    All of the above assumes that you're running Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate x64 on your PC. If on the other hand you're running Windows 7 Home Premium, you're stuck with this level of performance (other than the improvements from the non-RAM upgrades) because Home Premium cannot address more than 16GB total RAM (the total RAM as shown in properties would read "32GB; 16GB Usable").

     
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    Sep 2, 2012 11:04 AM   in reply to funkytwig

    Thanks, Ben. Even with that RAID 0, the slow disk I/O performance leads me to one thing: Your system just isn't properly tuned. You might have missing drivers, or you might have been using Microsoft's software RAID driver instead of the Intel RST driver, or you might have had too many background programs running. Open up the Task Manager, and you will see how many processes that you have running. On a system that's being used as a multipurpose PC, don't be surprised that there are well over 100 processes going on. A properly tuned editing PC should have fewer than 50 processes going on.

     

    Properly tuned, that i5-3550 PC should have achieved a total result of around 340 seconds instead of 606 seconds.

     
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