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Unable to start Photoshop CS6 - could not open a scratch file because the file is locked (Windows)

May 19, 2012 11:51 AM

Tags: #file #start #photoshop #bridge #open #won't #can't #locked #disk #scratch #cs6 #is

When I first installed Adobe Photoshop CS6 I was unable to run Photoshop or Bridge CS6.  Photoshop would give me an error about "could not open a scratch file because the file is locked.  If I ran either of these programs as an administrator they would run without issue, this led me to believe that there was a permission issue somewhere.  After some digging I found out the both Bridge and Photoshop try to create a temp file (similiar to Photoshop Temp2777223910092) on the c:\ drive of the computer.  In my case the user that I was logged in with did not have access to write to the root of the C:\ drive.  Note that you run the program as the administrator and change the scratch disk location as that changes the preference for the administrator user and not the user that you are currently logged in as.

 

To get around this issue I first had to give the user that I was logged on with write permissions to the root of the C:\ drive.  Next try and run Photoshop, you will get an error another error about the scratch disk and about and invalid or missing setting file.  To correct this you need to have run Photoshop as an administrator, next you can go to Users\Admin\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6\Adobe Photoshop CS6 Settings and copy Adobe Photoshop CS6 Prefs and/or Adobe Photoshop X64 CS6 Prefs to Users\<your logged in username>\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6\Adobe Photoshop CS6 Settings.

 

Photoshop and bridge should now start up with no issues.

 

I hope that this can help others out there as this caused me a great deal of frustration when upgrading to CS6.

 
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,523 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    May 19, 2012 12:00 PM   in reply to sunstonecreations

    Normally you should not have to run Photoshop As Administrator.  The installer, if coded correctly, should set up whatever permissions are needed when it is run with elevated privileges.

     

    Note that I did not say the installer is coded correctly.  Adobe really does need to deal with this - some people are clearly having permissions problems on Windows with UAC enabled.

     

    This business of writing things into the root folder of a hard drive...  Bad practice by Adobe.  What's needed is for the scratch setup dialog to allow the specification of FOLDERS, not just drives.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jun 7, 2012 1:52 PM   in reply to sunstonecreations

    As Adobe is one of the big "industry standard" software makers I really don't know where to start. Constant crashing, inconsistent workflow and stupid, stupid errors like this makes my wonder why it is "industry standard". I'm not able to change permissions on drive C, becuase of normal user account rules set in Windows Group Policies, and thereby not able to run Photoshop at all as a user.

     

    Come on Adobe! Mercury cache this and tilable patterns that, make your software run first!

     
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    Jun 22, 2012 4:22 PM   in reply to sunstonecreations

    Hi, I have the "scratch file" problem also. It seems to only happen if I open pre-CS6 photoshop files that contain smart objects (so far).

     

    Example, open CS5 PSD file fine. Create a new doc (file>new). Drag smart object from first document to second, I get "Could not open a scratch file because the file is locked....".

    If I rasterize the smart object before moving, then I don't get the error.

     

    Another example is that if I open the CS5 PSD file and try and edit the smart object, it will go through to illustrator fine, I can edit the vector object, but when done and I get sent back to PS, I get the 'scratch file' error and the smart object is not updated. Resaving the PSD from PS CS6 does not fix issue.

     

    PS CS6 would crash on startup before I deleted preferences, ran as admin and changed cache drive.

     

    I have OS on C: (SSD)

    Userfolder on P: (WD 1TB)

    I have been previously using CS5 Master collection with no issues. Just did a straight uninstall and installed CS6 via cloud, applied all updates.

    As it stands, Bridge and Indesign will only run as Admin without crashing (which disables any ability to work and save to network server) and I get this error with PS.

     

    System specs:

    i7 2600K @ 4428Mhz | Asus p8z68 Deluxe | 16GB RAM | 2 x EVGA GTX580 SC SLI | X-Fi Ti | 5TB | 2 x DVD | 1 x BluRay | Silverstone Strider 1500W | SilverStone FT02B Fortress | Win7 64bit | ASUS VG236H 23" 3D LCD x 3 | Nvidia 3D Vision kit | Logitech G19 KB and G9 Mouse

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,523 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Jun 22, 2012 4:39 PM   in reply to dean.p

    dean.p wrote:

     

    I have OS on C: (SSD)

    Userfolder on P: (WD 1TB)

     

     

    I have no insight into what Adobe may have coded that would lead to problems in this arrangement, but you're not the first who has reported here a problem where relocating things off a small SSD has led to problems.  I know of at least two others who have said they can only run Photoshop successfully As Administrator after having done similar things that should just work.

     

    Not that this can be an easy workaround for you but an approach that works (I know because I use it myself) is to create a huge C: volume from multiple SSDs in RAID 0.  This also has the advantage of pushing the increased performance up even higher and wear-loading the individual disks less (though that's not really a practical problem any longer with modern SSDs).  Pointing parts of your system to a spinning hard drive does slow things down.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jun 28, 2012 4:27 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    This problem surfaced on my pc immediately upon starting Photoshop CS6 after installing Design Standard. In line with comments above, I then started it as administrator, and found the installation program had marked my boot drive (a relatively early [=small] SSD), as the only scratch drive, even though there also is a large drive with loads of free space. I changed the scratch disk to the latter drive, and the problem disappeared.

     

    I have two gripes with this:

    First, wouldn't it be simple for the installation program to check whether the intended scratch disk is fit for the purpose, and request the user's input about the choice of scratch disk, limiting the choices to those drives that meet Photoshop's requirements?

    Second, it would seem logical for Photoshop -- in case there is a problem with the scratch disk -- to proceed along the lines described above, instead of throwing an error message that does not even identify the problematic disk.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Jun 28, 2012 4:33 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    I agree, Photoshop's "scratch" strategy in general should be reassessed and potentially overhauled.

     

    But Adobe doesn't have a habit of revisiting core functionality.  They're milking the cash cow and a lot of stuff that's growing ever more outdated just remains the same from version to version.  Perhaps they figure millions of users have found a way to make it work, so that's good enough especially in light of the possibility of breaking things if they do sweep through with changes.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jun 28, 2012 11:24 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    So still no solution for this? so basically we are unable to open photoshop. excellent just waste of time and money. I should have taken the Corel or for simplier stuff free http://pixlr.com/editor/ although pixlr.com has very advanced stuff.

     
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    Jun 28, 2012 11:45 PM   in reply to mari8899

    Actually I just ran into this myself here on my new machine. It seems that several CS6 programs, including PS, do not properly communicate with Windows' UAC and thus does not trigger the proper dialogs the first time it is launched. This can be fixed by invoking the Ctrl+Alt+Shift command to trash the prefs and then just liek magic the UAC disk access dialog will appear. Once you have confirmed it, PS will run just fine. Go, figure!

     

    Mylenium

     
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    Jun 28, 2012 11:55 PM   in reply to Mylenium

    Just noticed that Illustrator also takes the startup disk as the scratch disk but does not cause the above problem...

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 12:07 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    ctrl+alt+shift did show one time, and I pressed NO, and now popup error is back again. I don't have time to explore that "scratch" thing, i'm no developer/programmer and i just want photoshop to work. if all those brainiacs at Adobe can't figure this out and repair before final product comes out then they should mention in they Advertisement, you buy it but it will contain a LOT of bugs, errors, issues, problems - in short don't use it, buy something else.

    I had issue with other CS6 programs, it seems that Adobe quality is going down with every new product.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 1:32 AM   in reply to mari8899

    mari8899 wrote:

     

    ctrl+alt+shift did show one time, and I pressed NO, and now popup error is back again…

     

     

    Well, why on Earth did you press "NO" ???    That's exactly the opposite of what you should have done!  You would have been in business by now.  Oy!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 29, 2012 1:34 AM   in reply to station_two

    I didn't want to erase all my settings, and thats what it said it will do.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 1:37 AM   in reply to mari8899

    But, but…  your settings files are CORRUPTED!  The whole idea is to erase them, trash them, nuke them.  A new, fresh, uncorrupted set of preferences files will be created.

     

    That is the whole point!  

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 1:39 AM   in reply to mari8899

    What is it with you folks who are reluctant to spend a couple of minutes re-setting your preferences?? !!  That's all it takes, for Pete's sake!

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 1:59 AM   in reply to station_two

    You're putting this on me like Adobe has nothing to do with this issue. I'm not developer nor do I want to be one to understand any of the problematics thats happening here, I just want program to work perfectly.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 2:05 AM   in reply to station_two

    (1) I don't see the need to shout.

    (2) Who are you generalizing your outcry to?

    (3) I dislike spending time on rectifying a coding error/oversight by the publisher that causes a program to crash at start-up after a fresh install (as with Photoshop's desire to create a scratch file at a forbidden location, and, as a result, crashing with a rather uninformative error message).

    (4) For the Windows version, on a computer with multiple partitions, starting the thing as administrator once, then changing the location of the scratch file should be sufficient to get rid of the scratch file crash. No need for resetting preferences. (And if there is a need, how can the preferences be corrupted after a fresh install?)

     

    Message was edited by: jerdenberg (forgot some parentheses)

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 2:07 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    Change location of the scratch file to what? where ? i have photoshop installed on C which is SSD.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 2:11 AM   in reply to mari8899

    The simple work-around is not possible if you have a single drive. [I have a data drive with a lot of space, so I put the scratch file there.]

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 2:14 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    I have 2 hdd plus SSD, but I still don't understand what to do and where exactly. And what will this scratch file do on my other drive ?

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 3:07 AM   in reply to mari8899

    mari8899 wrote:

     

    You're putting this on me like Adobe has nothing to do with this issue. I'm not developer nor do I want to be one to understand any of the problematics thats happening here, I just want program to work perfectly.

     

    Look, the program is not working properly on your computer because one or more of your preferences file got corrupted.  It's up to you to fix your computer.  Whether the corruption was caused by a hardware problem, by a crash or some other cause, Adobe is not responsible.

     

    Right now, your corrupted preferences file is directing Photoshop to use a a drive that doesn't exist (the name may be all garbled) or a phantom file that is locked.  Trashing your preferences will solve that, as the corrupted name will disappear and yourr boot drive will be designated as the new scratch disk drive.

     

    Imagine you buy a new car and a tire blows out.  The car manufacturer cannot fix that for you, you have to change the tire.  Period.

     

    An explanation of waht a scratch disk is will follow in one or two more post.  Everything should be clear then.

     

     

    Hang on…

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 3:08 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    The simple work-around is not possible if you have a single drive. [I have a data drive with a lot of space, so I put the scratch file there.]

     

    Yes it is,  See my previous post.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 3:16 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    (1) I don't see the need to shout.

     

     

    Don't be ridiculous.  I'm not typing everything in all caps, I am giving emphasis to words I consider to be emphasized.

     

     

     

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    …(2) Who are you generalizing your outcry to?…

     

    To every single poster who ever complains about not wanting to reset preferences for whatever reason.

     

     

     

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    …(3) I dislike spending time on rectifying a coding error/oversight by the publisher that causes a program to crash at start-up after a fresh install (as with Photoshop's desire to create a scratch file at a forbidden location, and, as a result, crashing with a rather uninformative error message)…

    Nonsense.  There's no coding error.  There's a file that got corrupted for whatever reason, such as neglectful routine maintenance of your computer, OS error, failing hardware, or software conflict with other appliactons, fonts, etc.

     

     

     

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    …(4) …how can the preferences be corrupted after a fresh install?)

     

    See above.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 3:38 AM   in reply to mari8899

    mari8899 wrote:

     

    I have 2 hdd plus SSD, but I still don't understand what to do and where exactly. And what will this scratch file do on my other drive ?

     

     

    OK, here comes the explanation of what the scratch disk does and why it's optimal to have it on a physically separate internal drive (not partition!) other than your boot drive:

     

    Photoshop creates a scratch disk the instant you open an image file or create a new document.  It's akin to virtual memory on a drive, and Photoshop moves things from RAM into the scratch disk and vice versa as necessary.

     

    Photoshop creates a scratch disk for every single document you open.  It bases its size on things like file size, number of history states, number of layers, etc.  The entire file must fit in it.  Figure on at least 50, 75 or 100 times the size of your largest file—or more—and multiply that by the number of open files.

     

    If the scratch disk is created on the same physical drive where your boot volume resides, Photoshop will be competing with the swap files of the OS for the use of the only set of read/write head(s), which will slow you down and increase the likelihood of file corruption.   Obviously, if you have only one drive, you are stuck with that arrangement so you have to live with it.  Tough!

     

    That's why partitioning the boot drive does NOT help, quite the contrary.  When partitioned, the above named files will still be competing for the use of a single read/write head or set of heads.  You gain nothing by partitioning, and you limit the contiguous, unfragmented space for Photoshop's scratch disk.  Bad ideas, both.

     

    On my desktop machine right now a keep a dedicated, physically separate 200 GB hard drive exclusively for Photoshop's primary scratch disk use.  On my laptop, I have attached a 160 GB external FireWire drive for that purpose.  Others have TB drives as dedicated scratch drives.

     

    Other applications, such as web browsers, will also keep their cache files and other invisible files on what to you appears to be empty space on your boot drive,

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 29, 2012 3:44 AM   in reply to station_two

    Although shouting is extremely obvious when presented in caps, I consider "for Pete's sake" and double exclamation/question marks as shouting too, but then I may be old-fashioned.

     

    The thing about resetting preferences is dubious at least. Of all the programs running on my pc, from MS office to VMWare Workstation, and from putty to filezilla, only the CS6 programs created the ridiculous problems that many are encountering.

     

    Your response to my item (3) is ridiculous (now I am shouting). The fact that Photoshop tries to create a scratch file in the root directory of the start-up disk, which has been off-limits for quite some time now, has nothing to do with errors on the pc, but only with (a) programmer(s) neglecting a general rule set by the operating system.

     

    BTW, My reference to the simple solution was to changing the scratch disk to another one than the start-up disk, which is rather impossible if one has only 1 disk.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 3:45 AM   in reply to mari8899

    There are other factors that can contribute to the scratch disk drive not being accessible, like permissions errors, improperly named volumes or directories (stick to the letters of the English alphabet, numbers and underscore.  Do not use commas, colons, semicolons, apostrophes, slashes, asterisks, diacriticals, special characters and things of that nature.

     

    Power spikes, lightning hitting the mains also can corrupt files.  So can an OS malfunction, an improperly written driver, a computer crash or hang.  None of that is controlled by Adobe.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 3:49 AM   in reply to station_two

    station_two wrote:

     

     

    Look, the program is not working properly on your computer because one or more of your preferences file got corrupted.  It's up to you to fix your computer.  Whether the corruption was caused by a hardware problem, by a crash or some other cause, Adobe is not responsible.

     

    Right now, your corrupted preferences file is directing Photoshop to use a a drive that doesn't exist (the name may be all garbled) or a phantom file that is locked.  Trashing your preferences will solve that, as the corrupted name will disappear and yourr boot drive will be designated as the new scratch disk drive.

     

    Imagine you buy a new car and a tire blows out.  The car manufacturer cannot fix that for you, you have to change the tire.  Period.

     

    An explanation of waht a scratch disk is will follow in one or two more post.  Everything should be clear then.

     

     

    Hang on…

     

    Google search says its thousands with the same issue and not just me. If you want to compare this with car industry then you would notice how when failure arises they ask for customers to return cars to fix them. Besides I never got that error from any other software in 20 years I'm working on computers, so when we rule out all of that, Adobe made Photoshop, Photoshop is producing this error. Error is NOT produced by the Windows or hardware mailfunction or any other software installed.

    The problem is IN Adobe Photoshop. Period.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 3:52 AM   in reply to mari8899

    To solve the problem with the scratch disk, I

    (1) Started Photoshop as administrator,

    (2) Went to preferences and changed the scratch disk to a non-start-up disk

    (3) Closed Photoshop

    After that, I could start it normally from my regular account.

    Hope this helps.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 4:14 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    …BTW, My reference to the simple solution was to changing the scratch disk to another one than the start-up disk, which is rather impossible if one has only 1 disk.

     

     

    Oh, for crying out loud!  (so WHAT if I'm shouting now?)  Trashing your preferences file will at least force the creation of a new one and. if there's any eligible space on your drive, it will set that space as the scratch file.  If you're using illegal characters in anything along the path, then you're SOL (Severely Out of Luck).

     

    Look, yes, I'm frustrated with you now.    I'm trying to help you solve YOUR problem and all you want to do is argue, and rant.  My computers, both Macs and Windows boxes are scrupulously maintained and they run FLAWLESSLY., and I don't mind shouting it to the world.  Don't give me this "old fashioned excuse," I'm an old geezer with grandchildren, one of them in college by now.

     

    No one has any obligation to respond to any post in these user to user forums, where we are all volunteering our time, expertise and experience for free.  Even those members of Adobe staff who contribute here do so as volunteers, on their own time and dime.

     

    If you don't like the advice I'm giving you for free, you're entitled to your money back:  $0.00.

     

    Message was edited by: station_two

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 4:01 AM   in reply to mari8899

    mari8899 wrote:

     

    The problem is IN Adobe Photoshop. Period.

     

    Fine.  I'm not here to argue with you.  I was trying to help you.  I'm not the one with the problem, you are.  Your computer is, not any of mine.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 4:03 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    To solve the problem with the scratch disk, I

    (1) Started Photoshop as administrator,

    (2) Went to preferences and changed the scratch disk to a non-start-up disk

    (3) Closed Photoshop

    After that, I could start it normally from my regular account.

    Hope this helps.

     

     

    Well, good for you, jerdenberg!

     

    What does that tell you?  The issue was in YOUR setup.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Jun 29, 2012 4:05 AM   in reply to station_two

    station_two wrote:

     

    OK, here comes the explanation of what the scratch disk does and why it's optimal to have it on a physically separate internal drive (not partition!) other than your boot drive

     

    I probably shouldn't say anything since it could complicate this thread, but the rules of thumb can be different under special circumstances when SSD is involved.

     

    IF you have a LOT of empty space on your SSD-based system drive, then Photoshop can actually work great with it's scratch setting pointed at the system drive.  This is because a) SSD transfers are much faster than spinning hard drives and b) there's no seek time, so simultaneous transfers to/from scratch and swap files aren't devastating to performance, and you can see a net gain because of the increased I/O throughput over what's possible using a separate spinning drive for scratch.

     

    But if you don't have a huge amount of free space (hundreds of GB) on the system SSD, it's definitely better to use a separate drive, as station_two has said.

     

    Also, up to about a year or so ago, you had to try to severely limit write activity to your SSD drive, since you could actually wear them out by repeated high data write activity.  That's pretty much a non-issue now with the advent of things like the SandForce in-drive controller that does wear-leveling inside the drive.  Modern drives will last 10 years or more in normal typical use, without special consideration.

     

    As it turns out, making a RAID array of SSDs is a great way to boost performance across the board, have bunches of free space, and ensure even the heaviest usage doesn't shorten the drive life.  I have done so, creating a 2 TB system drive C: made from 4 SSDs and Photoshop's swap file (and pretty much everything else) pointed to C:.  This system flies, and I can barely tell when Photoshop and/or Windows "goes virtual" and starts using its scratch/swap files heavily.  I don't even notice Photoshop auto-saves.

     

    Sorry for the SSD diversion.

     

    Back on topic

     

    Pretty much everyone who's successfully using a computer - Mac and PC users alike - comes to realize after a while that the task of integrating things on their computers and making everything work falls on THEM, not the developers of applications like Adobe.  Some applications pose unique challenges, but to think you can just throw up your hands and try to make it someone else's problem when something goes wrong simply isn't a viable strategy.  Maybe that's how things should be, but it's not how it is.

     

    For those of you struggling to get Photoshop to run properly, bear in mind that it's on you to get things working.  It works for most folks.  It could be a configuration or setup choice you've made that may need revisiting, or some kind of restorative activity that you need to do, or even something very minor like clearing your Photoshop preferences, but it may well take your learning new things and doing things you didn't think you'd have to do to get back to where you can edit photos.  It's no one's problem but your own.

     

    So let us here on the forum help you - when we say to do something, try it.  We're not here to jerk you around; we're users just like you who have already found the ways to make things work, and we'd like to help you do the same.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 4:07 AM   in reply to mari8899

    mari8899 wrote:

     

    … If you want to compare this with car industry then you would notice how when failure arises they ask for customers to return cars to fix them…

     

     

    For a flat tire?   LOL ! 

     

    What you have is a malfunction in YOUR setup that is preventing Photoshop from running.

     

    If your car is being blocked by your kid's tricycle on your driveway, you would probably blame it on Ford too.  Right. 

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 4:12 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Thanks for chiming in, Noel!  The sun is rising (or did rise) in Florida while it's still night time here in the West Coast.  You're getting up already and I'm just going to bed.

     

    See you later, once I catch some sleep.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 5:15 AM   in reply to station_two

    station_two wrote:

     

    Well, good for you, jerdenberg!

     

    What does that tell you?  The issue was in YOUR setup.

     

    After a good night's sleep, you might take the time to think about this.

     

    My setup, which is the standard setup of any fresh Windows 7 install, prohibits non-administrator accounts writing to the root directory of the boot drive. This policy was implemented by Microsoft at a point in time several years ago.

    Now the installer of Design Standard CS6 chooses to assign to this directory the scratch disk of a program (Photoshop) that should not be run with administrator rights by default, with the scratch disk crash as a result. This is at variance with the policy mentioned above, and for no good reason.

     

    Nevertheless, you maintain the issue is in my setup. That is comparable to a person who goes to a restaurant, takes a seat at a table that is labeled as being reserved for another party, then breaks down when he is told this is forbidden.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 5:19 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    Pretty much everyone who's successfully using a computer - Mac and PC users alike - comes to realize after a while that the task of integrating things on their computers and making everything work falls on THEM, not the developers of applications like Adobe.  Some applications pose unique challenges, but to think you can just throw up your hands and try to make it someone else's problem when something goes wrong simply isn't a viable strategy.  Maybe that's how things should be, but it's not how it is.

     

    For those of you struggling to get Photoshop to run properly, bear in mind that it's on you to get things working.  It works for most folks.  It could be a configuration or setup choice you've made that may need revisiting, or some kind of restorative activity that you need to do, or even something very minor like clearing your Photoshop preferences, but it may well take your learning new things and doing things you didn't think you'd have to do to get back to where you can edit photos.  It's no one's problem but your own.

     

     

    I find this somewhat irreconcilable with what you wrote in message 6 above...

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 5:30 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    Frankly, jerdenberg, at this point I don't give a darn about what you think or have to say.

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 6:32 AM   in reply to station_two

    No problem. Have a good time in your ivory tower.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Jun 29, 2012 8:27 AM   in reply to jerdenberg

    jerdenberg wrote:

     

    I find this somewhat irreconcilable with what you wrote in message 6 above...

     

    There's no conflict here.

     

    As I said, Adobe could do a better job of installing their software and setting up permissions for properly accessing your hard drive for temporary purposes.  That's true.

     

    But it's been the way it is for years, and the masses continue sending Adobe money.  It works for most people.  Ergo, they're not going to make it work better just for you.  That's not an apology, that's not letting them off the hook, it's just a recognition of what's real.

     

    It CAN work.  Thus the only workable solution is that YOU have to take whatever steps you can to make it work - or return it for refund.  The former could include setting permissions, rebuilding your computer with more standard settings, or even getting a new one.

     

    This is the reality that we all have to deal with when we get mass-market software for just a few hundred bucks that cost literally millions of dollars to develop. 

     

    You've done something wrong in setting up your particular computer or messed something up after the fact that has caused Photoshop not to work for you.  A number of folks, for example, have tried to "trick" their systems into using a too-cheap SSD, for example, by relocating a bunch of stuff to other drives.  They think they can get away with doing this with no downside.  Guess what, there are downsides.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Jun 29, 2012 11:29 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Very well said, Noel.

     

    What I fail to understand is why these users come to the Adobe user to user forums with a problem, then refuse to listen to those who are trying to help them.

     
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