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ohwell1234
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Which File Format works best in Premiere?

Sep 18, 2012 9:44 AM

I am new to Premiere and am trying it out to see if it is the best tool to edit my old VOB files copied down from a DVD player a couple of years ago. I have tried converting them to MPEG4 but the playback quality deteriorates. I can load the VOB files directly but there is a definite quality deterioration issue.

 

Should I first convert the files to something else? Say AVI?

 

Many thanks

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2012 10:23 AM   in reply to ohwell1234

    You can load the DVD files as is into a project, if, when you start your project, you set the project up for Hard Disk Camcorder Standard Definition video.

     

    You'll need to render often as you work. (Press Enter whenever your see red lines above your clips on the timeline.) But your results should be virtually as good as the original.

     

    If you know what you're doing, you can try converting the VOBs to DV files -- but they MUST be true DV files. Not any AVI or MOV files will do. Then you can use the standard DV project set-up and you won't need to render your work so often.

     
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    Sep 18, 2012 10:55 AM   in reply to ohwell1234

    Since you are new, I will ask... do you know that a VOB has had "about" 2/3 (give or take) of the original information removed?

     

    DV AVI is about 13Gig per hour of video... for that 13gig (or more) of video to fit on a 4+Gig DVD, the original video is HIGHLY compressed, which means much of the original information is gone forever

     

    Converting back to a more easily edited format is a compromise... do as Steve says, and edit your VOB

     

    More on editing a compressed file http://tangentsoft.net/video/mpeg/edit.html

     

    And specific to VOB

    Read Bill Hunt on editing a VOB/MPG file http://forums.adobe.com/thread/464549

    Edit Vob http://premierepro.wikia.com/wiki/FAQ:How_do_I_import_VOB_files_/_edit _a_DVD%3F

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2012 12:35 PM   in reply to ohwell1234

    As has been mentioned, the MPEG-2 DVD files, wrapped into the VOB "containers, have already been highly-compressed. That is the nature of a DVD-Video. Nothing can be done to undo that compression, and return any of the quality.

     

    PrE will let you Import the VOB files,* and edit them natively. However, if you are then going to Export/Share to a compressed format, say out to an edited DVD-Video, then there WILL be additional compression, and a loss in data.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     

    * PrE will Import and edit VOB's, that are 100% DVD-compatible. However, if they are NOT 100% DVD-compatible, then the only recourse is to rip/convert the MPEG-2 DVD files in the VOB's, to Import and edit. In that case, I would recommend DV-AVI Type II files w/ 48KHz 16-bit PCM/WAV Audio, using the MS DV/DVC CODEC.

     

    Unfortunately, most DVR machines, and a lot of DVD-Video authoring software, do NOT produce 100% DVD-compliant files, and usually the first VOB (contains Menus and navigation, plus the first part of the MPEG-2 DVD file, that can span several VOB's) will NOT Import properly, while the second, plus any more, will usually work fine. It might be that you will only have to rip/convert the first VOB, but some software just does a bad job of authoring, so one would have to rip/convert all VOB's.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2012 2:08 PM   in reply to ohwell1234

    >copied from tapes to my old DVD hard-drive

     

    A hard drive and a DVD are not at all the same... so please provide details about what you did

     

    The best way to be able to edit is by using a product from http://www.grassvalley.com/products/converters

     

    The ADVC55 is one way from tape to computer, the model 110 (more $) is two way so you may write back to tape

     

    Both the 55 and 110 will convert your analog tapes to digital format... DV AVI type 2 which is at good as it gets for editing SD video

     

    Added

    By "DVD hard-drive" do you mean a non-computer DVD recorder?

     

    If you played your tapes into a "box" with a hard drive and a DVD writer, go back and read what Hunt had to say... your VOB files may not be 100% editable

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 18, 2012 3:13 PM   in reply to ohwell1234

    For digitizing an analog source, this article might be useful: http://forums.adobe.com/thread/615047?tstart=60

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 19, 2012 10:10 AM   in reply to ohwell1234

    >used a DVD player's harddrive to convert

     

    Well, as Hunt said in #3, you may or may not be able to edit those files

     

    If your files do not edit, you will need to convert to a format that will edit

     

    Convert SD (Standard Definition) files to DV-AVI Type II with 48KHz 16-bit Audio

    .

    I have NOT used the products below, I only forward due to other mentions... so YMMV and all the usual disclaimers... check the links and read to find out if one of the products listed below will rip or convert the files you have to something you need for editing

    .

    http://www.corel.com/servlet/Satellite/us/en/Product/1175714228541#tab view=tab0

    http://www.womble.com/products/mvw.html

    http://www.magix.com/us/movie-edit-pro/ plus $5 Ship

    http://www.nchsoftware.com/prism/index.html

    http://www.videoredo.com/en/index.htm

    http://www.daniusoft.com/media-converter-ultimate.html

    http://www.deskshare.com/media-converter.aspx Digital Media Converter

    http://www.any-dvd-ripper.com/any-dvd-ripper-windows.html

    http://www.deskshare.com/dvd-ripping-software.aspx

    http://www.dvdcopysoftware-reviews.com/dvd-cloner/

    http://www.topsoftwareol.com/product/Video/Video_Converter_Standard.ht ml

    http://www.erightsoft.com/SUPER.html Multi-Converter <-- supposed to be very good

    http://download.cnet.com/FreeStar-Free-Video-Converter/3000-2194_4-108 54990.html

    http://www.dvddecrypter.org.uk/ or http://www.mrbass.org/dvdrip/

    http://www.flaskmpeg.net/download.php Mpeg to AVI Converter

    http://www.squared5.com/ MPEG Streamclip Converter

    http://www.virtualdub.org/ Mpeg to AVI Converter

    http://www.sothinkmedia.com/video-converter/

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 19, 2012 10:11 AM   in reply to ohwell1234

    DV-AVI is a particular version of AVI, and uses the standard MS DV/DVC CODEC. It is perfect for such work. The format, AVI, can have any number of CODEC's, so is virtually meaningless, with the qualifier of CODEC used.

     

    Hope that clears things up a bit.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 19, 2012 2:57 PM   in reply to ohwell1234

    Sorry, that page shows as not available.

     

    What CODEC is used in the files from WinFF?

     

    Like I said, and I stand by it, a DV-AVI files is an AVI file, but it is a very specific sub-set of the AVI, in that it uses the MS DV/DVC CODEC. Other AVI files can have almost any CODEC known to man.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 19, 2013 12:45 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Is DV-AVI good with text? Like adding titles? Also is PreE any good with HD footage or would it be better to get Premiere Pro? If it is good with HD footage which one's work best?

     

    Thanks,

     

    Jonathan

     
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    May 19, 2013 10:41 AM   in reply to johnjv24

    They will "work" equally well.  It's just a matter of editing options and workflow.

    You will need more robust hardware and multiple hard drives for Pro.

     

    You can download the trial and see if you want Pro.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 19, 2013 11:34 AM   in reply to Peru Bob

    Okay so DV-AVI will be good enough for text with the video. It is the DV format that

    Is known to not to be gracious to text correct? Will a i5 with hyperthreading be a good enough processor to work with the HD footage in either PreE or PrePro? Besides the ton of  storage space.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 19, 2013 4:52 PM   in reply to johnjv24

    Actually, it is MPEG-2 DVD, which is not kind to Text - and a few others. That MPEG-2 DVD is the required CODEC for a DVD-Video.

     

    DV-AVI is compressed, but by only about 5%. Generally, it is OK with Text, so long as one does not have a lot of generations. When I do have multi-generational files, I will instead use one of the lossless CODEC's, such as Lagarith Lossless, or UT Lossless. They ARE compressed, BUT they are "visually lossless."

     

    Another limitation of the DV-AVI CODEC is that it is ONLY for SD, i.e. 720 x 480 for NTSC. If one has HD material, it will down-rez the output file to SD dimensions, and that will NOT be good for Text, and not ideal for Video, though it IS better than up-rezzing from SD to HD dimensions.

     

    For creating Text in Video, the links in this article might be useful: http://forums.adobe.com/message/3349385#3349385

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 19, 2013 4:55 PM   in reply to johnjv24

    The i5 will easily handle HDV footage, in either version of Premiere, but if you are editing AVCHD, or any other H.264 CODEC material, it will likely be a bit sluggish in playback, and you will want to Render the Timeline often.

     

    The Titles will not matter one way, or the other, but the source footage certainly will.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 19, 2013 7:12 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Alright. I thought I was told before that DV was worse than MPEG2. I could be wrong.

     

    Do you know if the ADVC110 Canopus converter captures analog video to DV-AVI or just simply DV? Are they the same?

    Or excuse my ignorance but is DV-AVI for windows and DV is on Macintosh? (FYI I have a Mac) Or am I just confused ha.

     

    "The i5 will easily handle HDV footage, in either version of Premiere,...."

                                                         ^

    Okay thanks for clearing that up ^

     

    THanks,

     

    Jonathan

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 19, 2013 7:59 PM   in reply to johnjv24

    The Canopus, run through the Capture module in PrE, will result in a DV-AVI, if you set it to do so. Of the other possible Capture formats/CODEC's, the DV-AVI would be the best, and is so very easy to edit.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 20, 2013 2:25 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Awesome! I will definitely get the Canopus product!

     

     

    Finally, since my video editing results in creating a regular DVD for the local tv program for our church, would it

    be best to always convert/capture footage to DV-AVI no matter what format be it AVCHD, MPEG4, or MPEG2, or even other HD formats?

     
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    May 20, 2013 2:38 PM   in reply to johnjv24

    If you are being handed digitized material already, the Canopus will not figure into the workflow.

     

    With SD, or HDV digital material, recorded to miniDV tape, you would Capture directly from the camera, via an IEEE-1394a/FireWire-400 cable.

     

    With digital material, stored on a camera's HDD, or to a flash media card, one would Copy the files (and full folder structure for AVCHD material) to the computer's HDD, then Get/Add Media (depends on PrE version), to Import that material into the Project.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 26, 2013 8:13 PM   in reply to Bill Hunt
     
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    May 27, 2013 8:47 AM   in reply to johnjv24

    If you are on a mac you do not capture to dv-avi but it will be transcoded to .mov (which is the equivalent of dv-avi)

     

    DV-avi is compressed 1:5 compaired to raw dv (digital video): so that will be 20%.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    May 27, 2013 8:47 AM   in reply to Ann Bens

    Ann,

     

    Good point about a Mac, and one worth mentioning.

     

    Thank you,

     

    Hunt

     
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    May 27, 2013 5:52 PM   in reply to Ann Bens

    Oh okay so I will get the same results with mov. video? Like the ease of editing and the kindness to text as the DV format is?

     
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    May 27, 2013 5:57 PM   in reply to johnjv24

    That depends entirely on the CODEC used inside your MOV files. Like AVI (primarily for the PC), there can be many, many CODEC's inside. Many work well, where some do not. As a for instance, you could a MOV file with the AIC (Apple Intermediate CODEC), where you would need to have Apple's Final Cut Pro installed, even to use that file on a Mac.

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jun 8, 2013 12:39 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Alrighty thanks for the info!!!

     

    Does anyone know of a video converting software for windows that is able to import a dvd , avchd &amp; mpeg4 files and convert to dv, dv-avi?

     

    Also any recommendation on a dvd authorizing program that does a better job of burning a dvd then preE 10?

     

    Thanks,

     

    John

     
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