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InDesign - Export PDF file size

Sep 21, 2012 1:38 PM

Hey everyone. I use InDesign to create my resume for job apps and whatnot. I've found that many corporate sites only accept file sizes under a certain limit (usually 500kb or smaller). My resume is usually around 590-610kb. Is there any way that I can reduce the file size without losing significant quality, or even any?

 

Cheers.

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 21, 2012 2:08 PM   in reply to rayzha

    Depends on waht's in the PDF and the current quality of the images.

     

    Acrobat's PDF Optimizer can remove a lot of stuff that won't be needed, and downsmaple images or flatten transparency, and there's an Audit Usage button you can use first to see what are the major contributors to file size.

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 2:25 AM   in reply to rayzha

    Well, if it's just texboxes and no images you can also try the "smallest File Size" preset when exporting to PDF.

    Maybe you can also get a lower filesize by choosing Acrobat 8/9 in the compatibility list. This will prevent any transparancy from being flattened.

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 5:12 AM   in reply to rayzha

    @rayza – you could go the other route creating PDFs: print to PostScript and use Acrobat Distiller for writing a PDF.
    This usual yields in smaller file sizes compared to the export method with a similar PDF preset: about 10 to 20%.

     

    If you have a CMYK workflow with CMYK images, converting to sRGB (not including any color profiles) should cut another portion of your file size without diminishing overall quality.

     

    Uwe

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 5:58 AM   in reply to rayzha

    rayzha wrote:

     

    So I need to d/l adobe acrobat?

    OK, so this sounds like you don't have a Creative Suite package, or perhaps you are using Creative Cloud and didn't install Acrobat Pro.

     

    The free Adobe Reader will not help you to optimize a PDF, you need the full, paid, Acrobat application. Uwe's suggestion to distill might get you a smaller PDF, but again, without Acrobat you won't have Distiller. There are a few freeware Distiller clones that would probably work for plain text, but I doubt there's much that can be done to bring the size down on a file that has nothing but text in it without removing the non-graphic disposables like metadata, and the embedded page thumbnails, which requires the optimizer.

     

    It occurs to me that one reason your exported PDF might be large is that ID always embeds fonts unless they are restricted. If you are using common system fonts that you know your viewer will have, you can distill PDF without embedding fonts and save a couple of bytes. I just pulled up a random page from a student paper, which has about seven fonts in use. The usage audit says they total a bit over 2mb.

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 7:08 AM   in reply to rayzha

    As Sirbaxx writes, try the Smallest Size preset before doing anything.

     

    I just exported a 4-page newsletter, images and all for a proof yesterday to email out. Size is 384k. A resume should hit about the 50k size with subsetted fonts.

     

    Take care, Mike

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 1:36 PM   in reply to rayzha

    I've never figured out what content streams means, but I don't think you're going to be able to reduce that, nor do you want to unembed a custom font.

     

    Make a copy of the PDF, then run through the various Optimizer screens and see what other sorts of things you can delete or compress. Pay particular attention to the three categories Discard Object Data, Discard User Data and Clean up (Flate seems to have a significant impact, in my experience).

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 1:38 PM   in reply to Peter Spier

    ns if that doesn't bring it down enough, try saving as .eps, then from the File menu, Create PDF from File and choose the .eps. This will distill and "refry" the file, and probably reduce the size as well.

     
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    Sep 23, 2012 2:29 AM   in reply to rayzha

    In addition to good Uwe's and Peter's advices:

    after you ran your pdf through Optimizer (with optimal settings for you) and saved it, export from ID again - just one page of your work, with same settings. Run it through Optimizer identically. Save it. Open your first pdf and replace corresponding page with newly exported one. Do plain save (don't optimize!).

    Strangely, the resulting file very often shows smaller size than original, just optimized. I noticed that doing small last-second corrections in already generated multipage pdf's for client.

    not a big space saver, but if you're on the edge with your file size, it might help you sometimes.

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 2:07 PM   in reply to Peter Spier

    Content streams are (apparently and largely) vector data from what I have read in the past.

     

    Culprits from eons ago use to be placed EPS files whether the EPS file(s) were from AI or PS. Deleting meta data via the Optimizer, changing smooth lines to curves, etc., will lower the file size.

     

    I would really be interested in seeing this file. I cannot imagine a resume would be so large...unless there is a lot of vector data in it.

     

    Take care, Mike

     
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    Sep 22, 2012 2:32 PM   in reply to MW Design

    MikeWenzloff wrote:

     

    I would really be interested in seeing this file. I cannot imagine a resume would be so large...unless there is a lot of vector data in it.

     

    Take care, Mike

    I would have to agree. Perhaps the OP doesn't consider native ID shapes and color bars to be graphical. Fills in a text frame might add some heavy overhead, too.

     
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    Sep 24, 2012 12:34 PM   in reply to rayzha

    Make a copy of the file and try removing the outline and see if that makes a difference.

     

    And I persoanlly wouldn't use a font from dafont.com, but that's me.

     
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    Sep 24, 2012 12:44 PM   in reply to rayzha

    > Titles which have a .5 outline to bold the text because the custom font did not have a bold version

     

    There is your vector art. Lots of this? Try without the artficial bold and see how big a difference it makes.

     
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