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bsward774
Currently Being Moderated

Can anyone help me cut a word into an image?

Nov 30, 2012 8:26 PM

I believe it is called merge?? I am new to illustrator and am working on learning new tricks,  I have come to a road block here.  

 

Here is a set up:

 

I have font image with a tail connected to the font,  Inside the tail i have another font that i want to weld, merge or whatever you call it so that when i remove the letters it is for say burnt into the tail so when i print it there will be no color.  ( I am screen printing t shirts)    see image for more details    basicly I want to screen print the image below in black, and keep the cafe hollow so it will take on the color of the shirt. 

 

Thank you in advanced

 

 

 

 

 

charlies.jpg

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 30, 2012 9:26 PM   in reply to bsward774

    The simplest way is to make an opacity mask

     

    1 select both text objects (Charlies and Cafe)

     

    2 Go to the Transparency Panel and Click on Make Mask buttton in CS6 in other version select Make Opacity Mask from the flyout menu.

     

    3 uncheck clip and check invert (that's because Cafe is white which is the masking object)(if Cafe were black you would not invert)

     

    That's it.

     

    Screen Shot 2012-12-01 at 12.20.01 AM.png

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 30, 2012 9:32 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    BTW if the letters in Cafe are outlined then you have to select all the letters and go to Object>COmpound Path>Make before performing any of the steps above.

     

    You make the compund path if it is live text it is not necessary to make the compund path. (Unless it alredy is a compund path You will know that by looking in the layers panel.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Nov 30, 2012 9:36 PM   in reply to bsward774

    Another way is if the letters are outlined and are a compound and Chalies is also outlined is selected both of them and using the Pathfinder Panel hit the second top icon from the left. That is minus front.

     

    You get this again.

     

    Screen Shot 2012-12-01 at 12.36.30 AM.png

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 2:18 AM   in reply to bsward774

    Bear in mind that process white (0% in all colours) means no ink.

    So if you print your design on a yellow shirt those white letters will be yellow.

    In other words you don’t really need to do anything.

    It’s just as if you were printing on your office printer using yellow paper,

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 6:53 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    In the past people using Illustrator for screen printing have indicated that leaving it white did not work for them. So they have asked for techniques like minus front or opacity mask.

     

    Sometimes white use to seem to get set to overprint. Which would case a problem for the underlying black.

     

    So these techniques assures there is no problem for a novice and the techniques will come in handy for other similar situations.

     

    I thought explaining overprint and knockout might be more difficult for the user at this point in time.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 7:35 AM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    No harm in explaining Minus Front, but all the same, it should be quite all right to leave white as white in a simple job like this.

    All the user has to do is to turn on Overprint Preview to check that the white isn’t set to overprint.

    If it is, it’s easy to de-check Overprint Fill in the Attributes panel.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 8:39 AM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    steve fairbairn wrote:

     

    No harm in explaining Minus Front, but all the same, it should be quite all right to leave white as white in a simple job like this.

    All the user has to do is to turn on Overprint Preview to check that the white isn’t set to overprint.

    If it is, it’s easy to de-check Overprint Fill in the Attributes panel.

    You would think so? I wonder if you do not know wht overprint is and if you do not undersand the difference between ovrprint and knock out and have know experience is this something as easy as you say it is?

     

    You certainly did not even mention the overprint white possibility in your first post so it would seem to me it is not something even an expereince person would consider.

     

    How may times has this very issue showed up on this form? 100? 200? 300?

     

    So since the users is working with screenprinting and may need to use either opcaity masks or a minus front or some other tool in the pathfinder this would be something they should know and use. Also keep in mind at some point in time they might want to use the art again in such a way that they will need the opacity mask or the version created by the use of minus front.

     

    Much better to have it available.

     

    I thought about this csrefully before forging ahead with a simplistic answer that might not be the best solution for the user.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 9:54 AM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    Since process white overprint became a (nonsensical) possibility and due to many expensive mistakes caused by it, it should now be now part of a designer’s routine to take a look at the Overprint Preview before sending to press.

     

    I think there is nothing simplistic about my suggestion in post #4 and rather resent your implication.

    It’s just that some people seem to think that compound paths are a necessity for producing non printing areas as in the OP’s example.

     

    What you see on your screen is not what you get if you are printing on a coloured substrate.

    It’s really rather obvious if you think in terms of separation films and yet I have seen a number of posts where people have been racking their brains how to solve a problem that wasn’t a problem at all.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 12:28 PM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    Oh you selct the objects and hit a button and make an opacity mask, And you don't have to worry about it.

     

    Or you select the two object and you hit minus front and again you don't have to wrry about it.

     

    And

     

    Since process white overprint became a (nonsensical) possibility and due to many expensive mistakes caused by it, it should now be now part of a designer’s routine to take a look at the Overprint Preview before sending to press.

    Yes if you are exxpereince and know this, the user is not experienced so we should give them a break and figure they won't even be aware of this as most expereince professional users are not aware of this problem.

     

    We have to come down to earth and help not hinder!

     

    I mean someone pointed this problem out to you as they did to me.

     

    And I write it again they may need to use the cut out version as they call it for other application in the future they might as well not have to think about it again. It is a better way when screen printing.

     

    Offset would be a different story.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 12:29 PM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    I am new to illustrator

    I quote the OP they would never know what happened if the white were set to overprint!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 4:00 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    Wade: I still think you are making mountains out of molehills.

     

    Under normal circumstances white on black should print as white on black as long as you are using a white substrate.

    "White" is just the colour of the substrate. It’s even called "paper" in InDesign which is really a much better name for it.

    So if you are printing on a yellow substrate "white" will be yellow.

     

    Offset or screen print, zero % of process colours means no ink, zilch.

    And that’s hardly rocket science.

    The OP is only using one printing colour, so a quick look at either Overprint Preview or Separations should convince him that everything is in order.

     

    Frankly I think we should wait and see whether the OP has seen a glimmer of light on the other side of his road block before we get ourselves into a tizz by hopping up and down too much :-)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 4:14 PM   in reply to Wade_Zimmerman

    In the past people using Illustrator for screen printing have indicated that leaving it white did not work for them.

    Really? Where? When? Show an example of this.

     

    How may times has this very issue [white set to overprint] showed up on this form? 100? 200? 300?

    Oh, puh-leeze.

     

    So what? How many times has a question revealed that the one asking doesn't understand the even more basic principle (that white doesn't print), as evident in this thread, and which Steve correctly explained? That's  the primary misconception at issue here.

     

    You, on the other hand, serve to reinforce the misconception that the white text must actually be a hole in the black by guiding bsward774 through a bunch of completely unnecessary steps.

     

    This thread has nothing whatsoever to do with accidently setting white to overprint. You simply trotted that out in a transparent attempt to defend your own reply, thereby obfuscating the whole subject-- and then lit into Steve with your typical personal insults. Who do you really think you're fooling here, Wade?

     

    And I write it again they may need to use the cut out version as they call it for other application in the future they might as well not have to think about it again.

    Then by your own convoluted "logic" you yourself have committed just as egreggious a travesty by failing to explain to the "poor beginner" the risks inherent in unnecessary use of transparency masks (what you call the "simplest way"): accidental rasterization.

     

    It is a better way when screen printing.

     

    Okay. How so? Explain yourself.

     

    The "simplest way" as you put it, is to simply leave the white text alone, as Steve correctly and appropriately explained.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 4:15 PM   in reply to JETalmage

    Thanks for backing me up James.

    I thought I gave a simple solution, not a simplistic one :-)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 4:27 PM   in reply to Steve Fairbairn

    I thought I gave a simple solution...

    You did. In fact, I was about to post the same response, but you beat me to it.

     

    Wade just overlooked the obvious himself, thus his overly defensive over-reaction, after having already posted all those unnecessary "solutions" to a non-existent problem. And he even managed to unwittingly cast doubt on his own familiarity with screen printing to boot.

     

    JET

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 1, 2012 6:55 PM   in reply to JETalmage

    You are mistaken I tthought of it right away but read the OP thread carefully and they are new illustrator and might not understand then they asked to make it a cutout and said it was going to be screen printed  on a tee shirt and it occurred to me they might want to or even have to print the art on top of another element that might not be obvious in the posting.

     

    If you see what I am getting at.

     

    As far as the threads about problems with white set overprinting in cases like this I really do not have an archive as I have no need for it.

     

    I think the OP will be better served by either an opacity mask or applying a minus front and they will also now know how to perform these tasks.

     

    I believe the OP will decide which way serves their purposes and will know if they need to know about creating masks and compound shapes and compund paths.

     
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