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Acrobat 9 Typewriter increasing file size

Oct 24, 2012 10:29 AM

Tags: #typewriter_tool #file_size #typewriter #acrobat_9

I have scanned forms that I need to edit with the Typewriter tool in Acrobat 9 Pro - basically I just need to add a date to the form and then e-mail it.  Evidently I have accidentally clicked some box that I did not want to click, because now when I edit the one-page form (about 70k before editing) and type in any data whatsoever using the Typewriter tool, then save the form, the file balloons to anywhere from 0.6 to 0.9 MB.  Which is crazy, and too large for me to submit.

 

Right now what I'm having to do is edit the form, save it, print it, and re-scan it.  This is making me nuts.  Does anyone have any suggestions?

 

I have tried Reduce File Size, the Optimizer, and downsampling, but nothing has worked.  I can't make the file small enough to make a difference.

 

Thanks,

Beth

 
Replies
  • George Johnson
    11,671 posts
    Aug 11, 2002
    Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 24, 2012 11:04 AM   in reply to windowshop_11

    Do you know what font is being used for the typewriter text?

     
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  • George Johnson
    11,671 posts
    Aug 11, 2002
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    Oct 24, 2012 12:00 PM   in reply to windowshop_11

    The first thing I would do is use "PDF Optimizer > Audit space usage" for the before and after files and compare. This should give you some clues as to what's taking up all the space.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Oct 24, 2012 12:59 PM   in reply to windowshop_11

    Times Roman and Times New Roman are actually two different fonts, both look similar but Times New Roman is an updated version of Times Roman that was drawn for the London Times.

     

    I would advise you use a standard font (courier etc.), that should help with filesize.

     
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  • George Johnson
    11,671 posts
    Aug 11, 2002
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    Oct 24, 2012 12:59 PM   in reply to windowshop_11

    It's good to know you resolved this. The same thing happens with form fields. When you use one of the non-base-14 fonts (Times, Helvetica, Courier, etc.) that are guaranteed to be available with a compliant PDF viewer, the entire font gets embedded in the file so that all of the characters are later available for editing if the file is transferred to a system without the font. Even when you change the fonts in all of the fields/comments to a base-14 font and Save As or otherwise optimize, all of the old font data is not removed for some reason.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 9:40 AM   in reply to George Johnson

    The comment on "standard fonts" is not helpful.  I would say Times New Roman and Arial are standard fonts, since they come with Windows computers as a default.  But both of these fonts cause file size dysfunction with the typewriter tool. I believe Times Roman and Helvetica are very expensive to go out and buy.  I solved the problem with SourceSans Pro that can be downloaded free from Adobe. 

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 13, 2013 5:10 PM   in reply to grapefruit834
    Base - 14 fonts
    Standard Type 1 Fonts (Standard 14 Fonts)

    Fourteen typefaces—known as the standard 14 fontshave a special significance in PDF documents:

    These fonts are sometimes called the base fourteen fonts.[34] These fonts, or suitable substitute fonts with the same metrics, must always be available in all PDF readers and so need not be embedded in a PDF.[35] PDF viewers must know about the metrics of these fonts. Other fonts may be substituted if they are not embedded in a PDF.

    Helvetica was developed in 1957 by Linotype. Arial was Monotype's attempt to make a font that looked like Helvetica (but without paying licensing fees) and was designed in 1982.

    Microsoft didn't want to pay Linotype licensing fees to use Helvetica so it went instead with the cheaper Arial.

    Arial is held in disregard by many professional typographers and type enthusiasts, for reasons relating to its similarity to other typefaces and the involvement of Microsoft in its development and distribution.[7] It is reinforced by Arial's apparent status as a de facto Helvetica stand-in, but without paying royalties, or credit, to Helvetica. Arial's glyph widths are nearly identical to those of Helvetica,[7][26] rather than Monotype Grotesque, on which Arial is otherwise based.[7] "But to an experienced designer," writes typographer Mark Simonson, using Arial "was like asking for Jimmy Stewart and getting Rich Little."

     
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    Mar 14, 2013 8:04 AM   in reply to Bo LeBeau

    Thanks. This is very helpful. I thought that in Acrobat 9 typewriter mode I only had access to my Windows fonts, but on looking more carefully, I found that at the very top of the font list the five fonts listed above are visible. 

     

    Next question - can I get these into my Windows system?  These fonts are not in the regular Fonts location in Windows, and I can't find them in the Adobe folder in Program Files (x86).

     

    Thanks

     
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    Mar 14, 2013 8:37 AM   in reply to grapefruit834

    They are standard PDF fonts, and just work (in PDF). There is no need for them to be in your system.

     
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