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AEP22
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Neutral Overlay Layer Inside a Group Screws Up All the Layers Below It

Dec 12, 2012 11:25 AM

A Group in NORMAL mode containing  a NEUTRAL OVERLAY layer blocks all the layers below and outside the Group with a solid grey color.  Feature or problem?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 3:44 PM   in reply to AEP22

    Hi. Because the forum you originally posted in is for beginners trying to learn the basics of Photoshop, I moved your question to the Photoshop General Discussion forum.

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 4:49 PM   in reply to AEP22

    There's no screw up.

     

    The Group does not have Pass Through mode, therefore its bottom layer's blending mode is irrelevant and that layer will be considered to have Normal mode.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 5:02 PM   in reply to AEP22

    My reply did make sense. You failed to make sense of it. The bottom layer to which I referred is the bottom layer inside the group. I constructed the sentence to make that clear; the pronoun it referred to the object the Group.

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 5:19 PM   in reply to AEP22

    OK, you didn't mention more than the gray layer being inside the group. The result is still correct. Take the layers out of the group and make only these layers visible. You get a tree surrounded by gray. That's the same as is being evaluated inside the Normal group, and it's then Normal-blended with the field layer below the group.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 5:34 PM   in reply to AEP22

    No, I'm not telling you that.

     

    You said that inside the Normal group is a neutral gray Overlay layer above a layer containing a tree surrounded by absolute transparency. When the content of the group is evaluated, the gray will be blended with absolute transparency to produce the same gray, and the result will be a tree surrounded by gray. That is then Normal-blended with the field layer below the group, which results in the field layer being obscured.

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 6:17 PM   in reply to AEP22

    Clip the Overlay layer to the tree layer if you want it to affect only the tree pixels.

     

    Screen-shot-2012-12-14-at-02.14.43.png

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 6:19 PM   in reply to AEP22

    Another way of saying that the Pass Through blending on layer groups tells photoshop to honor the individual blend modes of each layer in the group.

    But if you set the blending mode of the layer group to something else such as Normal, then photoshop applies that blending mode (normal in your case)

    to all the layers in the group.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 6:31 PM   in reply to R_Kelly

    R_Kelly wrote:

     

    Another way of saying that the Pass Through blending on layer groups tells photoshop to honor the individual blend modes of each layer in the group.

    But if you set the blending mode of the layer group to something else such as Normal, then photoshop applies that blending mode (normal in your case)

    to all the layers in the group.

     

    No, I disagree. When a group's blending mode is other than Pass Through, each layer except for the bottom layer in the group still has its own blending mode honoured. The group's content will be evaluated as if its layers were being merged then that will be blended with layers below the group, according to the group's blending mode.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 6:43 PM   in reply to conroy

    You may be right, but here's the expanation from adobe:

     

     

    Specify a blending mode for a layer or group

    A layer’s blending mode determines how its pixels blend with underlying pixels in the image. You can create a variety of special effects using blending modes.

    By default, the blending mode of a layer group is Pass Through, which means that the group has no blending properties of its own. When you choose a different blending mode for a group, you effectively change the order in which the image components are put together. All of the layers in the group are put together first. The composite group is then treated as a single image and blended with the rest of the image using the selected blending mode. Thus, if you choose a blending mode other than Pass Through for the group, none of the adjustment layers or layer blending modes inside the group will apply to layers outside the group.

     
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    Dec 13, 2012 6:49 PM   in reply to R_Kelly

    The statement agrees with me. When a group isn't Pass Through then the layers inside it are first evaluated to a single image (using the layers' own blending modes) then that image is blended with whatever is below the group (using the group blending mode.)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 6:54 PM   in reply to conroy

    Well you could have explained that instead of saying AEP22 didn't understand what you were saying, heck i couldn't even understand your explanation.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 7:10 PM   in reply to R_Kelly

    R_Kelly wrote:

     

    heck i couldn't even understand your explanation.

     

    I tried to help the OP. So sorry I couldn't please you.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 13, 2012 7:49 PM   in reply to conroy

    Conroy,

     

    I was probably out of line, so i hope you accept my apologies.

     

    R_Kelly

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 14, 2012 4:42 AM   in reply to R_Kelly

    It's no big deal. Don't worry about it.

     
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