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Newbie question - alternating scenes in program sequence using one audio track?

Nov 24, 2012 5:10 PM

Hello,

 

I filmed a school musical on 2 different nights.  Stage left the opening night, and stage right on the last night.  All I want to do is use stage left as my primary video and audio track, then switch to footage from stage right as needed. 

 

Stage left is clearly the better audio track because I was closer to the piano.  However, at times, stage right has a better POV due to the action on the stage, props, etc.  They kinda sped through the last night too so I have some audio syncing challenges when using the stage right footage. 

 

Anyways, here is where I am lost.  Is this a Multi-cam task?  Or do I use the Video 1 & Video 2 track, if so, how?  Or do I need to cut the stage left and stage right scenes independently and assemble it all in order on video 1?

 

I am without the PP6 terminology to locate this answer in the help section, but did learn other great things while looking .  I have CS6 and am a former Pinnacle Studio loser, er, I mean user. 

 

Please point me to the commands/features I need to learn to accomplish this task.  Thanks in advance for your help.

 

JM

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2012 5:15 AM   in reply to INTYME1985

    Oh, I've tried this.  Definitely **not** a multicam project (unless you really want to tear your hair out!). 

     

    Since the timing is different on the two nights I would recommend setting up both performances in their own, separate, sequences.  The stage left will be your primary, finished, sequence and you may as well set the stage right video and audio to be on track 2 (you'll need that audio for reference and you may even have to use it sometimes).

     

    Go through the stage-left performance and split the video at any points you *know* you'll want to use the other camera angle.  Start with the "must-use" scenes and then go on to the "would like to use" scenes - you'll need the practice!

     

    Disable the stage-left clips you won't be using (or drop the opacity to 0%).  You should leave them in place, however, for reference.  Find the corresponding scene on the stage-right sequence.  Cut it and paste it onto track 2 of the same scene in the stage-left sequence (bring the audio along for the ride too). 

     

    Here's where the "editing magic" (read: insanity) comes in.  Finessse the in and out points of each camera (you'll end up adjusting both of them) until you like the cut.  Sometimes the stage-right clip will be longer than the same scene on the stage-left camera.  Sometimes it will be shorter.  Cut your master timeline as needed; if the new stage-right is longer, just lop off the stage-left scene.  If it's shorter, leave a gap or drag the hidden scene out a bit.  The idea is to keep everything as "in sync" as possible to the very end.

     

    You will quickly learn when you can (and can not) cut songs!  This all depends on your particular performers but it will become rapidly apparent!  You will also notice little (sometimes not-so-subtle) changes in costume, hair and make-up, not to mention lighting and set decoration.  Sometimes you can get around these.  Sometimes you have to sacrifice your editing to hide them.  If you are very, very lucky you will have shot this in very high HD.  If so, feel free to re-frame your shots (i.e. zoom in and/or pan).  Then out put the whole thing on a standard def DVD and it will look wonderful!

     

    Oh yeah.. one more thing... the *next* time you do this (and if you do it successfully this time there *will* be a next time!), shoot it in high-def and beg,  borrow or steal a second camera.  Set the second camera up at the back of the house (or somewhere it can see the whole show).  Then you can be free to actually follow the action with your primary camera safe in the knowledge that there's a static "insurance" shot that you will be able to sync up.  *That* will be a multicam edit!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2012 9:19 AM   in reply to INTYME1985

    There will be another play in the spring.

     

    My recommendation would be to buy, rent or borrow a second camera for future productions.  I've done the two night multicut once, and will never do it again.  It's an absolute nightmare to cut.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2012 11:18 AM   in reply to INTYME1985

    INTYME1985 wrote:

     

    Looks like the first step will be syncing the audio from the two nights, then switching the camera angles as needed with the opacity tool. I need to better understand how to use and apply the I/O points as well.


    I don't think you're going to be able to sync the audio.  Even the pros sing slightly differently each night

     

    What I was suggesting is to mark your cut aways by razor blading through the stage-left footage and dropping the opacity to 0%.  Then you can bring your second camera in and sync the action as best as you can. 

     

    You really won't have to use I/O points if you do everything with the blade tool in the sequence.  It should be a little easier and more "organic" that way because you'll be able to see if the second camera is a bit off and just drag its clip around.

     

    The blade and the ripple edit (which is the default action with the "v" key selected) should get you most of the way there.  You migth want to twirl down both audio tracks so you can see the waveforms.  Then you'll know how far off you are!  If needed, you can cut pauses out when you switch camera angles.

     

    It's a good idea to start with just one musical number (make it a duet - not a full chorus piece!) and get the hang of the technique.  It *is* possible to do a good job but Jim is right, it isn't easy!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2012 2:05 PM   in reply to INTYME1985

    Set the 2nd camera up in middle shot and lock it off on tripod

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 25, 2012 2:08 PM   in reply to INTYME1985

    I do the same as above.  Both cameras center back.  One locked off on a wide, one operated and zoom/framed as necessary.

     

    If the client wants closer to the stage angles, that costs extra, so the money is there for freelancers.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2012 4:12 AM   in reply to INTYME1985

    Yeah... what frantyl and Jim said!

     

    I did a four camera shoot of theater in the round last year all by myself!  Three lock downs and me on a monopod.  Worked out great.  I shot in 1080 and output the finished as standard def.  Reframed every single shot zoomed up to about 135% with some digital pans on the lock downs.

     

    Do they really expect yours to be Blu-ray?  It would look so much better standard def.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2012 5:05 AM   in reply to INTYME1985

    I like the Canon range a lot.  We use Vixias at my University and I have a couple at home too.

     

    Although all of my shooting is HD and I put HD up on the web, I still make SD DVDs for a variety of reasons. For one,  I'm on a Mac and Apple isn't exactly Blu-ray friendly.  But more than that, Blu-ray discs look just like SD discs and a **lot** of people still don't have Blu-ray players or will try to look at the disc on a computer without a Blu-ray player.  Of course, I had the same problem "in the day" when DVDs came out and people tried to play them on CD players!

     

    Mainly, though, it's just that standard def is **far** more forgiving and allows a lot of re-framing in post.  At the very least, shoot 1080 and output 720.  That will still give you some leeway for re-framing.  Can't do the math this early in the morning but I'd say you'd be safe to zoom into around 115% before there would be any difference and up to 125% if you can live with a little softness.

     

    Be sure to label the disc as "Blu-ray" so you'll have a standard line to tell people if they can't play it!  Personally, I can't stand any discs and I can't wait until everything is just a computer file!  But of course, they pose problems of their own.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2012 8:59 AM   in reply to Allynn Wilkinson

    Do they really expect yours to be Blu-ray?  It would look so much better standard def.

     

    Huh?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 26, 2012 9:02 AM   in reply to Allynn Wilkinson
    Be sure to label the disc as "Blu-ray"

     

    Or better yet, put it in a Blu-ray case instead of a DVD case.  (And even then, only give that out to folks who want the Blu-ray version.)

     
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