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Twisting a photo in In Design CS 5.5

Sep 11, 2012 5:49 AM

I often rotate pictures that I have "placed" ( + D) in In Design Cs 5.5.

 

They look terrible on the screen — crooked lines, etc.

 

But they don't print out that way, correct ?

 

Is there anything wrong with rotating using this method ?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 11, 2012 5:52 AM   in reply to Ceencha

    What file format are you placing? Have you turned on High Quality Display under the View menu?

     
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    Sep 11, 2012 8:41 AM   in reply to Ceencha

    A lot depends on the size and resolution of the image and the printer resolution. You might get slightly better results rotating in Photoshop, but probably not much.

     
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    Sep 11, 2012 11:06 AM   in reply to Ceencha

    With one of the images selected, open the Info panel. There are two resolutions listed. What is the Effective Resolution?

     
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    Sep 12, 2012 7:38 AM   in reply to Ceencha

    Both your screen and many printers use rectangular grids of pixels (the screen) or dots (the printer). Any hard edge that is not perfectly aligned with the grid mus therefore be rendered as a series of stepped horizontal or vertical segments because you can't light up only part of a pixel, or print only part of a dot (printers are a bit more complex because for traditional halftones each halftone spot is composed of many printer dots, some of which will be used, and some not, depending on the value of the spot, but it's always all of a printer dot that gets used or not). The higher the resolution of the output, the more steps can be included for any particular slope and distance, and the smoother it will appear.

     

    Many inkjet printers and some presses, use stochastic screening or something similar to make halftones, and that method uses uniform dot sizes with varying densities of coverage (though ultimately I think it still is a grid), so rather than a larger dot for a darker area you get lots of tiny dots packed close together, and only a few tiny dots spread apart, rather than a single small dot in lighter areas. These tend to make edge jaggies less apparent.

     
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    Sep 12, 2012 7:42 AM   in reply to Peter Spier

    Another way to think about this is to picture drawing your image on graph paper by filling in squares to make your shapes, with square being only filled or empty, never half-filled. The samller the squares for any given size of picture, the smoother the edges will appear.

     
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