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Best Monitor for Photo editing?

Sep 22, 2012 7:26 AM

I about to invest new 24' monitor but still can't decide which monitor should I get. Can anyone recommend that doesnt break the bank? I'm freelance photographer and most of my work more to portrait and wedding and I only do for part time. Here's my shot list

 

  1. Dell U2412M
  2. HP ZR2440w
  3. Asus PA248Q
  4. Dell U2410
 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2012 8:16 AM   in reply to pharcazell

    The first two are not wide gamut, if that matters to you.

     

    The Asus would seem to be the least expensive of the wide gamut monitors.

     

    The Dell U2410 is a highly respected wide gamut monitor. I like mine and would

    buy it again.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2012 9:52 AM   in reply to pharcazell

    How is this a Lightroom question?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2012 12:14 PM   in reply to Keith_Reeder

    I assume the OP is referring to use of wide gamut monitor with LR, so relevant.

     

    If you are printing to a wide gamut inkjet printer (6 or more inks) than using a wide gamut display will be helpful. For web, screen, and printing to standard CMYK  4-ink printers it won't provide much better color accuracy than an sRGB gamut display. With LR4's Soft Proof feature you can get a very accurate onscreen rendering of what the final print output will look like using the target printer and paper profile.

     

    Wide gamut displays will not render color properly with most web browsers and other non-color managed applications. Because of this I would also suggest using a dual display setup with one sRGB gamut standard display and a wide gamut display.

     

    Also be aware that 10bit/color will provide better rendering of fine gradients on wide gamut displays, but LR currently only supports 8 bit/color display output. Only PS CS4-CS6 support 10bit color display output. You also need to be using a graphics adapter that supports 10/bit color, and one that is compatible with PS.

     

    If you don't fully understand the differences between a wide gamut and standard gamut (sRGB) display I suggest doing some research. Also search this forum and the Web for reviews on displays you are considering. There have been numerous issues with calibrating certain model wide gamut displays.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 22, 2012 8:00 PM   in reply to pharcazell

    More important even than the monitor is that you get a display calibrator. None of those monitors will be correct if you don't calibrate and profile it.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Sep 24, 2012 11:02 PM   in reply to Jao vdL

    Pharcazell,

     

    I own the Dell U2410 and I'm happy with it! Had to return the first one cause of the red/green color cast problem (browse the web for that problem). Dell's service was fast and easy even though I purchased from a re-seller.

     

    I use the monitor together with a spyder 3 and wysiwyg is working with my Epson R2880!

     

    Oli

     
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  • Andrew Rodney
    1,390 posts
    Apr 16, 2009
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 10, 2012 9:51 AM   in reply to trshaner

    trshaner wrote:

    Also be aware that 10bit/color will provide better rendering of fine gradients on wide gamut displays, but LR currently only supports 8 bit/color display output. Only PS CS4-CS6 support 10bit color display output. You also need to be using a graphics adapter that supports 10/bit color, and one that is compatible with PS.

    And Windows OS. No full 10-bit path support on Mac (thanks Apple).

     

    If you don't fully understand the differences between a wide gamut and standard gamut (sRGB) display I suggest doing some research.

    Agreed. Here's a pretty exhaustive video on the subject:

     

    High resolution:http: //digitaldog.net/files/ColorGamut.mov

    Low Res (YouTube): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0bxSD-Xx-Q

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2013 6:16 PM   in reply to trshaner

    With regard to trshaner's comprehensive answer above, is a dual monitor setup really necessary to look at how sRGB images are rendered? If you're soft-proofing anyway, can't you soft-proof using sRGB as the profile rather than your physical output profile?

     

    I think you can but I'm happy to be corrected.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 10, 2013 6:19 PM   in reply to Imagenomad

    Can't edit above post as on iPad but meant to add the question as to whether it's not possible to do that on a wide gamut monitor.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2013 5:38 AM   in reply to Imagenomad

    Yes, you can soft proof to sRGB on a wide gamut monitor. The point of having a secondary "sRGB" monitor is to check how the images look in a non color managed environment. With Lightroom or Photoshop that point is moot.

     

    ---

     

    Although I see this is an old thread revived, I'd like to add something to the original question. In terms of a monitor's usability, the sad state of affairs is that the really important properties of a monitor are never measured, and not part of the official specifications. First among these is panel uniformity. You'd think that was a given, but it's not.

     

    The Dell U2410 and the infamous red/green issue is already mentioned. I got one of those too, and returned it within 24 hours. It still amazes me that they even thought they could get away with it - the thing was essentially an expensive doorstop right out of the box. Dell got an enormous amount of bad press over this, but it wasn't just the 2410, the whole Ultrasharp line was basically a lottery. When pressed, a Dell representative on their forums admitted that they only measured the central spot of the screen, and if that was within spec, they shipped it. (And of course it isn't just Dell, that's only an example. Apple Cinema displays - and presumably iMacs - are reported affected by this too).

     

    The thing is that IPS panels (and wide gamut backlights) are pretty expensive compared to ordinary TN panels to begin with, and the target market is pretty small as it is. So to sell a "reasonably priced" IPS monitor like the U2410, some corners have to be cut. Tight tolerances are first to go. Actually, the panel in the U2410 is the same used by Eizo in their 24" Color Edge models at four times the price.

     

    Which isn't to say that all reasonably priced IPS monitors are bad. Most of them are perfectly fine - it's just that you have to be careful, and if possible try it before you buy. The risk of getting a lemon is definitely there.

     

    So given all that, I would say that wide gamut or standard gamut is way down on the list of priorities. Get a monitor that is basically healthy, that's the main thing. A good standard gamut monitor beats a wide gamut one that turns out to be practically useless.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2013 6:38 AM   in reply to Imagenomad

    beau_nash wrote:

     

    With regard to trshaner's comprehensive answer above, is a dual monitor setup really necessary to look at how sRGB images are rendered? If you're soft-proofing anyway, can't you soft-proof using sRGB as the profile rather than your physical output profile?

     

    I think you can but I'm happy to be corrected.

    I agree 100% with twenty_one. It makes no sense to buy an "inexpensive" wide gamut monitor that has issues for photo editing. It's a case of more (i.e. wide gamut) is not better if you lose color accuracy.

     

    The reason I suggested two displays (wide + sRGB gamut) is that non-color managed applications will not display properly on a wide gamut monitor:

     

    http://www.gballard.net/photoshop/srgb_wide_gamut.html

     

    You can also use a single (one) monitor that integrates the LUT internally for color calibration purposes, such as this one:

     

    http://www.necdisplay.com/p/desktop-monitors/p241w-bk-sv

     

    All displays that utilize an internal LUT have user-selectable color modes, including a calibrated wide gamut mode and sRGB mode. When working in non-color managed applications like Microsoft Office and Internet Explorer you switch the display's color mode to sRGB. Someday all applications will be color managed, but for now this is the only workaround if you want to use just one (1) display.

     

    NEC and Eizo have the best wide gamut display solutions for this purpose, but they are expensive. If this is outside your budget I agree with twenty_one – A standard sRGB gamut monitor that provides good color accuracy will give you better results with LR and PS than a mediocre wide gamut display.

     

    "Pay your money, but make your choice wisely!"

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 11, 2013 2:47 PM   in reply to trshaner

    Thanks both. A useful discussion.

     
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