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Work with the Adobe Bridge cache

Jul 10, 2012 5:03 PM

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 10, 2012 5:03 PM   in reply to Community Help

    I am editing raw photos on my mac laptop pro. I keep getting 'start up disc almost full'. I was reading up on caches but not sure what is the best route. Should I simple make my cache size larger...or does that reduce my disc space, which is my problem. Or should I compact the cache?

     

    Thanks for your help,

    Shirleen Hieb

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 10, 2012 6:09 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    Details, please!

     

    How big is your hard drive?  Is it the only hard drive you have available on your machine, or do you have an external hard drive for Photoshop's Scratch Disk?

     

    How much free hard drive space do you have available?  What is the exact version of the OS you are running, 10.6.8 or 10.7.Lion?  That makes a big difference!

     

    Are we talking about Photoshop CS6 here?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 2:32 AM   in reply to station_two

    I have a 4 gb hard drive. I don't have external drive for scratch

    disk....that sounds like a good thing to do..not sure how you would do it?

    I have no free space and am running os x 10.5.8 with PS CS5. I am at our

    cabin and brought along my extra Drobo which I am reformatting for a back

    up hard drive, so I can remove some of the photos from my laptop. I am a

    photographer. I don't know a lot about PS, just what I need to do for my

    editing. This scratch disk thing is new to me.

     

    Thank you for your help.......

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 6:30 AM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    OUCH!  4 gb?  This can't be true as a just the space for a scratch disk should be at least 30 gigs.

     

    Also, you need at least 10-20% free space on the hard drive for the OS to work.

     

    Externals are OK for storage of info, but not real good for running programs as they are slow.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 7:06 AM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    Shirleen Hieb wrote:

     

    I have a 4 gb hard drive…

     

    No way! 

     

    There's no way a MacBook Pro would have ever been sold with such a tiny hard drive.  It wouldn't even be able to run at all.

     

    You must be confusing RAM with hard drive space. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 8:30 AM   in reply to station_two

    My capacity is 464 GB...is that it? sorry to be so uneducated...I took off

    some photos, freeing up 49 Gb's....

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 11, 2012 9:12 AM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    So is your total free disk space now 49 gb on a 464 gb drive? 

     

    Will let station_two answer if that is adequate as not a mac guy.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 12:27 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    Curt Y wrote:

     

    So is your total free disk space now 49 gb on a 464 gb drive? 

     

    Will let station_two answer if that is adequate as not a mac guy.

     

     

    If Curt's interpretation of Shirleen Hieb's post is correct, then, no, she doesn't have nearly enough available space to run Snow Leopard, Photoshop and Bridge.  Not by a long shot.

     

    You need to free up at least another 120 GB, Shirleen.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 7:29 PM   in reply to station_two

    I put the majority of my photos, that I will be editing, on my second

    Drobo. I now have 207 GB free.

     

    Shirleen

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 12, 2012 8:10 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    Shirleen Hieb wrote:

     

    … I now have 207 GB free…

     

     

    Aaaah, much better!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2012 8:30 AM   in reply to station_two

    Should I put PS cache on external hard drive? Should I upgrade to LION?

     

    Thanks for you help.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 13, 2012 4:47 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    Hopefully Station_Two will log in and answer your question on Lion OS.

     

    You want your Bridge cache and PS scratch disk to be an internal drive.  Externals are too slow and can have permission problems if not configured correctly.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 12:34 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    Curt Y wrote:

     

    …You want your Bridge cache and PS scratch disk to be an internal drive.  Externals are too slow and can have permission problems if not configured correctly.

     

    No, when you're on a laptop, you don't!  Actually, an external FireWire drive is ideal on a Mac, and that's what I run as a dedicated Photoshop CS6 primary scratch drive on my Snow Leopard 10.6.8 MacBook: a dedicated 160 GB FireWire external drive.

     

    FireWire 400 works much better than USB2 on a Mac.

     

     

    Curt Y wrote:

     

    Hopefully Station_Two will log in and answer your question on Lion OS…

     

    Pffffft!    It would take a loaded gun pointed at my head for me to adopt Lion or to advice a good person to upgrade to Lion.  

     

    Please don't ask me for details why, I refuse to spend any more time discussing that abominable Lion OS which is on its way out any day now anyway.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 8:38 AM   in reply to station_two

    station_two wrote:

     

    No, when you're on a laptop, you don't!  Actually, an external FireWire drive is ideal on a Mac, and that's what I run as a dedicated Photoshop CS6 primary scratch drive on my Snow Leopard 10.6.8 MacBook: a dedicated 160 GB FireWire external drive.

     

    FireWire 400 works much better than USB2 on a Mac.

     

    Internal vs external all boils down to connection type and transferer speed.  Here is a clip from the web.

     

    "Bottom line seems to be that a good SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) HDD will often achieve a 70 to 100 MB/s long-term average transfer rate.  I don't know for sure what older IDE drives can do, but I know it is less. For an external HDD connected by USB2 (a slower interface than SATA), the rate is more like 30 to 35 MB/s (USB3 is faster, close to SATA II rates). Firewire 400 is a little slower than SATA II, and Firewire 800 (uncommon on PC's but on many Mac's) may be faster than SATA II. IF your external HDD is a SATA II and connected by a good eSATA port to your machine, it probably will exhibit a speed close to an internal SATA II drive."

     

    What I get from this is the speed is increasing as you go from USB -USB2 - SATA - Firewire 400 - USB3 - SATA II - Firewire 800. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 8:07 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    Curt,

     

    That may be true for PC hardware, I don't presume to know.

     

    But USB 2 implementation on the Mac is far from optimal.  For an external Photoshop scratch disk attached to a Mac laptop, FireWire 400 and 800 are the best solutions.

     

    The one I have attached to my rescued-from-the-trash MacBook is actually an IDE 3.5" in a modern FW400/USB2 enclosure, for a total cost under $30.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 14, 2012 8:43 PM   in reply to station_two

    Think that is what I stated. "What I get from this is the speed is increasing as you go from USB -USB2 - SATA - Firewire 400 - USB3 - SATA II - Firewire 800." 

     

    So the USB2 is two connections slower than Firewire 400,  and Sata II and Firewire 800 are the fastest.  OS should not make any difference.

     

     

     

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 1:09 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    From my personal experience, I would take USB 2 entirely out of that progression as far as the Mac is concerned.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 12:02 PM   in reply to station_two

    I really appreciate you guys hanging in here with me to figure out what I

    need. Unfortunately I think you lost me. Are you saying I should get a

    Firewire 800 external harddrive? PS scratch disc goes on it? I have a

    couple more question but will wait until you answer these, as that might

    answer them.

     

    thanks,

    Shirleen

     

    ps. Tues I go on a 10 canoe trip, so if you respond after that you will

    understand why I am not responding back.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 12:09 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    You need to first find out what your computer would work with.  Does it have a Firewire 400, 800, or Sata II connctors?  Or are you stuck with USB, and then is that USB 2 or 3?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 12:17 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    So, am I trying to connect an external hard drive, that somehow I program

    my PS cache to store on?....and if so, do I have to have it attached

    whenever I work on my photos.....meaning ones I have already edited.

     

    Shirleen

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 12:48 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    Shirleen,

     

    We're talking about Photoshop's primary Scratch Disk here.  I'm not sure what you mean by "Ps cache", there's no such thing.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 1:08 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    Photoshop always creates a scratch disk the instant you open an image file or create a new document.  It uses this scratch disk as a sort of Virtual Memory and it moves stuff in and out of RAM into this Scratch Disk as required.

     

    Photoshop determines the size of this scratch disk based on things like the image size, number of layers, numbers of history states, etc.  Figure on the scratch disk needing up to 100 times or more the size of your largest file multiplied by the number of files you have open.

     

    This scratch disk ideally should be on a physically separate hard drive, because if you keep it on your boot drive it will slo you down as it competes with the swap files of the OS for the use of the drive's read/write head.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 2:02 PM   in reply to station_two

    Thank you...that makes sense. How do I program the scratch disk to be on

    the external hard drive? Do I always have to have that external hard drive

    attached to my laptop in order to access the info on hte scratch disk?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 5:37 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    If you have the scratch disk on an external drive you will have to have it connected and turned on or else PS will not open.

     

    You can set the external scratch disk as primary and C drive as secondary and then perhpaps if the external was not available it would not matter.  But not sure on that.

     

    You never did say what kind of ports your computer has.  If your only option is just a plain USB connector you may be dissapointed in the data transfer speed.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 9:43 PM   in reply to Shirleen Hieb

    Shirleen Hieb wrote:

     

    Thank you...that makes sense. How do I program the scratch disk to be on

    the external hard drive?…

     

    You do that in the Photoshop menu > Preferences > Performance

     

    Use the up and down arrows to position the primary scratch disk on top as number 1.

     

    You want the external drive on top as number 1, and your boot drive (what Windows folks call "the C drive"; Mac drives are not named alphabetically with letters) as the secondary scratch drive, that way it will automatically default to the secondary drive whenever the primary one is is not attached to your laptop.  I name the dedicated drive scratch disk drive Ps_13_scratch_1.  You can name it whatever you want

     

      MacBook_perf_prefs.png

     

    On my desktop Mac I have space on up to six independent drives set as as sequentially secondary scratch disk drives:

     

    Picture 18.png

    Shirleen Hieb wrote:

     

    …Do I always have to have that external hard drive attached to my laptop in order to access the info on hte scratch disk?

     

    No, there will be no "info" kept on that disk as the scratch disk is released (erased) in every case as soon as you close the corresponding image file you had been working on.

     

    When you are out and about with your laptop, if the primary drive is not attached, the secondary drive will be used by default under the scheme explained and illustrated above.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 15, 2012 7:15 PM   in reply to Curt Y

    Curt,

     

    You'll be as expert on the Mac as you are on Windows in no time! 

     

    I've explained above about the boot drive being called "the C drive" in Windows (no such letter-designated-drive animals on the Mac), and I clarified the secondary scratch drive deal, which is the same on both platforms.

     

    Lastly, all MacBook Pros like the OP's have both USB2 and FW ports.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 16, 2012 9:41 AM   in reply to station_two

    station_two wrote:

     

    You'll be as expert on the Mac as you are on Windows in no time! 

    No, say it aint so!  That is where you come in to bing the Mac expertiese, just try to be gentle in your comments.  I throw out a general concept that works in Windows  and hope that a Mac user will take this and correct if wrong.  Omke filled this role well, but he went on vacation to rethink his involement, so not sure he will be back here as much as in the past.  But hope so.  Second opinions are always best.

     

    Seems like less than 6 people care enough about the Bridge users to try to answer any questions.  And at times I feel like I am carrying 90+ % of the load.  Would like to see more participation.  Have let questions go unanswered for a few days, but still no one responds.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 20, 2013 4:20 PM   in reply to Community Help

    I'm curious about something. I have a mail folder that contains all my photo sessions. Within that main folder, each client has their own folder. Within each client's folder are one or more folders..each of these based on the date of the photo session.

     

    After a session, I go into the folder for that session. Bridge creates thumbnails and previews and caches them. If I then go to the client's main folder which contains multiple subfolders (each of which has already generated thumbnails and previews for its contents), and then check to Show Items from Subfolders, Bridge generates thumbnails and previews again for all of the images that already have them.

     

    Question: Is there any way to get Bridge to use the thumbnails and previews already generated and cached instead of re-generating thousands of them?

     

    I am using Bridge CS6 (but it's the same way with CS4) and I have "Always High Quality" selected for generation options. I'm also using "Automatically Export Cache To Folders When Possible". I would prefer not to use embedded thumbnails and previews if that's the solution. I'm more wondering why Bridge wouldn't automatically use what's already been cached.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 20, 2013 5:40 PM   in reply to jugenjury

    It should not create thumbnails twice, but you have to wait until the spinning arrow in lower left corner has stopped to be fully cached.  If you have HQ thumbs and several thousand RAW images that could take an hour or more.

     

    Is there a reason you use Export cache to folders?  I ask as with this option you still have the central cache, and a cache in each of the folder.  The only way to purge this  cache is folder by folder with Tools/Cache/purge cache for xxx folder.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 21, 2013 3:14 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    I didn't think it should create them twice, but it does. Unless I'm missing something, that is. I always do wait until it finishes creating thumbs and previews. In fact, as I'm downloading them from the card I open up the folder and it creates them as they are placed into the folder.

     

    I export to folders because I sometimes copy a folder to another computer or onto a CD to take with me. It's easier if the cache is already available.

     

    Thanks for the response. I'll have to run a test to see exactly what's happening. I may be doing something weird and/or it may be building for images that somehow weren't done yet. It's usually very close to the number of images I've downloaded since the last time I showed items from subfolders.

     

    Thanks, though. I'll figure it out.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 21, 2013 7:22 AM   in reply to jugenjury

    Also check you cache file size.  If you have it set to a discrete size it may be maxed out.  It then overwrites the oldest files.  It is good to at least compact the cache occassionally or dump altogether and let it rebuild.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 21, 2013 7:39 AM   in reply to jugenjury

    jugenjury,

     

    Here is a post in thead "Bridge Slow to load thumbs, building criteria", where Bridge constantly rebuilds thumbnails.  An interesting theory and seems to have some evidence to back it up.  Do you have Generate 100% Previews Checked?    J&K thinks this is problem in certain instances.

     

     

    81. J&HK,

     

        

      May 21, 2013 12:56 AM    in reply to SandraChung 

    Report

    Discovered today, 21 May 2013. HOPEFULLY, the ANSWER!!

     

    Open BRIDGE

     

    Select THUMBNAIL OPTIONS from the icon on the address bar at the right/top of the screen.

     

    This should have HIGH QUALITY PREVIEWS checked.

     

    Check GENERATE 100% PREVIEWS.

     

    Immediately UNCHECK GENERATE 100% PREVIEWS

     

    This should reset the registry key that causes BRIDGE to continuously reload 100% previews of thumbnails!

     

    A further symptom that this is occurring is that once the folder has been re-cached by Bridge (before doing the above), all the image files in that folder will have 100% previews already (no "Loading 100%" when the spacebar has been pressed and a left-click on the image to load the 100% view), even though this switch is un-checked.).

     

    It appears that something causes BRIDGE to set this flag in the registry (incorrectly), while showing the flag as not set in the visual user interface. Setting and un-setting the flag causes the registry key to be correctly re-initialised.

     

    I have encountered this on two PCs running CS6. On my own PC, re-installing CS6 to fix the loss of the connection between BRIDGE and PHOTOSHOP also corrected the above problem, so it appears to be an intermittent fault when CS6 is installed. Sometimes the registry flag is initialised correctly, and sometimes it is not.

     

    The other occurrence was on a friend's PC. That PC has also lost the connection between Bridge and Photoshop, so it could be that the registry "corruption" causes both problems. The continuously loading thumbnails (and displaying the message "Building Criteria ... " while Bridge does this) appear to be resolved by performing the above action (or by re-installing CS6). That PC's owner has now re-loaded a whole swag of his image folders in Bridge. Some have needed to re-cache the thumbnails. When this has been done once (relatively quick, now that Bridge is not re-building 100% previews), returning to that folder loads the Bridge database and thumbnails for that folder almost instantly.

     

    On my own PC, opening a folder containing 900 image files (450 .DNG with original raw embedded + 450 large JPEGs, with user-applied metadata, takes less than 5 seconds). Changing this switch for an open folder immediately precipitates the long process of generating 100% previews for that folder. This is PAINFULLY slow! This operation can only be cancelled by re-setting the switch back to un-checked.

     

    A study of two PCs doth not a representative sample make, I know; but it does seem to validate the theory.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 5, 2013 8:18 AM   in reply to Community Help

    When I start  adobe bridge a window that says there was a problem readind the chache and that I should purge it comes up. When I go to preferences/pruge chache the program does not respond, Ive done it several times and had to force exit of bridge because it stops responding.

    Help plis

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 5, 2013 8:56 AM   in reply to polim27

    Reset the preferences.  Hold down Ctrl key (option on mac) and start Bridge.  You will get a reset window with 3 options.  You can choose all if in doubt.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 5, 2013 10:05 AM   in reply to Curt Y

    thank you very much! that worked out perfectly

     
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