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Interested in learning / hotel rooms

Sep 1, 2012 11:36 PM

Tags: #blend #hotel #training_course #interior

I am interested in learning how to make hotel rooms very inviting and look incredible.  There is a local photographer that chages 1g per shot to a local hotel. They look incredible.  I know he take a lot of photos through the day evening and at sunset and blends them later.  Can anyone direct me to a course or how I can learn how to do the same thing?

I am using CS5.5 Photoshop.

 

thanks in advance (would apply to any interior - not just hotels)

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 1, 2012 11:59 PM   in reply to CS3jim

    Got any links to examples of what you have in mind?

     

    Always helps to have a visual reference.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2012 11:05 AM   in reply to CS3jim

    Any pro photographer is going to be using multiple external light sources.

    He will have several speedlights hidden throughout the room so they can provide varing amounts of light to different areas.

     

    Then he may blend the photos together to get a more natural look than the average HDR image.

    He is simply starting with better lighting and producing great images.

     

    Joe McNally has several books that discuss this. The Hotshop Diaries and The Moment it Clicks.

    No, he doesn't show how to blend hotel room photos. But he gives you a new way of thinking about light which is what photography is really about.

     

    Quick take away: you can't take photos like this with just your camera using the build in flash or a speedlight attached to the top of the camera,

    You need to invest in extra lighting like mutiple speedlights or strobes.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,471 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2012 12:42 PM   in reply to CS3jim

    A good friend of mine is a home/architecture photographer.  Her shots look inviting, complimentary, they make rooms look open and airy, and the light just feels right.  All that and she manages to avoids unnatural appearance even with wide stitches.  Attractive stuff like this:

     

    http://www.floridahomephotographer.com/large/04_Livingroom1_800Panorama.jpg

     

    My hat's off to her; I know behind the scenes how much effort she puts into working out logistics, hauling lighting equipment, setting up and executing the shots, then processing the images in the digital darkroom.  Not only does it take talent and training, but good prep, execution, and practice as well.  The results are clearly worth the effort.

     

    Best of luck!  I hope you find your footing and it becomes rewarding for you.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2012 2:58 PM   in reply to CS3jim

    No courses, but some tips:

     

    1. Study the room, and use a lighting kit, that is complementary to the design, i.e. windows, skylights, etc. Let the room "speak to you."
    2. If you opt to go with strobes, say to blend with daylight, or to use with models, then replace the incandescent bulbs with "blue bulbs."
    3. Work with a good stylist, who can provide any necessary props.
    4. Shoot with a wider angle, to increase the perception of larger space.
    5. Shoot with either 4 x 5, or a perspective-corrective lens.
    6. Watch for every detail, and leave nothing to be corrected in post-production, unless absolutely necessary.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - that price seems about right to me, depending on the market. I usually did about 4 such shots per day, when done for advertising purposes. For quicker, brochure-only work, I could often get up to 8 shots per day.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2012 3:49 PM   in reply to CS3jim

    Just want to make clear how much is 1g

    thnaks

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2012 3:54 PM   in reply to YahorShumski

    I assumed that "1g" was shorthand for 1 "grand," which translates to US $ 1,000 per shot. Perhaps I was incorrect?

     

    My day rate for advertising architectural photography was US $ 3,800/day, with assistant, all normal equipment, additional charges for a stylist, travel and materials. That was in the Denver market, though I shot for clients around the US and on locations around the world. In larger markets, I would assume higher day-rates, while in smaller markets, a lower day-rate.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,471 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 10, 2012 6:20 PM   in reply to CS3jim

    Why don't you start by taking one shot when it's bright outside and one when it's dim/dark?, then mix them creatively using layers and see what you can get.  I really don't think it's necessary to stack a whole day's worth of shots to get a decent picture of the inside of a room!

     

    -Noel

     
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