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Lightroom changes the appearance of my images after import

Oct 18, 2012 5:09 PM

I dont understand this or why it does it. my preferences has everything unchecked.

I import my images

i see the thumbnails which look fine but when i click on image, it displays on my 2nd monitor and looks perfect. but here is the problem, a second later it makes an adjestment to it which ruins my image, it makes it too bright. its like its auto toning yet i dont understand why it must do this.

 

my goal is to simply view my image on 2nd monitor w/o lightroom making any adjustments to it.

 

how can i prevent this or why is it happening?

 

can anyone please help me...any help would be greatly appreaciated.

 

Message title was edited by: Brett N

 
Replies 1 2 3 Previous Next
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 3:35 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    Are you recording images in RAW format?

    If so, this post might have the explanation.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 4:37 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    Your photos are perfect out of camera. Then you should take jpeg photo only instead of raw.

    In short, whatever you see when you first load your photos in Lightroom are embedded jpg file created by your camera. LR only display it briefly, then LR will give you your "real" RAW file. You can adjust your RAW file to look similar to your jpg. If you're lazy and think your jpg is perfect, then just shoot jpg only.

    LR doesn't ruin your photos. It gives you the "real" look of your RAW. There is nothing you can do about it. If you prefer the jpg photo, use your camera-provided-software.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 5:02 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    Can you post the specs of your camera and what special setting, if any,  you use to capture the images.

     

    This is important since LR is only processing the raw data with its own recipe and cannot apply any special settings you may have used in your camera.

     

    Look at it this way, if you consider the rendition of the raw data by your camera to be perfect, why are you spending a lot of money to purchase Lightroom to provide you with the same rendition.

     

    Adobe has developed a special software to provide you with the development tools to process the raw data from your camera, which they believe will enable you to create a superior rendition.

     

    If you provide some more info, then users of the same or similar model camera can offer some advice in "cooking" the raw data. If you choose to shoot raw, then you have to play the role of the "chef", the tools are there.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 5:13 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    One other thing, is your monitor profiled/calibrated using a hardware tool like iOne Display or Spyder. Lightroom color working space is a derivative of ProPhoto RGB and the jpeg thumbs from your camera are sRGB a very basic color space. Maybe your monitor cannot display the correct colors/tones from Lightroom.   

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 5:26 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    i want lightroom to NOT ruin my image I want it to NOT tone or do whatever it is its doing.

     

    its applying a change to my image.

    You are the one misunderstanding.

     

    At first, you see the JPG preview, with in camera modifications, based upon your camera settings. (also, in Windows explorer, you are seeing the JPG preview, with in camera modifications, based upon your camera settings.)

     

    So Lightroom shows you the JPG preview until it can render the RAW image and display it on your screen. So, next you see the Lightroom rendered RAW photo, which has none of the in camera JPG modifications. In layman's terms, Lightroom is showing a representation of the image as your sensor saw it. So Lightroom is NOT changing the appearance of your image; it is showing you the image as the sensor saw it; the in camera algorithms that create the JPG are changing the appearance of your image.

     

    There is no way for Lightroom to match, automatically, the in-camera modifications, based upon your camera settings. It doesn't know about your camera settings, and it doesn't have the same algorithms that are in the camera chip that are used to produce the JPG.

     

    You must modify the RAW image yourself, if straight out of the camera, it is not pleasing to you. Most people who use Lightroom will tell you that they can produce more pleasing images using Lightroom that the JPG that comes out of the camera. But you have to edit the image yourself.

     

    There is no way in Lightroom to disable the way it handles RAW photos. Your only choice would be to use different software, like the camera manufacturer's software, which can interpret the camera settings.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 5:54 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    What camera are you using? Are you using any special settings e.g. Active D Lighting?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 6:24 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    ninjapimp wrote:

     

    i just dont understand why it has to modify the image after it firstly displays it fine

     

    This is the most frequently asked of the frequently asked questions:

     

    http://forums.adobe.com/thread/358016?tstart=30

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 6:31 PM   in reply to Lee Jay

    Lee, this was linked in the very first response by martin-s.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 7:21 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    That post applies to thumbnails, small and large previews.

     

    Your camera turns the raw data into an image, according to the camera's algorithms and settings.

     

    LR turns the raw data into an image, according to Adobe's algorithms and the settings you choose.

     

    These are different images.

     

    When you first import, you see the camera's image.

     

    When time is available, LR renders its own image.

     

    If you think some auto tone is going on, look at the settings on the image in question in Develop, and see if you see anything different than the defaults (all zeros in the Basic panel, for example).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 7:53 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    The OP still doesn't understand the whole concept of what Lightroom is doing. Every raw image includes a JPEG preview. Lightroom displays that preview when it first loads the raw image. That JPEG image has been modified by different camera settings. The camera is what modified the file. Lightroom ignores those camera settings and builds a preview of the "raw" data captured by the camera. Again, your camera is what applied the settings to that JPEG preview.

     

    In my opinion, the first thing to do when starting to use Lightroom is to adjust one of your images so that it looks right. Then, set those settings as the default settings for your camera. Those settings will then be applied whenever new images are imported into Lightroom. Of course, there will be certain situations where you will need different settings for different lighting situations. To accommodate those situations you can create presets.

     

    The people who have tried to explain what is happening to your images are not misunderstanding the situation. You are misunderstanding what must be done to make Lightroom work for you rather than you having to change everything that Lightroom does. Take the time to create your own set of defaults. Then you will be much happier with the way Lightroom works for you. If you don't want to do that then you are going to have to do a lot of unnecessary corrections.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 8:37 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    ninjapimp wrote:

     

    my thumbnails looks fine

    its the fullsize that changes.

     

    The fullsize should look very similar to the thumbnail, once Lightroom has replaced *both* the embedded thumbnail & fullsize views with Lightroom's renditions. Those renditions may look very different than the camera-generated thumbnails/full-size views which are displayed immediately after importing (which are the same images that Windows Explorer displays).

     

    If this is not the case, then you have something wonky going on.

     

    I assume the "problem" is just what everybody else has been saying, but if not, then perhaps you could catch Lr in the act and post a screenshot, eh?

     

    Do you understand how Lightroom works? - i.e. it displays a jpeg preview generated by camera first (embedded in raw file for "quick" viewing), then renders a different version from the raw data and displays that.

     

    If you don't like the Lightroom rendition, then probably you need to change the default camera profile to one of the camera emulation profiles, instead of Adobe Standard. And/or, you may need to tweak other settings too since Lightroom won't automatically apply stuff like intelligent contrast processing, which your camera is applying.

     

    Also, I recommend shooting raw+jpeg for a while, and importing separately - at least until you gain experience with Lightroom. That way you can compare the in-camera jpeg to the raw as edited in Lightroom. You should be able to create a better looking photo by editing the raw in Lightroom. If you can't, then something is amiss.

     

    PS - There are things you can do to have the initial Lightroom rendition more closely match your camera's rendition, but I don't do those things, since once I get the image into Lightroom, I no longer care what the camera-generated image looks like.

     

    Rob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 13, 2012 11:22 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    Please post samples to see if there's a problem with LR. I assume it's the JPG vs. RAW "problem"....

     

    When shooting RAW you get an almost raw file. "Poblem" is that you get fooled by the camera display showing the JPG produced in camera from the RAW and fooled by the histogram displayed on the camera screen which was taken from the JPG and not from the RAW file.

     

    Another player in the games is again your camera. If you set it to - what Canon calls- a certain picture style this only has effect on the sharpness, contrast, tint etc. of the JPG. The more the JPG gets tweaked in camera the more will your RAW look different when rendered in LR.

     

    When working with picture styles you might want to browse the web to find presets or camera calibration settings to be used in LR. These presets tweak your RAW to make it look like a JPG with a certain picture style.

     

    I shoot RAW to be independend from Canons in camera presets, noise reduction, sharpening, picture processing etc.

     

    I wrote that you get an "almost" raw image after importing to LR. LR has built-in settings to mimic the look of a neutral, in camera produced JPG depending on the camera model upon import. For me this works pretty well but there are lots of discussions on how raw a RAW should be inside LR. Some like to start working on their images frame scratch, means a dull looking, very flat image giving them full control and a start from zero.

     

    Oli

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 14, 2012 1:09 AM   in reply to ninjapimp

    I think that your default settings are the fault here.  In the develop module, with one of the screwed up images chosen, hold down alt on a pc opt on a mac and click "set default" on the lower right corner in lightroom.  Holding down alt changes the "reset" button to "set default".  After you click on this, in the new window, select "Restore Adobe Default Settings".  This should result in a "better" rendition of your previews.  Now, if you want to make changes (including camera profiles that may be available to match your in camera processing) to the "default" settings, you can and make these new settings your default by alt/opt>set default>Update to current settings. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 14, 2012 6:54 AM   in reply to ninjapimp

    ninjapimp wrote:

     

    is it possible there is a Nikon authorized preset for nikon d800?

     

    Your camera has a zillion different possible settings for the way it renders the images.  Adobe has provided a few "camera matching profiles" installed with LR for those that actually want the camera's image, and also want to shoot raw.

     

    Camera Calibration panel, Profile: box, select whatever you currently have selected in-camera.  This won't include any adjustments you've made in-camera to sharpness, contrast, saturation, or whatever else Nikon allows you to change, including D-lighting and such.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 14, 2012 7:20 AM   in reply to ninjapimp

    is it possible there is a Nikon authorized preset for nikon d800?

    Yes, it is called Capture NX2. It does everything you have been asking for. But it doesn't work with Lightroom.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2012 10:05 AM   in reply to ninjapimp

    Ninjapimp,


    I feel your pain!  I am having the exact same issue but it turns my image way way too dark.  I understand what everyone is saying about jpegs out of camera for the preview versus raw files in LR.  This still does not seem to make sense.  In my case, the image on the camera screen and thumbnail preview when initially viewed in LR looks beautiful, sharp, and well exposed.  After the "loading," completes, the image turns dark. 

     

    At first, I didn't fret and attempted to adjust exposure, fill light, etc.  Now my image looks grainsy as SH*T!  Complete loss of detail.  Not how I exposed the picture and the picture out of LR is unusable. 

     

    Someone please help.  This is not just a "JPEG" issue.  It seems like my camera (Sony Nex 7) can understand data in the file that LR cannot.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2012 10:17 AM   in reply to mcrckrck01

    Can you post a public download link for one of your images after uploading them to something like www.dropbox.com or www.yousendit.com?  The graininess is normal if you are brightening dark areas, because that brightening is a digital increase in ISO of those areas.   The camera-JPGs will have had noise-reduction applied to them and in LR you need to turn up the Luminance NR because the Adobe factory-default is zero.

     

    Since there is so much difference in exposure between the LR and NEX7 images, perhaps you have a setting enabled in camera that auto-fixes exposure problems or auto-compresses highlights.  Highlight compression is done by the camera unexposing the images by a stop or more, and then digitally adding brightness to only the darker area—like Fill-Light or increasing Shadows does in LR.

     

    If you are going to be using LR then you should turn off the camera fixes because they mask exposure problems when you view the images on your camera’s LCD.

     

    What version of LR are you using, specifically?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2012 10:39 AM   in reply to ssprengel

    I am using Lightroom 3. 

     

    I just re-imported a set of pictures and took screen grabs showing what is happening as previews are rendered. 

     

    Each photo starts off with quality in the thumbnail, then one by one, they turn dark.

     

    The below links are to my dropbox showing the screen grabs.  I want to stress that each of the photos in the series shown were taken with the same ISO, shutter speed, and aperture value.  In the camera, they look great...in LR they go black as the previews are rendered.  I have also included a full size showing with the exposure and fill light added. total grain! 

     

    One set of pictures was shot at ISO 200 so I cannot understand why so much noise is visible.

    Thanks in advance for any help.

     

     

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/2ntsml4qsd6wwyw/Screen%20Shot%202012-09-15%2 0at%2010.28.44%20AM.png

     

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/r98rsaos5n01l05/Screen%20Shot%202012-09-15%2 0at%2010.20.33%20AM.png

     

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/1ypt0cd4jav8c4i/Screen%20Shot%202012-09-15%2 0at%2010.22.37%20AM.png

     

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/62wpo2bvoldx2ne/Screen%20Shot%202012-09-15%2 0at%2010.23.03%20AM.png

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2012 10:45 AM   in reply to mcrckrck01

    You might try turning off "DRO" when you are shooting Raw.

     

    As I understand it, this feature (each camera brand uses a different term for it) works by underexposing the image in absolute terms so as to reduce highlight clipping in the Raw sensor data. The camera then adds back custom processing later, to brighten the picture up to a normal looking JPG result. When it comes to Raw, certain software - but it seems, not LR - will automatically do the same.

     

    Lightroom, where it lacks this special corrective function, simply sees the reality - an underexposed Raw file - with some increased shadow noise, as an expected consequence. This naturally tends to appear darker overall, and that takes some care to retrieve. Some methods are better than others, for doing that.

     

    Disabling this special mode in the camera results in a more conventionally and properly exposed image with Raw values and highlight information that are closer to Lightroom's expectations.

     

    Given good camera technique - avoiding both undesired highlight clipping AND systematic underexposure - optimal results are IMO more easily achieved, this way, out of LR.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2012 11:48 AM   in reply to mcrckrck01

    We believe you as far as what it is that is happening that the image starts out ok and then darkens, it is why and what to do about it that is in question.

     

    Do you have any in-camera lighting or toning or highlight-compression settings set, anything that changes the image before it is written as a JPG?  Another reply, above, mentions a specific setting to check as DRO – perhaps Dynamic Range Optimization.  If you have this enabled it explains what you’re seeing and the remedy is to turn it off so that your camera is properly exposing the images. 

     

    To reinterate, with DRO enabled, the camera is purposely underexposing your images then brightens the shadows in camera and applies noise-reduction before writing the JPG or embedding the preview.  This is only convenient if you are using camera-jpgs and only confusing if you are doing RAW with a non-Sony product such as LR or Photoshop from Adobe.   Using Adobe products you can brighten the shadows yourself and apply highlight compression and add noise-reduction, but because LR is written by Adobe not Sony, the adjustments are not automatic like they are in the camera.  You are in charge and you have to do them. If you need to underexpose your own images using a negative EV-setting to keep the highlights from clipping, then you can do that, yourself, but you'll know you've done that and will expect to do your own boost in exposure in LR and add more noise-reduction than normal.

     

    If you still need us to look at things, please upload ORIGINAL raw files to www.dropbox.com and post the public download link so others can try and see if the results are the same for them.   It’s possible something else is going on like you've set your default settings to extra dark when you import the images.

     

    For screen-grabs as you’ve used dropbox for, this time, it is easier for anyone reading your message if you just attach the screen-capture image to the message on the web version of the forum using the camera icon above where you type in your message on the forum.  This makes them visible within the message instead of having to open them in another browser window. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2012 12:42 PM   in reply to ssprengel

    Thanks to both.

     

    I did have Dynamic Range Optimization turned on and set at the highest setting.  I now know to keep that thing turned off.

     

    Also, if it helps anyone else with the same issue, I used my original Sony CD and used their import software (Image Data Converter) and this program imports the photos similar to the Sony Image.  It doesn't really help with the Lightroom issue but I at least am able to see the images now as the camera shows them to me and I can convert to JPEG with more info in the file. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 15, 2012 4:13 PM   in reply to mcrckrck01

    mcrckrck01,

     

    Assuming Sony's DRO is not doing something to the raw data itself, other than a reduced exposure I mean (and *probably* it isn't), it may still have the same value to use it in conjunction with Lightroom, as it does in conjunction with any other converter. The difference is that you will need to take responsibility for compensating for the underexposure in Lightroom. i.e. what it does is assess whether highlights will be blown out at normal exposure, and then "exposes to the left". It then records the fact that this has happened, so processing software can compensate. Lightroom misses the memo, so to speak, so your photo appears dark (and maybe overly contrasty). DRO is still good to have on in-camera *if* you are shooting high dynamic range shots where highlights should be protected if possible, *otherwise* it's better to turn it off.

     

    Don't get me wrong: if you want your pictures to look in Lightroom, after initial raw conversion, more like they looked in camera, then you must turn DRO off. But if you want the full advantage that DRO offers, in Lightroom, then turn it on when it's appropriate, off when appropriate, and compensate in Lightroom, either manually (how I do it) or use ExifMeta/CollectionPreseter combo to auto-compensate in Lightroom, like your camera and Sony software does - more info available upon request.

     

    Rob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 7:06 AM   in reply to ninjapimp

    Indeed something is happening. LR is changing the appereance of the RAW files, just as described (loads fine and after a second or two, it changes its looks).

    In my case, it is applying some color tone and vignetting, it is not helping the look of the image at all.

    I have been a user of LR since its first version and had not encounter this problem until recent. I shoot on Canon's 5DM2 and for what I have been able to tell from the posts, it is also happening to Nikons and Sonys. It is not a monitor issue since mine are also calibrated. I do architectural work and my camera settings have not changed, I shoot RAW with everything zeroed out and neutral. I have tried several options, including going back to Adobe's default settings without luck.

    So far I have not been able to figure out what is wrong nor find an answer or explanantion for this issue.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 7:32 AM   in reply to HAHPHAEK

    Indeed something is happening. LR is changing the appereance of the RAW files, just as described (loads fine and after a second or two, it changes its looks).

     

    ...

     

    So far I have not been able to figure out what is wrong nor find an answer or explanantion for this issue.

    As has been explained in this thread numerous times, there is nothing wrong, this is the way Lightroom is supposed to handle RAWs. It shows the JPG preview embedded in the RAW file until it has time (usually a few seconds) to render its own version of your RAW photo, which of course looks different than the JPG preview.

     

    I understand you do not like it. But you cannot turn off this behavior of Lightroom. You can adjust your Lightroom import preset to produce photos more to your liking. Or you can shoot JPG, in which case Lightroom does not change the appearance of the JPG created by your camera. Or you can use the manufacturer's software. You have an abundance of choices.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 7:49 AM   in reply to Rob Cole

    Rob Cole wrote:

     

     

    But if you want the full advantage that DRO offers, in Lightroom, then turn it on when it's appropriate, off when appropriate, and compensate in Lightroom

    As far as I can tell, the "full advantage" that DRO (and similar) offers, is functionally identical in the context of LR Raw development with what we get by carrying out normal exposure compensation (with the feature turned off). With the latter method, we do at least avoid building an extra, invisble, systematic, Raw vs JPG offset into what the camera histograms, blinkies etc are telling us about the metering of the scene - as well as, telling the auto exposure function of the camera.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 7:56 AM   in reply to HAHPHAEK

    HAHPHAEK wrote:

     

    I have been a user of LR since its first version and had not encounter this problem until recent.

     

    I would think if this is the phenomenon everybody thinks it is, that you would have noticed it long ago.

     

     

    HAHPHAEK wrote:

     

    In my case, it is applying some color tone and vignetting, it is not helping the look of the image at all.

     

    Are you saying there are actual (non-zero) vignette/color setting being applied, or you are just noticing a difference in vignetting and color/tone, but no non-zero settings have been applied.

     

     

    Perhaps an example? (I've not noticed anything inexplicable...)

     

     

    Rob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 8:07 AM   in reply to richardplondon

    If the camera does meter-based optimization of exposure, it must be 'On' in camera (to benefit). I don't know about Sony's DRO.

     

    In the case of Nikon's ADL, the exposure optimization is not fixed (it's dynamic: based on measurement of reflected light), so there is value in using it regardless of raw converter / post-processor.

     

    Normal exposure compensation just adds a fixed offset to what the camera thinks is reasonable exposure, but ADL is adding some "expose to the left" on top of that, to try to protect highlights. Otherwise, reasonable exposure means expose more to the right.

     

    Does that not sound right? Or not make sense??

     

    Rob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 9:22 AM   in reply to Rob Cole

    Rob Cole wrote:

     

     

    Normal exposure compensation just adds a fixed offset to what the camera thinks is reasonable exposure, but ADL is adding some "expose to the left" on top of that, to try to protect highlights. Otherwise, reasonable exposure means expose more to the right.

     

    Does that not sound right? Or not make sense??

    I think this is all getting a little OT for this particular thread, for which I apologise. I take no issue with what you say. If ADL/ DRO is doing something specifically clever with the metering, on a shot by shot basis, then yes that may be an extra convenience benefit. However, we should balance that against some possible extra inconvenience once we come into LR... for example, if the needed exposure boost becomes awkwardly large. LR cannot lift exposure linearly, so is IMO less appropriate for deliberate exposure offset techniques (e.g., so-called "ISOless" working) than some other converters are.

     

    I'll just add that certain cameras are already doing their best to protect highlights shot-by-shot when metering in Matrix (Pattern, super-E-Z-psychic, whatever) mode - or if not, that is what the camera operator is there for (grin). I'll fully stand ready to be corrected about ADL and/or DRO, if it emerges that LR can make use of the resulting Raw file in any different way, leaving aside how this has affected the absolute exposure - and all which follows from that.

     

    regards, RP

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 10:41 AM   in reply to ninjapimp

    It is advisable to create a custom camera profile.

    Nonetheless, go to the Develop Module and under Camera Calibration choose "Camera Neutral" instead of the Adobe Standard or any other you might have in there. In most cases, this will return some of the adjustments made to the large previews of your RAW files and help maintain the same appearance of your image when you first saw it. Try it to see if it helps.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 10:53 AM   in reply to Herrera Héctor Armando

    What reason is there to do anything but ignore the camera preview once the photo is imported into LR?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 1:50 PM   in reply to richardplondon

    I definitely can see some merit in leaving it off all the time, especially if you primarily use Lr/ACR for post-processing. Probably better than leaving it on all the time, which is what a lot of people do until they learn to leave it off all the time . IMO, it should be a camera control instead of a menu option so it could be more easily toggled per scene. But, it's not... - definitely something to be said for simplifying shooting, and reducing the number of things to worry about before triggering the shutter - that's one of the great things about shooting raw anyway - you don't have to think about camera controls that are getting baked in. Cheers, Rob.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 2:16 PM   in reply to Rob Cole

    Just set your camera to Adobe RGB, and turn the contrast way down (in Camera) and your JPEGs will then look like your Raws and you won't stay up late at night worrying about it.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 17, 2012 2:24 PM   in reply to Rikk Flohr

    I always shoot with a modified neutral style - reduced contrast and enhanced saturation. I want to be able to see what tonal detail there is to work with, and what colors are present, not to make a result that looks good out of camera. Added bonus: my images usually look a lot better after Lr's default processing .

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 29, 2012 8:39 PM   in reply to ninjapimp

    I have been experiencing the same issue.  I understand the posts and what it is doing.  I have a custom picture profile setup to my liking and wish this would transfer over as the default and "starting point" when importing in Lightroom.  Since we relly on our cameras in the field and are able to preview the image before ever getting back to the computer, it would be nice for lightroom to use the way it came out of the camera as its rendition of the RAW material.  I am going to have to just try and make a new camera profile setup in Lightroom that matches my current camera configuration to more closely match the preview image on the camera that I am seeing on location.  I am guessing when you use Lightroom, it does no good to setup camera profiles on the camera end if it is not exactly matched when importing into Lightroom. 

    I recently purchased the D800 body and have noticed the most dramatic differences with this body in the default Lightroom configuration.  Much more so then my 700 body.

    Nothing is wrong with your Lightroom, it is just the way it is.  Adobe wish list - make Lightroom use my camera picture profile as its default starting point or atleast give me the option to do so without having to try and fine tune a user camera profile setting.

     
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