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Problem with nested styles

Aug 18, 2012 9:47 AM

Relatively new user of InDesign is trying to follow instructions in the help files about creating nested styles, and something weird is happening that I can't figure out.

 

The objective: create a paragraph style for the first paragraph following a scene break in a novel with no indent and the first [defined number] of words in all caps.

 

I have the paragraph style and the character style formatted. Each style individually works as expected. But when I select Style Options>Drop Caps and Nested Styles>New Nested Style>choose the character style>through>4 words>OK, the paragraph begins with the first three words in normal case and the caps are applied to the next four words of the first line. Nothing I've tried puts the caps at the beginning of the paragraph and begins counting the number of words from there.

 

I'd appreciate any help to ease my frustration. Thanks.

 

Tosh

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 18, 2012 11:16 AM   in reply to tm6550

    Show us a screen shot of the nested styles dialog nd the basic text formats dialog inthe style definition.... You can embed the scree shots in your post by using the camera icon on the web page like this:

    CameraIcon.png

     

    You should have defined the basic attributes you want for the entire paragraph  as if there were to be no caps, then in the nested styles section you add one new nested style (that applies all caps and nothing else) applied through 4 words, and that's it.

     
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    Aug 18, 2012 12:25 PM   in reply to tm6550

    OK, at first glance everything looks good, except you should leave the font information blank in the character style. This allows you to apply it to any font in any size or style, and allows you to change the underlying paragraph font and have the words to which it is applied chang to that font as well. I noticed that you reduced the size a bit, too, to 11 points. Was that intentional? You can get the same effect by scaling the type in the style to 91%, rather than using specific point sizes. That said, none of that should be keeping the nested style from working.

     

    On a second glance, I see you've set a 10 character Drop Cap as well, and that's where the problem is. The nested word count begins at character 11 -- the drop cap is applied first -- so that's why The E is capitalized then through three more words. The S in Scene you must have typed that way. YOu don't see the drop in the text becausue it is set to only one line, but it is defined. Remove it and all should be well.

     
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    Aug 18, 2012 12:25 PM   in reply to tm6550

    If you check your 3rd screen shot then their are 2 things :-

     

    1) Check the Drop Caps section. You have applied the "None" character style on the first 10 character in the 1 line.

    2) You have applied the "Scene break caps " character style on the 4 words on which the paragraph style is applied.

     

    hence as character style overrides the paragraph style that's why your first 10 character have None style applied to it , then the rest of the paragraph is following the paragraph style property including the nested style.

     

    So , remove the Drop caps which is there in the paragraph style and use just the nested style.

     
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    Aug 18, 2012 12:26 PM   in reply to Manish-Sharma

    Ok, Peter replied before me by just few seconds I guess .

     

    Thanks , Peter

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 18, 2012 1:25 PM   in reply to Manish-Sharma

    Manish-Sharma wrote:

     

    Ok, Peter replied before me by just few seconds I guess .

     

    Thanks , Peter

    Jet lag?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 18, 2012 1:30 PM   in reply to tm6550

    tm6550 wrote:

     

    Peter: I intentionally reduced the size of the caps because I've been told/read that all caps tend to look a bit too large, particularly when they are used for something other than an acronym, for example. I'll try scaling it. I specified the font because this is being done in a template for my novels, which at the moment are being written with the same formatting and I have no plans to change it for the immediate future. In retrospect, I think I assumed that the font would go to the default rather than stick with the underlying paragraph style if I didn't tell it what I wanted.

     

    As I said, your specificity is not fatal, but I like to keep character styles to the bare minimum of attributes that are required to do what is intended so they are more universally usable and so a later decision doesn't come back to bite you. If you define it in the style, it will be formatted according to the definition.

     

    Rather than all caps you might want to give small caps a try (at the same size as the rest of the text), or even bold and small caps.

     
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