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dreamweaver question

Dec 7, 2012 8:49 PM

Yes, I tried to ask my question in the dreamweaver forum, but it wouldn't let me type more (like I'm typing now).... so sorry if I'm in the wrong place.

 

I'm a long time user of InDesign.  My new job has too many tasks that seem to need html  For instance, it doesn't seem to be enough that I know indesign inside and out and design as a whole, now because of the digital world, I need to know how to use html for email campaigns (constant contact I know is an option with templates, but is there another option???), and the like.

 

I'll never be a coder.  I can't seem to get my brain around that.  But, what software is relatively easy to learn how to do some basic html, without having to use or see the code?  Is Dreamweaver the answer?  How long would it take to learn?  It seems if you use it everyday, it's easier but that won't be the case in this instance, so it seems like I need a tutor.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 8, 2012 12:18 AM   in reply to indesigna

    Dreamseaver used to be easier few years ago but nowadays you have to know quite a bit of basics of CSS and html if you want get something usefull out of it.

     

    Maybe you should check out the product named Adobe Muse. It's much easier to use and there is suprisingly lot in common with InDesign, I think there has been same people behind both softwares...

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,134 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 8, 2012 5:49 AM   in reply to indesigna

    I need to know how to use html for email campaigns (constant contact I know is an option with templates, but is there another option???), and the like.

     

    Because there are so many email clients out there all with different capabilities, served bulk emails can very difficult. If you expect the email to display correctly in every email client, you can't use CSS styles or DIV tags —it has to be tables with inline styles. If you're feeling anxious about learning HTML an email service like Constant Contact is the way to go.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 8, 2012 6:52 AM   in reply to indesigna

    indesigna wrote:


    I'll never be a coder.  I can't seem to get my brain around that.  But, what software is relatively easy to learn how to do some basic html, without having to use or see the code?  Is Dreamweaver the answer?  How long would it take to learn?  It seems if you use it everyday, it's easier but that won't be the case in this instance, so it seems like I need a tutor.

    If you're comfortable in ID, take a look at Muse (part of Creative Cloud). I't not as "heavy duty" as Dreamweaver, but you might find it adequate to your needs and the learning curve willnot be as steep.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 15, 2012 4:46 AM   in reply to indesigna

    Ask in the Dreamweaver forum. You'll get way more insight there.

     

    Bob

     
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  • Rob Day
    3,134 posts
    Oct 16, 2007
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 15, 2012 6:58 AM   in reply to indesigna

    With DreamWeaver you have the choice of coding tables or divs, and using inline styles or CSS styles.

    The bulk email services like Constant Contact also serve up the emails for you—when you get an email the images aren't attached, they're coming from a web server. They also provide subscription services for your list—the option to unsubscribe.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 17, 2012 9:44 AM   in reply to indesigna

    ...what program would have tables with inline styles development???

     

    Therein lies  the meat of your immediate problem. Table layouts and inline styles are essentially by-gone conventions for just about everything but email campaigns. You can build tables and add inline styles in Dreamweaver of course, but the more recent versions are much more geared toward CSS for layout and style declaration.

     

    For email-bound layouts in particular, Muse would be a terrible choice of tools. It's true that as an accomplished InDesign user, it would be the most comfortable fit for you, but its code output is all wrong for email client rendering, relying heavily on many levels of CSS to turn your no-code input into browser-compatible content.

     

    Rob Day: With DreamWeaver you have the choice of coding tables or divs, and using inline styles or CSS styles.

     

    Yes, and so it is an applicable tool for your task, but no matter what software you use, you'll need to learn some basic HTML coding. You really shouldn't let it intimidate you. It's not a different language or symbol based or anything like that. With the knowledge of 10-15 basic tags, you can easily produce email layouts that will work. A few hours reading and experimenting is all you need.

     
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