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bluzdawg
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Fixing Colors

Oct 18, 2012 2:20 PM

Clips have a color cast on SOME of them - a trail ride though the woods, with bright sunlit sections seeming like normal colors,

 

and the shaded portions seeming to have a bluish cast to them.   At this point, i have achieved some correction using  Image Control

 

Color Balance, and reducing the Blue.  I'm sure I'm doing this the hard way, or totally incorrectly (so far), but all the tutorials and

 

instructional items i've seen so far don't seem to do as much to adjust things.   None of the clips have much in the way of "WHITE" areas

 

so i could approach this from a white balance angle.  I'm sure there's a "right way" or easier way to do this - just not sure where to start.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 18, 2012 3:50 PM   in reply to bluzdawg

    Well if you use the fast color corrector effect you could attempt making changing the white balance that way. Generally if you make the white balance a very light blue it will make the picutre appear much more red.

     

    Would you mind uploading a full res still of the clip you're wanting to fix so me or someone else could see what we can do with it. The other effect I'd recommend trying to use is RGB Curves, this effect offers great flexiblity and is easy to use. It might be as simple as adding some red, and taking away a little blue with this effect.

     
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    Oct 18, 2012 5:55 PM   in reply to bluzdawg

    This is the best I could do without spending a silly amount of time. If you want I can upload my project file with the effects on the footage, so you can open the project up and save my effects as a preset on your system.

     

    Color Corrected  shot v6.jpg

     

    Color Corrected Shot v8.jpg

    These are the best I'm able to do using cs6's built in effects (without spending crazy amounts of time.), if you'd like I can upload the project file so you can use the exact effect combo I used here. I used the Three Color Corrector and RGB curves. Anyways though let me know if you'd like me to upload the project so you can save the effects as a preset.

     
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    Oct 18, 2012 5:58 PM   in reply to bluzdawg

    One vote for unprocessed here. Looks more natural to me. It sort of depends on the enviroment and time of day. Both samples that you show are workable, you just want to be consistant from shot to shot. use you vectrascope and make sure that it doesn't rotate from clip to clip.

     
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    Oct 18, 2012 6:02 PM   in reply to ComputerNovice25

    ComputerNovice25 wrote:

     

    This is the best I could do without spending a silly amount of time. If you want I can upload my project file with the effects on the footage, so you can open the project up and save my effects as a preset on your system.

     

    Color Corrected  shot v6.jpg

     

    Color Corrected Shot v8.jpg

    These are the best I'm able to do using cs6's built in effects (without spending crazy amounts of time.), if you'd like I can upload the project file so you can use the exact effect combo I used here. I used the Three Color Corrector and RGB curves. Anyways though let me know if you'd like me to upload the project so you can save the effects as a preset.

    Looks a bit too red\yellow for me.

     

    Looking through the trees to the highlights, I think that should appear more white, not colorized.

     
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    Oct 18, 2012 6:33 PM   in reply to wfmc staffer

    I agree, however it's the best I can do in less than 5 mintues. Plus it's much closer to matching the shot he said he liked the look of than it was originally. However I do agree it doesn't look very natural, generally whenever you have to change a shot that much to make it something it's totally not to begin with it doesn't ever look natural again. People always see colors much different than each other though, some people naturally prefer more reds and other people prefer more blues. I've always prefered warmer looks over cooler. However it really depends on the scenario.  The bottom line though is either the OP will have to not use the shots back to back, if he choses to leave them uncorrected or not use one set of shots all together and sometimes that isn't a option.

     

    However I do think his original shot looks WAY too blue. So I wouldn't recommend using the untouched shot. Plus it would make it hard to be able to use the OP's other shots since they are so different.

     

    Here is a different version I'm a bit happier with. I think it also matches your shot a little better.

    However now I have to go watch football.

    Color Corrected Shot v11.jpg

     
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    Oct 18, 2012 7:18 PM   in reply to bluzdawg

    Lynda.com has some good tutorials about reading scopes etc. However you have to pay for a membership there. Honestly though if you really want to get with Premiere I'd highly recommend buying a membership there. They have tutorials for all the other adobe software too. Lots of them and their all good tutorials too. If you google understanding vector scopes you'll find plenty of useful information.

     

     

    Anyways though here is the link for the project and images from the project for 2nd pic I cc'd. 

    http://www.adrive.com/public/rtN7Xy/Color%20Correction%20Project%20Act ual%20Shot%20Number%202.zip

     

    Here is the link for the 3rd one I uploaded incase you decide you'd like to look at that one as well.

    http://www.adrive.com/public/Ky3ePy/Color%20Correction%20Project%20Act ual%20Shot%20Number%203.zip

     

    I used premiere's project manager so that you can just have the entire project. Anyways good luck man.

     
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    Oct 19, 2012 12:18 PM   in reply to bluzdawg

    bluzdawg wrote:

     

    Clips have a color cast on SOME of them - a trail ride though the woods, with bright sunlit sections seeming like normal colors,

     

    and the shaded portions seeming to have a bluish cast to them.

     

    This is actually what happens in nature. Indeed, realizing this (among other things) is what spawned the Impressionist school of painting.

     

    We humans don't normally notice this unless we look for it. Cameras aren't so lucky; they certainly see it, as you attest. This is because the human visual system has a killer "automatic white balance" capability the likes of which camera hardware can only dream of.

     

    What you have to do with the video footage is to color correct it. This normally takes place in two steps. First, correct black and white points and set your overall contrast. A useful tool for doing this is the YC Waveform monitor. A number of color correction effects let you make these corrections. Anything from luma curves to the fast color corrector, three way color corrector, RGB curves, etc. Pick your favorite tool and neaten up the luminance part of the image.

     

    Then, correct out the color cast the camera was seeing. The easist effect to use for this is perhaps the fast color corrector. The tools to use to see it are the vector scope and the RGB parade.

     

    There's an Adrew Devis tutorial on using the fast color corrector in PPro CS6 over on Creative Cow. I highly recommend Devis' tutorials.

     
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    Oct 19, 2012 3:54 PM   in reply to bluzdawg

    Horse2 is the one that has the effects you'll need to use, if you save the effects from that clip you'll get the look you're wanting. I used RGB curves and Fast color corrector. Truthfully I just forgot to delete the v10 and v11 images out of the project they have no real helpful information for you to look at. Horse shot 2 is the one whose effects you want to pay attention to. If this is still confusing to follow I can upload a different project that has only has the needed items inside of it. I should have deleted all the stuff that wasn't necessary before uploading I apologize. Anyways if you want me to upload the project with nothing inside of it besides the horse2 shot with the effects I used on it, then let me know and I can do so. But if you click on the horse 2 image that is in the timeline then look at the "effect controls" panel you'll see the exact effects I used along with the stuff adjusted by looking at the effects.  Then if you want to create a preset you simply hold ctrl and click on the effects then right click on the one of the highlighted effects and click "save preset", then if you look inside your effects bin under "presets" you'll see the saved preset.

     

    LOL sorry I meant to say if you want to get better at reading scopes and more confortable with using Premiere Pro in general I'd really recommend purchasing a membership at lynda.com.  I was watching football while posting so I wasn't really paying full attention to what I was typing.   Very sorry, basically I was trying to say they have tutorials for a lot more than just Premiere pro, they also have tutorials for AE, photoshop and MANY more adobe products. Along with several other companys products.

     
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    Oct 20, 2012 9:25 AM   in reply to bluzdawg

     

    bluzdawg wrote:

     

    cfg_2451 -  I was having a difficult time correcting black and white, since it was difficult to find those "colors" in my clips - and as I told novice25, I found the RGB curves easy to work with, and after doing several clips, I think I've found a stride in it, using pretty much the same "bend" in each clip (it seems the "adjustment-required" clips alternate with the others), and am now in the process of stabilizing (riding horses makes for a pretty shaky footage).

    If it works for you then it works for you. I like to adjust black and white points with luma correction tools simply because they take color out of the equation and work specifically with the luma information. I find it easier. Clearly, YMMV. Either way, do learn to use a YC Waveform monitor. Makes black and white point selection easy, and also contrast matching between clips easier than just eyeballing it. A very useful tool to master.

    bluzdawg wrote:

     

    I'm still not up to speed on the vectorscope and RGB parade, but will review the A Davis tut you mentioned. 

     

    If you're interested in a more in detph (the "why" as opposed to only the "how") you might want to pick up a copy of Van Hurkman's Color Correction Handbook. Excellent example of what any technical book should be. Very readable, and it'll answer questions you don't know enough to ask yet. And that's the best kind of book IMHO.

     
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