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CS6 Recovery REALLY only for "C" drive?

Aug 28, 2012 12:12 PM

I've seen a couple discussions in here about recovery in CS6.  And that it only works if you have your scratch disk on "c"...

 

Has anyone from Adobe CONFIRMED this?  And if so, PLEASE tell me someone is going to FIX such a stupid flaw...

 

Anyhow, this morning, spent an hour or so cleaning up and image...  And FORGOT to save the .psd file before I resized it and save a jpg.  Which NORMALLY isn't a problem - just back up in history and save prior to the crop....  UNFORTUNATELY, Photoshop HUNG while saving the jpg, which it has never done before, and I was unable to save the psd 'cause I kept getting the popup telling me it was saving in background and I'd have to wait.  I finally had to kill the process.

 

Went out and checked my scratch partion - which happens to be "q", and of course theres a recovery folder, in which is a folder with my name...  IN WHICH THERE'S ABSOLUTELY NOTHING..........

 

I'm treating it as a learning experience, ONCE AGAIN...  Kind of like when I used to do Oracle development - the ABSOLUTE requirement was that you save EARLY and OFTEN 'cause the software was GOING to crash, hang, or do SOMETHING disgustingly undesirable.

 
Replies
  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 28, 2012 12:22 PM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    I have personally tried setting my scratch drive to D: and E: (both internal disks) and had no problem with Photoshop creating the auto-save backup.  So it works at least sometimes.  But clearly not always, based on your experience.  I don't recall Adobe commenting on this issue, but I could have just forgotten.

     

    I have to wonder, though...  If your system wouldn't save a file using File - Save As, maybe you had a system problem preventing the saving of anything.

     

    Have you verified by specifically testing that Photoshop is not creating the autosave backup file the way you're currently set up?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • JJMack
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    Aug 29, 2012 3:03 AM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    Each user get their own autorecovery folder like each user has their own Photoshop Preferences stored in system user data areas.

     

    There is no connection that I know of that has anything to do with recovery data and Photoshop scratch disk space. If all thing goes correcty, your recovery folder will be empty when you close down Photoshop for you wil have saved and closed all the documents you had open in Photoshop before you close down Photoshop..

     

    When you enable Automatically Save recovery information every so many xxx time.  Photoshop stores recovery information for open documents, not files in your recovery folder. Photoshop is a document editor not a file editor.

    Should your system or Photoshop crash when you have an open document in Photoshop and that time the documents have been open exceeds the time set in the autorecovery option, Photoshop will have written recovery information for those documents into you recovery folder.

    The next time you start Photoshop it will find your recovery folder is not empty and should be recovery all the document you had open to the to the point it last wrote recovery information.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 28, 2012 4:07 PM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    There is clearly a BUG where for some people it makes the autorecovery folder but does not store a .PSB file if the drive is anything other than C:.

     

    I know of no pattern or predictability to the thing.  There also seems to be no pattern nor predictability to where Photoshop will deposit a whole load of ...MVM... files when you write a .PNG file out either (for me they always go in my TEMP folder on drive C:, but apparently not for some folks). 

     

    It seems incredible to me Adobe can't seem to nail something as simple as where they write files down, but this is the nature of Photoshop.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 28, 2012 4:18 PM   in reply to JJMack

    JJMack wrote:

     

    ... Photoshop store recovery information for open document not files in your recovery folder. Photoshop is a document editor not a file editor...

     

    Photoshop edits documents, yes, but a Photoshop document is stored in a file.

     

    The autosave feature stores a document in a PSB file in a recovery folder.

     

    A PSB file is like a PSD file but without the size limitations of PSD.

     

     

    Info about files:

    http://help.adobe.com/en_US/photoshop/cs/using/WSfd1234e1c4b69f30ea53e 41001031ab64-7758a.html#WSfd1234e1c4b69f30ea53e41001031ab64-7754a

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 28, 2012 4:29 PM   in reply to conroy

    I have always had a scratch disk on a dedicated drive other than "C" since CS3 this was on an XP system. New i7 Windows 7 x64 upgrade for CS6 and my scratch disk is on drive "J" and works just fine. The few times CS6 has actually crashed (twice if my memory serves me corectly) the recovery feature has thanfully worked.

     

    Wonder why this is not consistent for other users, maybe a drive permissions problem?

     

    Scratch.JPG

    Mike

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 28, 2012 4:44 PM   in reply to conroy

    Conroy is right - all it does is SUPPOSED to do is just the same thing as if you did a File - Save As - PSB format into the autorecovery folder for each open file.  Then upon next startup if it finds a .PSB file in the autorecovery folder it opens it and gives it a special document name.

     

    It's probably worth asking davepinminn these questions, though, just to check: 

     

    • Dave, do you have the Automatically Save Recovery Information Every xx Minutes setting enabled?  It's in Edit - Preferences - File Handling.

     

    • Have you tried an experiment where you specifically set the autosave interval to 5 minutes, open a file, make some edit (so that Photoshop thinks it's changed), and just wait 5 minutes?  Does anything show up in your PSAutoRecover folder?

     

    FYI, mine's here:

     

    C:\Users\NoelC\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6\AutoRecover

     

    A question for Adobe:  Why isn't the autorecovery folder location documented anywhere?  Like maybe here: 

     

    http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/preference-file-names-locations-ph otoshop.html

     

    By the way there are still "CS5" strings on that page.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 28, 2012 5:10 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel:  Adobe does make a reference to putting scratch disks on different volumes for performance - which would imply you can use any drive that has enough space, But you are right about the lack of documentation and discussion, in fact the only discussion I am aware of is http://blogs.adobe.com/jkost/2012/04/background-save-and-auto-save-fea tures-in-photoshop-cs6.html and that's about it. I would say somewhat dismal given the hype it was given when announced as a CS6 feature. <Snip> from Performance Recommendations

     

    Scratch Disks  

     

    Set the scratch disk to a defragmented hard disk that has plenty of unused space and fast read/write speeds (see Defragment the hard disk). If you have more than one hard drive, you can specify additional scratch disks. Photoshop supports up to 64 exabytes of scratch disk space on up to four volumes. (An exabyte equals 1 billion GB.)

    If your startup disk is a hard disk (as opposed to a solid-state disk), using a different hard disk for your primary scratch disk can improve performance. If your startup disk is an SSD, there is no benefit to selecting a different disk for your primary scratch disk. Using the SSD for both your system startup disk and your primary scratch volume performs well. And, it's probably better than using a separate hard disk for scratch. See Assigning scratch disks in Photoshop Help for more information.

     

    </snip>

     

    But as you can see zero mention that Autorecover uses the scratch disk and there is no option but to use the scratch disk hierarchy you define in assigning disks in the performance tab.

     

    Mike

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 28, 2012 5:37 PM   in reply to MikeKPhoto

    Indeed, the number of things being well-documented seems to be declining dramatically, even though the price is not.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • JJMack
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    Aug 29, 2012 3:08 AM   in reply to conroy

    conroy2009 wrote:

    Photoshop edits documents, yes, but a Photoshop document is stored in a file.

     

    The autosave feature stores a document in a PSB file in a recovery folder.

     

    A PSB file is like a PSD file but without the size limitations of PSD.

     

    Yes, when Photoshop stores information on disk it stores the information as files.

     

    I would expect Photoshop would choose to save information about open documents in its own PSB format for that file format does not have a filesize limitation where all of its other file formats do.

     

    I felt it was more important to point out that every user that enable this feature gets their own recovery folder.

    That it is located along with their othe user ID adpplication data like their Photoshop Preferences, not in Photoshop scratch disk area.

    That it is normal for this folder to be empty when Photoshop starts.

    That if Photoshop starts and the users recovery folder is not empty Photoshop knows the something went wrong the last time the user used photoshop. 

    For when document are closed in Photoshop any recovery information for that document is removed from their recovery folder.

    It does not matter what file format Photoshop chooses to store the recovery information in.

     

    I keep reading it must on the C: disk.  It more like it where the particular OS used keeps User Application data.  Being a PC user I can choose to install several bootable OS on my PC system hardware.  If I choose to install a bootable  version of Windows 7 on a disk other the C:   I'm quite sure that bootable windows 7 OS would store user application data on the same disk as the OS was installed on which is some disk other then C:.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 28, 2012 9:09 PM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    So test it anyway Dave.  It only takes 5 minutes to see if it creates a .psb file.

     

    Then you'll know if it's an ongoing failure of Photoshop to write an autosave file, or something that went wrong with your system that one time.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 29, 2012 5:03 AM   in reply to JJMack

    JJMack wrote:

     

    I felt it was more important to point out that every user that enable this feature gets their own recovery folder.

    That it is located along with their othe user ID adpplication data like their Photoshop Preferences, not in Photoshop scratch disk area.

     

     

     

    I don't know about Windows, but with Photoshop on OS X, the location of the auto-recovery folder is never alongside the user's Ps preferences files. It can be alongside the user's Ps Presets folder or in another volume.

     

    There is a "Scratch Disk" list of drive volumes in Ps Preferences > Performance. The list can be ordered by the user. The first enabled volume in that list when Ps is launched will contain my active auto-recovery folder.

     

    If the boot volume is designated as primary scratch then the active auto-recovery folder is:

     

    /Users/<user name>/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Adobe Photoshop CS6/AutoRecover

     

    If another volume is designated as primary scratch then the active auto-recovery folder is:

     

    /Volumes/<volume name>/PSAutoRecover/<user name>

     
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  • JJMack
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    Aug 29, 2012 9:37 AM   in reply to conroy

    Yes it related to the OS Photoshop is being run on.  There are two version of Photoshop one for Mac OS and one for Windows. So a Windows Application and a Mac Application.  I'm sure Adobe would want to be a well behavied application in both environments and would abide by how application should be coded for the OS being used. 

     

    Windows has a convention as to where application should store user specfic applicatiod data.  Data that is not common to all users. For example the Photoshop execution module itself that is shared by all users there is only one copy.  Adobe uses windows OS version conventions for saving user specfic data like preferences and recovery data. 

     

    If Mac the various Mac OSs have some convention Adobe would most like use it rather then inventing their one convention. 

     

    Microsoft has change the location of where such data get stored  several times over the various versions of windows. from NT to XP to Vista to Windows 7.  But as far as I remenber this data has always been stored on the same disk that the system is installed on.  This makes sense to me.  Application are normally installed on the system disk also but the install location can normally be changed during application installation.

     

    Photoshop has been around for over 20 years.  Twenty years ago Apple was using their own OS Apple OS perhaps OS7 or OS9 these were poor operating systems. When Steve came back into Apple from his Pixar and NexXTStep companies he reliazed the problems Apple was having with their OS and their problems with IBM and getting a powerpc for mobile laptop devices.  Steve also knew the versitility and power of Unix for that what he used for NeXTStep.  Steve realized it was a good time to switch both hardware and OS.  So he switched Apple to machines to Intell processors and to a Unix version he named OSx.  Unix has many names, AT&T Unix, Berkeley's BSD, Redhat, Linux, AIX, NeXTStep, OSx...   Started at Bell labs I beleive in 1969 for a small computer with a name like PDP7.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 29, 2012 9:39 AM   in reply to JJMack

    JJMack wrote:

     

    Adobe uses windows OS version conventions for saving user specfic data like preferences and recovery data. 

     

    Unfortunately that's not true 100%, and I think that could be part of the issue here.

     

    It seems that parts of Photoshop do use the standard locations some of the time.

     

    However, under no conditions is it expected that a user would normally store user-specific data at the root directory of a drive volume (e.g., D:\), yet that's exactly where it tries to put it if you select that drive for scratch.  And I'm not just talking about the big scratch files normally seen, but also stuff like that bevy of ...MVM... files that just seem to show up wherever.  Some folks even see those being written to the root folder on external drives!

     

    The head-scratcher in this is that it's not deterministic, and by Adobe's lack of participation in these kinds of threads it seems likely - incredible as it sounds - that Adobe doesn't actually KNOW what folders they're going to be using.

     

    I would have thought that they'd have nailed down exactly how file access is going to work for brand new features, such as auto-save, but yet here we have people reporting the folders get created but without the files being written.  And absolutely no documentation describing how it works and where the files are supposed to be written.  What do YOU imply from that?

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 29, 2012 9:54 AM   in reply to JJMack

    JJMack wrote:

     

     

    Windows has a convention as to where application should store user specfic applicatiod data.  Data that is not common to all users. For example the Photoshop execution module itself that is shared by all users there is only one copy.

     

     

    The same as OS X.

     

     

    Adobe uses windows OS version conventions for saving user specfic data like preferences and recovery data.

     

     

    The same as Photoshop on OS X.

     
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  • JJMack
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    Aug 29, 2012 10:17 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    Unfortunately that's not true 100%, and I think that could be part of the issue here.

     

    It seems that parts of Photoshop do use the standard locations some of the time.

     

    However, under no conditions is it expected that a user would normally store user-specific data at the root directory of a drive volume (e.g., D:\), yet that's exactly where it tries to put it if you select that drive for scratch.  And I'm not just talking about the big scratch files normally seen, but also stuff like that bevy of ...MVM... files that just seem to show up wherever.  Some folks even see those being written to the root folder on external drives!

     

    The head-scratcher in this is that it's not deterministic, and by Adobe's lack of participation in these kinds of threads it seems likely - incredible as it sounds - that Adobe doesn't actually KNOW what folders they're going to be using.

     

    I would have thought that they'd have nailed down exactly how file access is going to work for brand new features, such as auto-save, but yet here we have people reporting the folders get created but without the files being written.  And absolutely no documentation describing how it works and where the files are supposed to be written.  What do YOU imply from that?

     

    -Noel

    I can not fully agree whith you here the above is more your own view on how things should be we all have our own views as does Adobe.  While each user can set the disk that they want Photoshop to use for temp scrach data  the setting clearly shows that the files will be in the disk root.   I feel this is good for when Photoshop failes to clean up after itsselef these file stick out like a saw thumb and are quickly deleted by me.  I would hate to be running out of disk space on some drive because Photoshop failed to clean up and where I would have to search for where these files are and worst case would be if ever user had their own scratch areas not in the root. I feel it would be a bigger mess.  The intent of this preference is to enable the user to seperate the devices used by the system and photoshop for basiclly paging storage. These files have a temp extention and I like the fact the are always in volumes roots.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Aug 29, 2012 10:29 AM   in reply to JJMack

    I'm not describing how things should be, I'm describing how they are.

     

    What SHOULD be done is to offer the user the ability to specify, in no uncertain terms, where to store things, including volume AND path information.  In that fashion a scratch folder could be created just for the task, and it would be equally easy to clean up.  You could even continue to use the root folder if that suits you. But it doesn't suit everyone, and it isn't the way modern operating systems are heading.

     

    Think about how computers are used in a corporate environment, for example...  Most IT people don't want to grant Full Control access to allow users to change things in the root folders of their additional hard drives.  I suspect most users in that situation actually just let it default to the Startup volume rather than fight a battle with IT for custody of their second hard drive.

     

    As many unexpected problems as Photoshop traditionally has with writing files, though I haven't personally seen any evidence of it screwing up disks, do you really want it writing in the root folder? 

     

    I thought you were all about how buggy Photoshop is. 

     

    -Noel

     
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  • JJMack
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    Aug 29, 2012 10:56 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel Carboni wrote:

     

    What SHOULD be done is to offer the user the ability to specify, in no uncertain terms, where to store things, including volume AND path information.  In that fashion a scratch folder could be created just for the task, and it would be equally easy to clean up.  You could even continue to use the root folder if that suits you. But it doesn't suit everyone, and it isn't the way modern operating systems are heading.

     

    Think about how computers are used in a corporate environment, for example...  Most IT people don't want to grant Full Control access to allow users to change things in the root folders of their additional hard drives.  I suspect most users in that situation actually just let it default to the Startup volume rather than fight a battle with IT for custody of their second hard drive.

    To me the above two seem to be in conflect.  The corporate environment want control over the user and provides an IT staff  to manages the corporations assits. Photoshop needs to be able to run in and out of the Corporate enviromnent and every Corporate enviroment is not the same. How a corporation manages Personal Computers will be different from the way they mange mainfarmes and servers.   Perhaps what Adobe should do is to change the way Photoshop installs and during the install give the installer to ability to assign scratch disk spaces.  What should be done is to try to come up with standards that are user friendle and easy to implement. Without standards what SHOULD be done is can not be done for what should be done is not documentated.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Sep 5, 2012 1:57 PM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    Dave, just to be thorough, try it again, and when you see the file there, this time go into Task Manager, Processes tab, and forcibly end the Photoshop.exe process (or whatever it takes to do the equivalent operation on a Mac; I forget what system you have).

     

    Then start up Photoshop and ensure the recovered file opens automatically.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 10, 2012 6:39 PM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    Hi all,

     

    Well I just had photoshop crash cs6. I am running Windows 7 x64. Running CS6 and had the crash. I had my scratch drives set to D and E partitions (same drive partitioned C D E). I enabled auto save every 10 minutes. I was hoping that this feature worked after what just happened. Reopened photoshop and nothing, no backup copy opened. Did a search for a .psb file and nothing on any drive.

     

    What has Adobe done ot get this issue fixes? Its obiviously not even just a windows/mac issue, both platforms.

     
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  • JJMack
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    Dec 10, 2012 9:31 PM   in reply to fcastro75

    I find that Photoshop Autorecovery does not always seem to work.  I have have crashes where it works and others where it doesn't.  Yon can check if there is a chance that it may work by seeing if anything is ever being auto-saved. I also think that auto-saved files may be deleted when you do a save and continue the edit a document. If that is true the document will not be auto-saved for an other ten minuets if changes have been made. These file are save into you windows user tree in "C:\Users\Your User ID\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6\AutoRecover" You can look into that folder when Photoshop is up and you have a document open for more the ten minuets that changes have been made to. Files in it will have name like "_documentnanet2A1223849636C29A5678529908A9E3DC.psb"  The document you working on are saved there if the document is not new it associated file can be anywhere  on any drive on the network on removable media. All recovery files are  written to you c: drive user area.

     

    Even when the feature works you still lose all your history states and the last few things you did.  Adobe should fix Photoshop Auto recovery should only need for hardware failures.

     

    There is no good reasons I can think of these days for partitioning drive, with Raide you can even stripe across many drives. Partitioning drives and putting swapping paging and data in different partitions on the same drive seems like a real bad idea to me.  I would think that would create a lot a real long arm seeks and hurt performance.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 10, 2012 10:07 PM   in reply to JJMack

    It seems quite straightforward here. There is a PSAutoRecover folder in my scratch drive, a .psb with the image name and a serial number. I did the test as Noel outlined, using process kill to dump PS. Upon reopening PS, my file showed up labelled "name-Recovered", as it did when I did have a PS crash recently.

     

    Further, there is no "C:\Users\Your User ID\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6\AutoRecover" on my computer.

     

    There is a folder with my name Hudechrome in scratch. After the file appeared, I deleted it (it was a test copy) and the Hudechrome folder on scratch is empty.

     

    Scratch is on a separate drive from "C".

     

    Second Edit: I suspect the reason no indication of an AutoRecover exists in Roaming is because I don't have scratch on C in any way, including as a second or third option.

     

    Message was edited by: Hudechrome

     
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  • JJMack
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    Dec 11, 2012 4:14 AM   in reply to Hudechrome

    Hudechrome wrote:

     

     

    Further, there is no "C:\Users\Your User ID\AppData\Roaming\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6\AutoRecover" on my computer.

     

    Scratch is on a separate drive from "C".

     

    Second Edit: I suspect the reason no indication of an AutoRecover exists in Roaming is because I don't have scratch on C in any way, including as a second or third option.

    Are you sure there is no AutoRecover folder in Roaming? Microsoft and Apple like to hide files and  folders from users by default.  Have you set your Windows  Folder Options View tab Hidden Files and Folders setting from its windows default setting to show hidden files, folders or drives?

     

    I do not believe on windows systems Photoshop stores recovery files on disk you set as scratch disk in you Photoshop Preferences.  Photoshop store many thing in you user id user area.  Things like Your Photoshop Preferences thing related to your userid.  If you look at Noel append above his his recovery folder is in roaming.  Conroy may be elsewhere he use a Mac ant there are differences between MAC and PC Photoshop versions.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 11, 2012 6:43 AM   in reply to JJMack

    I am reasonably facile with my OS. No files are hidden of the type that we are considering. (Some files will not allow me to view, however, unless I use a free file viewer, in which case, the files are coded.)

     

    I'm stand by what I wrote. The file is (was!) in AutoRecover, on my scratch, in a folder named Hudechrome which is the computer name.

     

    (Seeing is believing_

    AutoRecover.JPG

    Roaming.JPG

    Above:Roaming file.

     

    There is an AutoRecover folder in System 32

     

    Message was edited by: Hudechrome

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 11, 2012 6:57 AM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    Exactly as I found.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 11, 2012 7:14 AM   in reply to DavePinMinn

    I'm fond of saying (and I'll repeat it here):

     

    Windows and its applications prefer everything on drive C:.

     

    There are a variety of reasons, from it being more likely the software was tested in default configuration to it being more likely the drive was reformatted when Windows was installed and thus has correct permissions.

     

    And that's not to say a system can't be made to work with multiple drives.  It certainly can.  But things are just more likely to work and keep working if you use drive C:.

     

    If you should create a new system, consider provisioning a very large RAID array (e.g., 2 TB) of SSDs and run everything from drive C: (i.e., OS, applications, data, swap, scratch). 

     

    Yes, I know 2 TB may not be large enough for some uses, and you can certainly have huge spinning drives D: and above for data that you access manually - e.g., by copying to/from C:.  Point nothing you use in normal operation to a drive other than C:.

     

    I practice this and it works.

     

    -Noel

     
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  • JJMack
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    Dec 11, 2012 7:32 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Noel you must be getting on in age like me and have given up on fighting wind mills.  I don't know how Peter played Don and fought wind mills at an advance age seems more like a idealistic dream to me than reality.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 11, 2012 8:06 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    It doesn't appear to me that Adobe goes along with Everything.

     

    I don't use your system (too expensive) and it works.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 11, 2012 8:14 AM   in reply to JJMack

    I know I am older than Noel, and at least your age or older. I didn't even acquire a computer until '99. Before that, I used a computer at the library or at work.

     

    It was a real struggle. I went back to electronics in '98, and had to learn 3.1.1 and 5. Plus a bit of Pascal. My darkroom had already been dismantled and I was using service bureaus for all my processing (commercial anyway!) So, I had no recourse except to go digital, first from scanning and eventually full image sourcing. Going back to electronics then saved my bacon. And the hourly rate then, in real dollars, was 3X what I can make today in the same field.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
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    Dec 11, 2012 8:29 AM   in reply to JJMack

    I don't believe I've fought windmills, assuming you mean struggling with something for the sake of the struggle.  When I struggle with things it's for the sake of understanding.

     

    Like you (and most folks) I like things to WORK so I can struggle with my work products, instead of with my tools.

     

    My Windows 7 and 8 books are both oriented to making Windows lean and reliable, so it can step out of the way and let you get your work done.  I found it takes so many things to accomplish this that I had to write 100+ page books on the subject.

     

    This is the nature of today's mass market software.  Never quite finished, never quite right, but if you're crafty you can find a way to get value from it.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Dec 11, 2012 8:37 AM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    I think the never quite right really is a specific configuration for a particular use. Configuring for games is going to be different than for editing, and an OS needs to be reasonably useable  out of the box to do both.

     

    That being said, my optimum computer is one where I can start any operation my simply saying "Computer...." ala StarTrek.

     

    They got that righ in the 60's!

     
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  • JJMack
    6,049 posts
    Jan 9, 2006
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    Dec 11, 2012 9:48 AM   in reply to Hudechrome

    When one has pointy ears all computers are submissive and bow to the mere thoughts that happen between those ears.

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,534 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
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    Dec 11, 2012 1:01 PM   in reply to Hudechrome

    Just have to remember to build in the ability to overload the system by convincing it that it's not logical.

     

    -Noel

     
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    Dec 11, 2012 1:14 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    Spock has spoken!

     

    There was a story once about  the nations of the world getting together to build the computer to be the absolute best. When they got it running, they needed a profound question to ask it. So they decided to ask: "Is there a God?" The behemoth hummed along for a few minutes, then flashed the answer:

     

    There is now!

     
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    Dec 11, 2012 1:20 PM   in reply to JJMack

    Roger Penrose, in his book "Shadows of the Mind" has a fantasy dialog called "Reductio ad absurdum"between a computer builder and his creation  about an arrogant computer and the conversation between it and the builder, named Albert Impersonator, aka AI.

     

    Fun read, especially the end.

     
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