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Aug 23, 2012 10:27 AM

  Latest reply: Bill Hunt, Sep 18, 2012 5:21 PM
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 7, 2012 11:37 AM   in reply to able123

    Rod,

     

    Those "certification courses" sound like a great way to go.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 7, 2012 2:15 PM   in reply to able123

    Anyway, I might start the first course around November when winter sets in around here.

    Provided that they have heat, sounds like a good way to spend a Saturday.

     

    Not sure how many grants might be available in this day and age, but I would check that sourse out too. Might be some $'s, just waiting for a video production?

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 7, 2012 4:59 PM   in reply to able123

    Rod,

     

    In general terms, what IS the history of Mound, MN?

     

    I would guess that Native Americans were at least among the first settlers.

     

    Any Viking exploration in the area? I can just see a ghost Viking dragon boat, rising from the lake in the mist...

     

    What brought more contemporary settlers there?

     

    Were they an agrarian culture, or did they perhaps open up a lumber mill, or other industry?

     

    Cannot recall, but did the railroad play any role in the development? Didn't the downtown move to go to where the railroad came through?

     

    Often, the "why" an area developed is worth mentioning. Take Tucumcari, NM for instance. It was once a work town, for the railroad and the building of a dam, but became a recreational town, and motels sprang up everywhere. It has also been used (or at least its environs have) for several motion pictures. Being on old Rt. 66 did not hurt either. Stuff like that.

     

    As this is the 100th Anniversary of Mound, there should be a wealth of historical material, and people, who are interested in such.

     

    Just thinking,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 7, 2012 7:24 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    See http://minnesotahistory.net/?p=1644 for more on mounds

     

    I bet you thought I was kidding about the burial sites

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 7, 2012 7:49 PM   in reply to Jerry Klaimon

    Oh no, I believed you completely.

     

    Though not on the MS Gulf Coast, there were many Native American burial mounds, just up-state from where I grew up. As, with the exception of the MS banks of the Mississippi River, there are few geographical features in the state, those mounds were a glaring exception.

     

    Somewhere (and obviously due to Rod's post), I seem to recall that archeologist place the origin of the mounds to before the Native American tribes, thought to be indigenous to the region, and by maybe 1,000 years. Sort of like the Native Americans in Arizona. There was a "lost tribe," the Ho`hokam, who predated the Navajo, the Zuni and others, but disappeared from the area, maybe 600 years before they arrived. For decades, many dismissed the existence of the Ho`hokam, until a surveyor found their irrigation canals.The term "hokam" was used to denote "bunk." Well, not so. Like the Anasazi for Colorado, they were there, but disappeared, prior to what most think of as the indigenous Native American tribes, like the Arapaho, and Plains. Mesa Verde is a great example of their culture.

     

    Also, as Lake Minnetonka was possibly a glacial moraine, I could imagine even earlier tribes, that were there, before the last Ice Age, and perhaps left the area, as the glaciers came down. I would anticipate that most of their artifacts were scoured from the land. I'll let Rod trace human life in the area back to whenever.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 9:35 AM   in reply to able123

    I can well imagine that with the streams, feeding into the lakes, that beaver would have been plentiful, and as about that time, fur felt hats were the rage in Europe, fur-trappers would be swarming all over the area.

     

    However, it's easy to assign attributes, and common history to one area, based solely on similarities to another, like WY, or ID, to MN. Things might well have been different, and beyond my knowledge.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 9:42 AM   in reply to able123

    Somewhere, I had run across the general timeline on the Native Americans in the area, but the "building atop" was new to me.

    from what I've read and been told etc... the mounds are indeed pre-dating the Dakota...but some mounds had Dakato at the tops of the mounds as well... Like they 'added' to the more ancient mounds with their own deceased. The differences are apparently seen by the way they were arranged and the artifacts that accompany them, and the methods ( some cremated, some not etc ).

    Kind of like the "new owners" adding a penthouse, atop an existing building. I would puzzle over how the Dakota knew the purpose of those existing mounds, as there was no coincidence with both cultures? It's easy, when it's just the linear development of ONE culture, like Native Hawai`ians, where the "talk stories" of the heiaus were passed along. Think about it. The Dakota came to a new land/place, found the mounds, and knew what they were. They then just "added-on" to the existing mounds. How did they know?

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Mitchell Lopez
    259 posts
    Jul 8, 2004
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 10:57 AM   in reply to able123

    Maybe you can get Kevin Costner to star in your movie and make the movie 6 hours long.

     

    You could show him as a civil war vet who wants to be on the frontier, away from civilization.  He goes to Mound and turns rogue and finds how peaceful life is on the prairie with the native population. 

     

    I don’t think this concept has been done.

     

    If you do it, you probably will get rich from the residuals, when it is shown on TV every other week.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 1:19 PM   in reply to able123

    So the Dakota, not being idiots, would see that someone 'lived' or hunted or something near some of the mounds. That would lead to checking out the mounds themselves, and using them for their own purposes etc. 

    That is basically what happened in and around Phoenix. Jack Swilling looked down upon the valley, and became convinced that he saw a network of canals, though they had partially filled in, and had become overgrown over centuries. He investigate further, and charted those "canals," discovering that they WERE canals, and that they had been constructed to carry water from the Rio Salado, and disperse it all around the valley. The concept of the Central Arizona Project was born, and the canals were re-dug. Their grades were still almost perfect. The local Native American population knew nothing of the canals, but speculated that they had been constructed by an earlier, long-gone tribe, referred to as the Hohokam. Nothing was known of the Hohokam, except for myth. Well, the myth turned out to be historical fact. The story reminds me a bit of the Nazca Plain in Peru, where there are pieces of artwork, that can only be appreciated from a higher elevation, or the air. It took a visual survey from a peak, to even see the canals.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 1:23 PM   in reply to Mitchell Lopez

    Mitchell,

     

    Maybe the title could be, Dances with Wolverines?

     

    As a plot twist, Costner could build the first "tourist destination" in Mound, after he sees dead people, who tell him to "build it... "

     

    Yeah, you might be onto something there.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 1:28 PM   in reply to able123

    That reminds me...maybe bolero has finally finished playing on the classical station and I can turn it back on ???

    What, you are not a fan of Maurice Ravel? Maybe you need to hear Wendy Carlos' version to gain an appreciation?

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 1:47 PM   in reply to able123

    OK, here's the hook. You tell the story from the POV perspective of a wolverine. Maybe suit him up with a "critter cam," for some unscripted shots?

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 8, 2012 6:16 PM   in reply to able123

    Hey, just trying to "broaden" your horizons. Got to get into different types of music man!

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 16, 2012 2:28 PM   in reply to able123

    During the heyday of RR tourism, there were many spur lines built to various attractions. In New Orleans, they had Smoky Mary: http://pontchartrain.net/491284

     

    After those glory days, many of the spur routes were dismantled for scrap, and especially during WWII, when steel and iron were cherished commodities. Some, however remain, or have been reclaimed, and operate as "excursion" RR's.

     

    Now, that last shot is a real gem! Normally, when a RR line (spur or not) ends, they put a "deadman" in place. Hope that the engineer sees that stop sign in time...

     

    Wow, Lake Minnetonka is a bigger deal, than I imagined. I know that you have posted some topo-maps, and I've spent a bit of time on Google, but I guess that I just never had the full grasp of things up there.

     

    Now, I do not want to hear of you putting AZ plates on your car, and starting an anti-Zonie movement up there too. Of course Mitchell would have great fun, if you did.

     

    Enjoy. Seems like a very cool place.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 9:23 AM   in reply to able123

    Old RR grades can be very useful indeed. In Colorado, we had several in the High Country. After the tracks were torn out, a few became 4-wheel drive roads (actually, as the % of grade was low, and even with narrow-gauge, the curves fairly gentle, one did not really need 4-wheel, so long as the auto had clearance for the rocks, that had fallen onto the pass). Hagerman Pass was one such neat "road." Also, all along those, were old structures, such as water towers, etc., to view and explore. Mountain bikers discovered them early on, and the "invention" of the mountain bike came to be to ride such trails outside of Crested Butte.

     

    Being a RR buff, I always find the old right-of-ways, and grades interesting. The histories of those old RR lines are the stuff of coffee table books, and one could find hundreds at the Colorado RR Museum in Golden, CO (just down from Coors!). I have many, though one of my Bulldogs did chew on a few.

     

    I understand the fragmentation of the historical societies' focus. The RR folk are anal about all things RR, while the architectural folk have a different subject. Then, you'll get another group, that wants to chronicle the china pattern for every old resort. Getting them together is worse than herding cats. Now, if you can get them together for a study on the china patterns of a RR depot, you might get consensus. That is kind of what happened with La Posada in Winslow, AZ: http://www.laposada.org/. When they DO get focused, great things can come about.

     

    Good luck, and most of all, ENJOY!

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2012 2:27 PM   in reply to able123

    Well, based on some of the cave drawings, and petroglyphs, "pictures" have been around for a bit.

     

    Now, one person, with whom you must speak, before you do that much of the script is the Log Lady: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Log_Lady

     

    I think that before she moved to the Pacific Northwest, she had a cabin on Lake Minnetonka?

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2012 5:21 PM   in reply to able123

    You make a good point. We need a "Scary Snakes, Log Lady and Big Green Frog" Discussion! http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1068183?tstart=0

     

    Hunt

     
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