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Importing photos into Lightroom: Basic workflow

Jun 22, 2012 10:05 PM

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2012 10:05 PM   in reply to Community Help

    Way, way too complicated to use for the normal person!  Extremely disappointing  software!  Instead of simplifying things, Adobe sat there and thought, 'What can we do to make things nearly impossible to even begin to edit photos?' Absolute asininity!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 22, 2012 10:49 PM   in reply to Nikonal58

    What is complicated?? Lightroom is designed for photographers after all.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 23, 2012 12:02 AM   in reply to Nikonal58

    You disregard that Lightroom is also a Digital Asset Management (DAM).

     

    It does a remarkable well job here, which room for improvement which is much smaller than in other areas.

     

    If you do not need a DAM, I suggest you use Photoshop (maybe in lean Elements version) instead and use their ACR tool to get exactly the same Raw rendering as in Lightroom.

    In that case LR is unnecessary overkill for you.

     

    Should you have to answer how you will find selected photos among half a million images some time from now (professional photographers need this most often within the first five years, private ones for family heritage even in 30 years for the next generation) you may find LR's administration very welcome !

    Going for standard formats such as DNG, thorough keywording and filling of titles and captions, saving them back to the xmp-part of the file, will achieve a long way to sustainability, even in changing technical specifications.

    LR catalog is not "unreasonable" either for that, as a SQLite database.

     

    Cornelia

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 23, 2012 5:19 AM   in reply to Nikonal58

    Instead of simplifying things, Adobe sat there and thought, 'What can we do to make things nearly impossible to even begin to edit photos?' Absolute asininity!

    Baloney. Adobe designed a tool for photographers. You (and any Lightroom user) need to spend some time to learn the software, and you will find it does a fantastic job for cataloging and editing (and a bunch of other things). But if you don't spend the time to learn it and work with it, you will never see the benefit, or the brilliance behind it.

     

    If you want software that you can pick up and use immediately, without spending the time to learn it, may I suggest ... well ... I don't have any suggestions in this category.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 28, 2012 5:36 PM   in reply to dj_paige

    I recently upgraded from LR3 to LR4 and then had to completely reinstall my OS, losing track of my Catalogs (which I admittedly did not have an adequate handle on).  That said, I went to import images into LR4 and they are "greyed over," meaning that I can't select them for import.  It is apparent to me that I imported them in the past, because of my naming system (1234-Shoot Name) but I am unable to do anything with them.  Even when I go after them in a new folder, where the original files (DSC_1234) were copied AFTER the new OS installation, those too are greyed over.  Any suggestions?  Thanks!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 28, 2012 5:37 PM   in reply to iagodog

    I recently upgraded from LR3 to LR4 and then had to completely reinstall my OS, losing track of my Catalogs (which I admittedly did not have an adequate handle on).  That said, I went to import images into LR4 and they are "greyed over," meaning that I can't select them for import.  It is apparent to me that I imported them in the past, because of my naming system (1234-Shoot Name) but I am unable to do anything with them.  Even when I go after them in a new folder, where the original files (DSC_1234) were copied AFTER the new OS installation, those too are greyed over.  Any suggestions?  Thanks!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 29, 2012 11:02 AM   in reply to Community Help

    I still haven't figured out how to quickly select and/or deselect large number of photos with shortcut keys. Such as using the shift key with a click (on my Mac) to pick first and last pics and includes everything in between. It laborious to click every single image, when you got hundreds to import.  Can anyone tell me how to do it faster?

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 29, 2012 11:29 AM   in reply to cohagberg

    I still haven't figured out how to quickly select and/or deselect large number of photos with shortcut keys. Such as using the shift key with a click (on my Mac) to pick first and last pics and includes everything in between. It laborious to click every single image, when you got hundreds to import.  Can anyone tell me how to do it faster?

     

    I figured out one option using the shift key. Seems a little redundant to first select the ones you want and then do it again with the check box. Maybe I'm messing up. I still like to know selection shortcuts.

     

     

     

     
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  • Victoria Bampton
    5,302 posts
    Apr 1, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 29, 2012 1:12 PM   in reply to cohagberg

    Besides clicking the Select All button?  Cmd-A and then the ` key will toggle the checkmarks on the selected photos.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 29, 2012 5:13 PM   in reply to iagodog

    iagodog wrote:

     

    ...I went to import images into LR4 and they are "greyed over," meaning that I can't select them for import....

     

    That's LR's way of telling you that the particular images in question are already imported.  If you want to force it to re-import them anyway, uncheck the "Don't Import Suspected Duplicates" option at the top of the right-hand column.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2012 5:58 PM   in reply to Nikonal58

    The 'Adobe Help' via AdobeTV is not helpful. Presenter assumes viewer has significant computer literacy. Not helpful at all to those of us with average computer skills.  For example, when computer/software terms are not defined, we become lost. Presenter is not an educator, just fires off her knowledge without regard to viewer's lack of knowlede on Lightroom.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 20, 2012 6:04 PM   in reply to dj_paige

    The photographer's value is being in the field making images. Sitting in front of a computer learning software and 'managing' images in a complex software is not helpful nor benficial to the photographer. Lightroom is not sensitive to the average computer skilled photographer, more simplified managing software is needed.

     
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  • Victoria Bampton
    5,302 posts
    Apr 1, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 21, 2012 1:14 AM   in reply to StillPreferVelvia

    StillPreferVelvia wrote:

    Lightroom is not sensitive to the average computer skilled photographer, more simplified managing software is needed.

     

    Then perhaps Lightroom isn't the program for you.  You could go back to film, if you prefer, or there are companies who can look after the editing for you, just like labs did in the film days.  Alternatively, if you'd like some help to learn, there are some excellent resources and we'll be pleased to help.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 21, 2012 1:32 AM   in reply to StillPreferVelvia

    StillPreferVelvia,

     

    This is a user to user forum where I and others get a lot of helpful information from.

     

    So what is your post about?  Do you have a question about the LR workflow? There are numerous tutorials on the web.

     

    Just a complaint about the software? OK, you don't like it. So what? Don't get me wrong, I respect you opinion.

    I don't like Lotus Notes but I have to use it at work. Why posting complaints in a Notes user forum? I have to get along with the software. You don't have to use LR, I bet. Buy a software that better suits your needs...

     

    I started with LR 2, bought a book, read a couple of tutorials, asked questions in forums. This is how I learned to work with LR. It's a very powerful tool for DAM and moreover an excellent RAW converter and one of my favorite software tools. It helps me handle and work on my tons of images. It's not perfect but which one is?

     

    Oli

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 5, 2012 5:06 PM   in reply to Community Help

    "To have Lightroom start automatically when you plug in a camera or card reader, choose Lightroom > Preferences (Mac OS) or Edit > Preferences (Windows). In General, look under Import Options and select Show Import Dialog When A Memory Card Is Detected."

     

    I have LR4.2 installed on a Windows 7 PC and LR4 definitely does not start automatically when the camera (d5100) is plugged in. For the d5100, Windows Autoplay has two options 1. Open device stage. 2. Take no action. If I select Option 1, the Open Device Manager starts and runs whatever program has been selected by the user as the default. The program list does not include LR4. It does have Elements 11 as an option.  I also have that installed on the PC. I have not found any way, to date, to add a program to the Open Device Manager list.

     

    Autoplay's second option for the D5100 is what I've selected. As a result, no program auto-runs when the camera is connected. I manually run LR4 and proceed to import the images.

     

    As a further comment, Autoplay does recognize that LR4 is on the computer and offers that as an option to import pictures or mixed content. I have made that selection, to no avail.

     

    Anyone run across this issue?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 6, 2012 12:08 AM   in reply to Norwester1

    Yep. The original quote was slightly misleading....that "auto launch" setting in the Lightroom preferences does not apply to direct camera attachment (on Win7). I don't know why, but that's the way it is. It MAY be possible to start hacking around in the OS to get that to happen, but by default it won't.

     

    I use a card reader, and for that the option works correctly.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 9, 2012 9:01 AM   in reply to Community Help

    how do I upgrade from lt.4.2 to 4.3  I cannot import raw files from my new conon g15

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 9, 2012 9:06 AM   in reply to tony hick 1

    There is no upgrade as such, but there is a RC at Adobe Labs. http://labs.adobe.com/technologies/lightroom4-3/?tabID=details#tabTop

     

    N.B. The Release Candidate has a built in expiry, though usually after the Full Release.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2012 1:00 PM   in reply to StillPreferVelvia

    @ StillPreferVelvia: "The 'Adobe Help' via AdobeTV is not helpful. Presenter assumes viewer has significant computer literacy. Not helpful at all to those of us with average computer skills."

    @Nikonal58 : "Way, way too complicated to use for the normal person!  Extremely disappointing  software!  Instead of simplifying things, Adobe sat there and thought, 'What can we do to make things nearly impossible to even begin to edit photos?' Absolute asininity!"

     

    Sorry if I sound blunt, but I'd say all of Adobe's programs aimed for non-aficionado require some knowledge -or some study- of both the software and the computer. Photoshop is also a program that requires plenty of study in order to get full benefit of it, but the fact is many people who "use it", use it for things they could do elsewhere.

    I can understand not everyone has the time or energy to study, but keeping up to date with one's equipment is part of what being a professional or an amateur who takes his/her hobby seriously is. It's like buying a SLR or DSLR camera and complaining it's too complicated to master and that you don't want to spend time to know it, you just want to shoot. It's a reasonable goal, but if that's your MO the maybe a point and shoot is a better choice for you.

    Same happens here. If you're just inetrested in developing your pics, there are many other programs (inlcuding some form Adobe) that will do the trick too, but LR fulfills the need to track your pictures, and that means the first thing you face is the database section (the mere notion of working witha database for some reason seems to scare many people). Even so, LR is fairly intuitive, especially in the other modules.

    I would encourage you to give the manual a read and play a bit with LR, it is a very powerful program. But if all you want is developing (and considering for most pixel alteration you will probably go thourgh Photoshop anyway), have you considered checking if your camera brand provides a free software that might suit you better?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2012 2:03 PM   in reply to Community Help

    Hi Folks.

     

    I'm not an expert, but I am a professional photographer and I have been using Lightroom since it first came out in beta so I have watched it grow and change significantly.  I agree that it is not a program for casual users, and there are other programs available that can reach the same objective without some of the complications of using Lightroom.  It is still a great program for photographic workflow for those of us who "work" in the photographic field day in and day out, and for those who wish to handle larger volumes of images in batches, etc.

     

    On the subject of importing, I have to weigh in with one of my pet peeves.  This goes for iPhoto as well as Lightroom.  The whole process of having to "import" images into catalogues, libraries, albums and the like is a royal pain.  It is a complicated process with many variables, even for pros, and one which I would like to see eliminated from Lightroom in the future.  I will compare this experience with a couple of other programs, which I will not name at present, where it is very easy to view the folders and subfolders where image files reside simple by clicking on them in a sidebar menu.  They accomodate tethered shooting.  There is no requirement to import files before viewing.  Images can be adjusted, cropped, exported - all from the program without having to import them to a library.  Changes are saved and embedded to the data of the raw files for future use.  It is simpler than Lightroom in that way.  Admittedly, there are not as many image editing capabilities  with the other programs as there are in Lighroom.  Let's just say, "It would sure be nice if...we could have the best of both worlds."  Neither Adobe nor Apple have provided decent explanations for why importing is necessary.

     

    I'm all ears!

     

    RB

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2012 2:38 PM   in reply to rbphotog

    rbphotog wrote:

     

      Neither Adobe nor Apple have provided decent explanations for why importing is necessary.

     

    I'm all ears!

     

    RB

    Lightroom is no file browser program, but a database (SQLite), which contains records about your images.

    Therefore you have to tell LR for which images it should create records = importing.

     

    A record contains a pointer to the actual file location, all your metadata and develop instructions. It is non-destructive, because it does not do anything to the files it references.

    Only if you want to populate xmp of your images with the content of LR's record (as far as there is space foreseen inside xmp format), you can tell LR to do so: either by catalog setting to do so continuously in the background, or by your explicit triggering it via Ctrl S (Cmd S on mac).

    Exporting from LR means that you instruct it to write entirely new files.

     

    Cornelia

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2012 3:14 PM   in reply to rbphotog

    Hi RB, Cornelia already provided a valuable answer, so forgive me if I add my two cents.

     

    One of the main points of Lightroom is that it helps you keep track of your images. You can keep your images anywhere you want, and you can view the catalogue prieviews even if the storage point is not connected.

    This is extremely useful, especially if you have a big number of images. Imagine you don't remember where they are, LR will tell you through the catalogue (because it's a database) as it will indicate the place where they were originally stored. Should you move them around outside LR, it will indicate they have been misplaced and offer an easy way to look for them and an even easier way to update the new location.

    Another use of the database and catalogue is that you can carry it around in a portable drive to display elswhere while keeping you files safely at home (although you would not be able to perform some of the tasks, being able to show your catalogue might be useful).

     

    Importing is necessary because one of LR's main goals was to serve as an archive for the pictures.

    I am not sure why so many people have an issue with importing the files, it's not such a long process and it provides benefits even if you're not organized by nature (as you can at least know where to start looking for your pics). It allows you to access files on many criteria and very fast (that's one of the main goals of any database) even if you haven't bothered adding keywords.

    The importation process is quite straightforward once you decide your workflow and your usual settings, it's mainly clicking andthat's it. You're not even forced to move your pictures or copy them to another physical location, so no need to worry with that if you don't want to; you can simply import them by adding them to the catalogue.

     

    I have the feeling besides the concept of database, one of the thing that makes people weary is thinking about the different names/ways in which you can organize your stuff: Libraries, collections etc... The point is, the level of complexity is entirely up to you!

    If you're not in the mood to get messed up with collections etc, there's no need to use them. They are handy, but it will depend on your workflow.

    One of the beauties of LR is that its felxibility adapts to many workflows, but that dosen't mean you have to adopt all of what the program offers into yours (just like most people don't use all the rating/flag/color marking choices).

    If you prefer not to do anything, then just add the pics to the catalogue (and keep 1 catalogue for all your pics) and no need even to add keywords.

     

    This may sound elitist, but even in the help manual Lightroom is presented as a program for professional photographers. Before LR and the like came along, professionals had to keep physical archives or use other software to do the trick (like Portofolio). Archiving and being able to relocate images efficiently IS BASIC PART of what being a pro photographer is. Maybe in teh future LR will change, but right now it is designed keeping the needs of pros in mind.

    Still if you want "the best of both worlds" you can actually click the add to catalogue without looking into anything else and forget about collections etc... The program allows you to work that way too, but you will be missing some of its most valuable functions.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 29, 2012 7:48 PM   in reply to Monaggio

    Indeed, importing was invented to *solve* problems (not create them). Yes, it creates a little hurdle to people accustomed to:

     

    * open file

    * edit file

    * save file

     

    thinking.

     

    And, truth betold, the purpose for importing is much more obvious when your photos start life on a card. When you already have your photos in folders, named the way you want, metadata applied... - it can seem more "pointless".

     

    Put another way, the purpose for importing is to:

     

    * copy files from card to hard disk.

    * incorporate in library in folder-structure which matches user-defined convention.

    * ditto for filenames (and file format, if you're a DNG'r).

    * create 2nd backup copy

    * and some people like the convenience of assigning metadata preset & develop presets & keywords during import

    etc... (just open the import dialog box for a more thorough answer).

     

    That said, I do think it would be a nice touch if Lightroom, when it detects "first run", asked user if he/she has an already setup folder structure to be added, so users don't start out with no photos, and no clue...

     

    Summary: I *do* think Adobe could help the poor beastherds just getting started, by including a tutorial and a checkbox:

     

    "yes, I do solemnly swear that I thoroughly understand the notion of catalog/import, non-destructive editing/xmp, in-camera preview vs. Adobe-rendered raw..."

     

    Until you check that box, you have no choice but to watch the tuturial - sorry: but it's a pre-requisite for successfully using Lightroom. (dj_paige agrees with me, no joke...).

     

    Bottom line: importing is your friend - get to know her.

     

    PS - Importing is a "requirement", because that's as far as they got when writing Lightroom. i.e. although importing is necessary for Lightroom, it's also possible to have a "browse"/auto-import mode, it just wasn't implemented, no doubt (at least in part) because all bases are pretty-much covered already by present import feature. Still: it's a feature request which has garnered substantial user support on the Adobe feedback site.

     

    UPDATE: I just realized if catalog is empty then Lr's loupe view will be "Click the "Import..." button to begin. - which is great, still: a tutorial would be even greater, since the Import Dialog box can be pretty daunting to the un-initiated.

     

    Cheers,

    Rob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 30, 2012 5:44 AM   in reply to Rob Cole

    Rob Cole wrote:

     

     

    Summary: I *do* think Adobe could help the poor beastherds just getting started, by including a tutorial and a checkbox:

     

    "yes, I do solemnly swear that I thoroughly understand the notion of catalog/import, non-destructive editing/xmp, in-camera preview vs. Adobe-rendered raw..."

     

    Until you check that box, you have no choice but to watch the tuturial - sorry: but it's a pre-requisite for successfully using Lightroom. (dj_paige agrees with me, no joke...).

     

    Bottom line: importing is your friend - get to know her.

    You're right and probably a tutorial would probably help many users. Maybe it could be suggested as a feature request.

    I also understand the Import Dialogue might be a bit intimidating on the first run, but not so much if you take the time to read the manual or give the program a go (or reading the explanations included in the interface). Besides of my own stuff I work on regular basis for 3 photographers/studios and I can tell you most software for pros work in a very similar way to LR (Aperture and ACDSee for example) or you've been thoruigh an archival program (or have an archival system of your own).

    I really don't think the difficulty is so much bigger than what PC users experience when switching to Mac, it's a matter of invetsing a little time in getting to know your equipment.

     

    Especially in LR4 I would have said the process is slightly less complicated than in past versions.

     

    I don't fully agree on what you see as the purposes of importing, as most of those features are optional (so not really a main purpose of the import process). If you don't want to bother with them, you don't (although bothering can be VERY effcient).

     

    I think the main purpose of the import is to let LR know what pics you're working with and where they are stored. The rest (making copies, changing locations or formats, adding metadata or settings, backing up etc...) is completely optional. And with the "add" importing option it doesn't matter that establish your file order/hierarchy outside LR as it does not affect it in any way (the images are only incorporated to the catalogue, which is you're just creating pointers or "thumbnails" of those files in LR so that you can access them when needed; the folders remain untouched).

    It's not so different a concept form the "recently opened" function in PS, but the catalogue keeps that access permanently unless you remove the the image form the catalogue ((while in PS it keeps a refreshed, limited pointers to the recent files).

     

    To make the Import concept easier to grasp, you can work AS IF the only "difference" from "opening file" in PS for example, was that once you have "opened" your file to LR once, it is always available in the collection without you having to "reopen it" through the program again. I know import is not the same as opening a file elswhere (that's why I'm putting "open" in itallic) , but if you look at both processes as ways of letting your program know what files you want it to aknowledge/work with, it's not so different. If you don't want to take advantage of the database feature you don't have to (although thedatabase will be there for you); if you work with very few files, then you can just select those files you want to "open" in the Import window, just as you would select which files to open through the PS Open command.

     

    I'm not too sure why would one invest in LR if you don't want to take advantage of some of its main features; there are plenty softwares that allow  great retouch, and especially if you're working with small volume of images, you can always switch to diferent applications in order to print or create slideshows/printing layouts etc...

    But what allows you to work non destructively in a more efficient way than Photoshop, (and more so if you're dealing with several images) is that for many tasks LR is working with the catalogue, and only really applies the changes to the file on export.

     

    I really think part of the problem is that people get flustered by a differnet interface and because they don't realize you can actually see "import" (especially in the "add" option) as not that different to "open file".

    I understand it might be harder to get used to the concept of non-destructive editing, and even more so that "exporting" is necessary in order for the changes to be "seen" in other applications/devices, but how else could you safely keep things non-destructive otherwise without using huge ammount of resources or creating gigantic files?

     

    I've actually adviced some of the photographers I've worked for not to use LR and to go for other applications instead. It all depends on your goals, requirements and workflow, and not because a product is popular or cool means it will work for you. It's like buying a Hasselblad simply because "it's the best", even if all you want is to post your pics online and half the time you work on automatic. Other more simple cameras will do the trick and give you less of a headache.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 12, 2012 3:35 PM   in reply to Nikonal58

    I agree. The design of the Adobe products is maximum complexity designed to provide authors who have been deeply trained by Adobe the opportunity to publish books that are way too difficult to read. an example of useless complexity is the video regarding work flow. The narrator is speaking at a rapid clip, clicking various items on the page and expecting a person who needs instruction to follow along. Impossible to follow is the appropriate phrase.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 12, 2012 6:59 PM   in reply to nikon4555

    lrose57 wrote:

     

    I agree. The design of the Adobe products is maximum complexity designed to provide authors who have been deeply trained by Adobe the opportunity to publish books that are way too difficult to read. an example of useless complexity is the video regarding work flow. The narrator is speaking at a rapid clip, clicking various items on the page and expecting a person who needs instruction to follow along. Impossible to follow is the appropriate phrase.

    Try this one: http://tv.adobe.com/watch/george-jardine-on-lightroom/the-lightroom-ca talog/

     

    It displays an earlier LR version so the screen dialogs look different; but the concepts still stand - and are intelligently and clearly laid out IMO.

     

    The biggest block to grasping LR, is when people have Photoshop habits that are so firmly established, that it seems to them: this is how things have to work. This takes some explanation, time and reflection to resolve: to accept that the same tasks can  also be tackled another way, which comes with different advantages. This is too fundamental to be fully self-evident in five minutes, especially if some strong concepts need to first be broken down and moved out of the way.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 12, 2012 8:30 PM   in reply to richardplondon

    Thank you. I bought the program because I was told it had good noise removal. But, the program makes catalogues and I do not want all my photos jumbled up into one huge pile that gave to be sorted every time I want to view an image.  I have photos from 2012 in a 2012 file, then have each folder with a 2012 prefix.

     

    I also want to view metadata, but that tab does not operate on my version. I will use Photo mechanic  because that program displays metadata, and I think knowing metadata information is helpful. I don't understand why Adobe would produce a program with a metadata tab, then not make it operable. I did not pay much for Lightroom, but I am disappointed the program is promoted with particular features that are in reality not available. For example, I opened a photo as a test to view metadata and that is when I learned metadata is not displayed.    Thanks.,

     

    Larry, sent from my AT&T iPad

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 1:56 AM   in reply to nikon4555

    lrose57 wrote:

     

    Thank you. I bought the program because I was told it had good noise removal. But, the program makes catalogues and I do not want all my photos jumbled up into one huge pile that gave to be sorted every time I want to view an image.  I have photos from 2012 in a 2012 file, then have each folder with a 2012 prefix.

    LR remembers how you last viewed the images, you should not need to re-browse each time. You can use the folders in exactly the same way as with other methods - because the folders ARE the same as in other methods. If you are seeing more images than you want to, you can disable the option to display images in subfolders of the currently selected folder, and instead, show only the images that are immediately inside that. Taking control is just a question of knowing how, which is a question of finding out and learning. But your options are then much wider, also more flexible and selective, than with a conventional image file browser - once you COMBINE different kinds of folder-based and non-folder-based (collection) views, with different filters and sorting options.

     

    I also use a date based arrangement - but don't see a need to repeat the 2012 in the folder name, as well as having a "year" folder in the path. I can click on or search on "2012" and get this same information by other means. I get LR to automatically file my images in a YYYY/MM/DD structure of folders and then I leave them be. So I haven't manually made or named any folder (for this purpose) - or had to supervise the physical import of my pictures from camera card into the computer - or had any reason to ever intervene or fiddle with these folders subsequently - for several years, thanks to an import preset  which I know I can rely on. That is a huge saving in time, attention, tedium... a solved problem.

     

    Hands-free is pain-free and error-free - you just have to adopt a system which works with the software rather than against the software. My own (previously Photoshop managed) image library was already in a date structure, so there was very little adjustment needed at the start.

     

    I am basically saying: the Catalog has for me proved a simplification, not a complication, of what I was previously doing.

     

     

    I also want to view metadata, but that tab does not operate on my version. I will use Photo mechanic  because that program displays metadata, and I think knowing metadata information is helpful. I don't understand why Adobe would produce a program with a metadata tab, then not make it operable. I did not pay much for Lightroom, but I am disappointed the program is promoted with particular features that are in reality not available. For example, I opened a photo as a test to view metadata and that is when I learned metadata is not displayed.

    In what way does the metadata "tab" not operate? When you say "metadata is not displayed", it is true that some very camera-specific settings such as the active focus point or particular camera image settings are not interpreted and presented by LR. This is simply how it works, remembering that where a camera manufacturer (say Nikon) can provide specific proprietary support in their own software for a small number of models with the benefit of full insider information, Adobe is reverse-engineering a large number of models from many manufacturers and presenting these in a brand-neutral way.

     

    The compensating benefit of that brand-neutrality is: if you have (say) a Nikon DSLR and a Canon compact, or change camera brand at a particular moment, you retain continuity - you don't have to separately use Nikon software on the pictures from one and Canon software on the pictures from the other. I even deliberately use Adobe Standard colour profile across the board, so that the pictures from different cameras can be processed, and respond to the same editing presets, very similarly.

     

    However your blanket statement suggests NO metadata is being displayed for you at all; which is a different issue and one I have never experienced, except when importing image versions which have been somehow stripped of their metadata by some other program first. Images straight out of the camera display many useful things in the LR environment, by which the images can immediately be selected and managed.

     

    Let's be pragmatic, and keep a sense of proportion here - LR's support of various cameras is as good as it needs to be for most practical purposes, for most people - or else nobody would use it.

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 3:23 AM   in reply to nikon4555

    I also want to view metadata, but that tab does not operate on my version. I will use Photo mechanic  because that program displays metadata, and I think knowing metadata information is helpful. I don't understand why Adobe would produce a program with a metadata tab, then not make it operable. I did not pay much for Lightroom, but I am disappointed the program is promoted with particular features that are in reality not available. For example, I opened a photo as a test to view metadata and that is when I learned metadata is not displayed.    Thanks.,

     

    Larry, sent from my AT&T iPad

    Hi Larry, that the metadata tab is not operable is very unusual. Have you tried contacting technical support or a forum member who might look further into the matter? It's hard to tell waht might be going on without more info or a screen shot, but as it's already been pointed out, it is only in some cases that metadata is not avaialble (and even then in my experience the tab is functional, the only thing that happens is that the fields are empty but even so you can still add your own metadata manually).

    Have you noticed some icon in the picture rpeviews (a "!" for example)? This happens when there is conflict between metadata (that for example metadata has been changed in another program after being registered by LR so it must be updated for it to be consistent).

     

    As for the catalogue issue, I guess it might depend on your workflow, but I don't see why the use of a catalogue should "bundle up" your pics in any way. The catalogue does nothing to your physical pictures nor to their order except aknowledging they exist and giving you a quick way to find them.

    If your metadata worked, a quick way of findng specific pictures (of one specific year for example) would be filtering them by the metadata or by using a keyword. Most Adobe Evangelists suggest using one catalogue for all pictures except on specific occasions (for example if you want to keep different clients or your personal and work pics in different catalogue sto avoid people seeing what they shouldn't if you open the catalogue infront of them), but I've worked with some pros that used one catalogue for each of their original picture folders, so what they see is exactly the "bundle" in that folder and nothing else.

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 9:44 PM   in reply to richardplondon

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Regarding metadata, if I have a photo selected, and try to select the word metadata in the tool bar, nothing happens. The words are there, but they are inoperable.

     

    Larry, sent from my AT&T iPad

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 10:07 PM   in reply to nikon4555

    User error: you invoke the filter when you click there, but then you do not specify anything, so of course nothing happens.

     

    The metadata panel is in library module on the right-hand side, 5th section from top.

    If you do not see it, make sure the panel is visible (view menu or F8) and scroll until you see it. You might still have unticked the section, check with right-click of your mouse and tick it. In solo-mode only one section atba time will be open, to spare you scrolling, very handy on a laptop screen.

     

    I would suggest that you spend quite some time learning LR. 4 hours should be enough.

    If you do not only want videos, but something to read, I highly recommend Victoria Bamptons "The missing FAQs about LR".

     

    Cornelia

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 10:09 PM   in reply to Cornelia-I
     
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    Jan 15, 2013 11:31 AM   in reply to Nikonal58

    Edit was opened, no choice for "camera", when camera IS plugged in nothing is recognized. Can't you simply state how to import  pictures from a camera WITHOUT a reader?  All that's happening trying to follow instructions  is that my battery is used for nothing!

     
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    Jan 15, 2013 11:54 AM   in reply to Marie Maier

    Hi Marie, not sure what you mean by "Edit was open, no choice for "camera", when camera is plugged in nothing is recognized".

     

    Can you explain a bit better what steps you have followed? The only "Edit" I can think about in LR is the one in the top menu of LR (which includes Lightroom-File-Edit-Library-Photo-Metadata-View-Window-Help menus). If this is what you are opening, it is not surprising you don't find the importing options there.

     

    The easiest way to import straight from a camera: you should plug in the camera and press the import button in the lower left panel of the Library module, or choose the importing option in the File option of the menu bar on the top of LR.

     

    Once you press the Import button, the import screen will appear. To the top left you will see "Select a Source" and below it a menus with teh available sources and folders. (Upper center holds your moving/copying options; left holds the file handling/destination options).

    If your camera is not listed in the source area, check whether it is automatically shutting off (as most cameras have the option to do in order to save battery). If your camera is off, even if it is physically plugged to the computer it will not be ready to access).

    Personally I would advice you to invest in a card reader if possible, there are some that work nicely and are very inexpensive, as a card reader will help with your camera's battery life (each time you charge/recharge your battery it is affecting it), might prevent accidents (like your camera falling off the table) and will also prevent any automatic disconnections to occur while you're getting ready to import.

     

    If the above does not help in your issue, please write agian but add some more details on what steps you've followed.

    Cheers

     

    *Edit: Just in case, if you are importing straight form teh canera I would suggest you turn on LR first and that when it's running you then plug in the camera to avoid the camera shutting off automatically while LR gets started. Then you'll be able to see right away if the camera is detected at all by LR when plugged in and on.

     
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    Jan 15, 2013 11:52 AM   in reply to Marie Maier

    Edit was opened, no choice for "camera", when camera IS plugged in nothing is recognized. Can't you simply state how to import  pictures from a camera WITHOUT a reader?  All that's happening trying to follow instructions  is that my battery is used for nothing!

    Edit was opened? You don't import from the Develop module, you import by invoking the Import command from the Library Module. It's File->Import Photos and Video

     

    At this point, your camera should appear on the left hand side of the Import dialog box. Many tutorials on how to move forward and complete the import, such as http://tv.adobe.com/watch/getting-started-with-adobe-photoshop-lightro om-4/lightroom-4-importing-and-organizing-your-images/

     
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    Jan 15, 2013 1:37 PM   in reply to Marie Maier

    Marie Maier wrote:

     

    when camera IS plugged in nothing is recognized.

    If your camera can emulate a disk (check options/settings in camera, or read manual...), importing from connected camera should be equivalent to importing from card reader.

     

    If your camera is set up to emulate a disk, then you should see it as a disk when viewing via your operating system - if you don't see it like that, then don't even bother trying via Lightroom (in disk mode anyway - I dunno if Lr includes the ability to import from camera that is *not* emulating a disk).

     

    PS - consider importing from reader instead of camera: that's what most people do (for reasons already mentioned...).

     

    Rob

     
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    Jan 16, 2013 10:00 AM   in reply to Monaggio

    Hello Monaggio!  Thanks so much for a reply –I just didn’t think anyone would bother. I had such great experiences with Ltrm. 1 and right now ’m sorry I upgraded. My camera was immediately recognized and pics were downloaded easily. Now Adobe doesn’t like my camera (Sony DSC H2) anymore, and nothing is working. Thanks for the Memory card thought as I made 2 discoveries after your email. The 1st was that my hub which connects to my camera was never reconnected to the wall after my recent  ‘puter repair so nothing could have happened. An 2nd, there still WAS a Memory Card in the camera I had forgotten about.  As for the Edit: I was following online printed directions to open EDIT>Preferences and Import. Yes, I saw the “select a Source” part but there was nothing that I could select---everything listed is ALREADY ON MY “PUTER and I want to ADD to that and can’t!!  I tried that again AFTER the hub was inserted back in the wall, and dang it—the camera would get shut off. I can’t get it to open at all and I get nowhere. So what good is the Memory card? 

     

     

     

    I see that there are updates available and I would download those now.  If you can help me get over this angst of anger I presently have for Adobe ( camera snobbery?) I would be eternally grateful…. Thanks so much…Marie M

     
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    Jan 16, 2013 10:08 AM   in reply to dj_paige

    Hello Dj

     
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    Jan 16, 2013 11:13 AM   in reply to Marie Maier

    Hi Marie, I'm sorry you're having these issue and hope things work out in the end.  First of all, you're right, one can access Import through the Edit tab in Windows (sorry, I sometimes forget some things are different in WIndows/Mac).

     

    I'm afraid your camera (Sony DSC H2) is not supported by LR4. Here is a list of the cameras that are supported, the list seems to be their most updated one.

    http://helpx.adobe.com/creative-suite/kb/camera-raw-plug-supported-cam eras.html

     

    There are a couple of Sony DSC supported, so I would suggest you try to import your files to the computer without LR (since you're downlowding straight from the camera) and then see if LR can see them properly.

    If this works, you might be unable to import straight form your camera using LR but you could still use LR after you have moved your pics from the camera to the computer, or you will probably be able to import them with LR if you use a card reader instead of the connecting the camera (there are very good ones and with multiple card format slots for 10€).

     

    Could you try and see if this works? Let me know and then we see what to do next.

     

    You mention in your mail your camera shut off an dthat you "could not get it to open at all". If the camera is not conected, is it working?

    At least it's good you located the issue with the hub, that could be an easily overlooked  source of problems later on.

     

    Monaggio

     
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