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pats52
Currently Being Moderated

Help with Publish+Share Options

Dec 18, 2012 5:50 PM

I am a complete novice with regard to video editing.  I currently have a trial version of Premiere Elements 11 to make sure it can do what I think I want. 

 

My goal is to be able to take HD home video I shoot with the Canon Vixia HFM500 and publish movies to my computer’s hard drive.  From my computer, I plan to play the movies on my HD TV (which can handle full HD) through an HDMI connection while hopefully maintaining the same quality as the original files.  I would like the option of burning the project to a blu-ray at a later date, but that is not my plan right now.

 

The files imported into Premiere for this project are in AVCHD format (1920x1080; 29 fps as specified in the file properties).  I finished putting together all the clips, adding transitions, etc, but am extremely confused trying to figure out which format to select for export under “publish and share". 

 

Do I select MPEG or AVCHD under “Publish+Share ->Computer:Choose location and settings”? 

Depending on which is selected (MPEG or AVCHD), what is the best “Preset” setting for what I want to do... m2t, mp4, 1080i, 1080p, 24 fps, 25fps, 30fps, HDTV???

I expect my videos to be pretty long (~2.5 - 3 hours each)... will I be able to fit each video on a single blu ray?

 

So many options/combinations... so much confusion.

 

Any help is appreciated.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 18, 2012 9:18 PM   in reply to pats52

    Importing Video http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1065281

    -and project settings http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1112086

    Saving & Sharing http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1051093

    Sharing for Computer http://forums.adobe.com/thread/1058237

    Steve's Basic Training Tutorials... steps are the same for several versions

    -http://forums.adobe.com/thread/537685

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 5:15 AM   in reply to John T Smith

    Also, it depends on what software you'll be using the play the video on your computer.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 8:33 AM   in reply to pats52

    Try using Quicktime Player instead. Then you can output a good, high-quality video using Publish & Share/Computer/AVCHD with the preset for MP4 1920x1080 p30?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 9:55 AM   in reply to pats52

    pats52 wrote:

     

    I am a complete novice with regard to video editing.  

     

    • My goal is to be able to take HD home video I shoot with the Canon Vixia HFM500 and publish movies to my computer’s hard drive.
    • From my computer, I plan to play the movies on my HD TV
    • I would like the option of burning the project to a blu-ray at a later date, but that is not my plan right now.
    • The files imported into Premiere for this project are in AVCHD format (1920x1080; 29 fps as specified in the file properties).
    • but am extremely confused trying to figure out which format to select for export under “publish and share". 
    • Depending on which is selected (MPEG or AVCHD), what is the best “Preset” setting for what I want to do...
    • I expect my videos to be pretty long (~2.5 - 3 hours each)... will I be able to fit each video on a single blu ray?

     

    I am less experienced than the people that have given you advice so far.  But, I started with exactly the same goals two years ago with no previous video experience.

     

    • I don't have a Canon.  I have a Panasonic and a Sony.  I suggest you set your camera at the highest quality setting, which I think might be AVCHD 1080p30.  I think it gets a few more lines than MP4 settings.
    • I have played movies from my laptop to a HD TV with a $10 12 foot HDMI cord.  It works very well until you trip over the cord.  My favorite way of viewing videos on a TV is the Western Digital WD TV Live.  It is a very small box similar to the Apple TV or Roku except that it is famous for being able to play nearly every video, graphic and audio file format.  It is usually around $90.  It will, with a nice menu, show your orinial clips along with your finished video. 
    • If you are going to use your computer and and HDMI, I suggest you try the (free) Splash LITE player.  It is quick, smooth and handles AVCHD formats very well.
    • In Premier Elements 11 you can manage files a couple ways.  But, the idea is to keep all your working copies of asset and project files in one folder.  Then you can move the folder to any storage device you choose.  At a later date you can locate the entire folder and make a new output version, like Blu-Ray when you get a burner.  I do the folder management "old school' with Windows explorer, but PrE11 has an "Archive" process that seems to do about the same thing.
    • The files you are importing are probably (and should be for best quality) AVCHD 1080x1929p30.  The "30" is really 29.97 due to a hold over from an old video standard.  The "p" is about full frames instead of the other choice "i" which is sort of like half frames.  I don't think your Cannon will do 60p, but if it does that will be slightly better for clips with fast action in them.
    • I think "Rendering" is made to be confusing.  The first form of it takes place when you start your project.  When you put the first clip on the timeline PrE11 picks a setting that allows it to "render" a preview while you work.  Depending on your computer you may have to help it once in awhile for smooth previewing.  At "Share" time you pick a viewing device and can choose "render" settings.  Ideal for iPhone viewing, YouTube viewing, computer playback and Blu-Ray burning are all different.  In your case, for computer viewing the best choice is to match the original files.  In other words, pick Computer>AVCHD and then find one that says "1080x1920 30p".  The output "render" process takes every frame from your original, adds your transitions, titles and effects and write an entirely new video file with minimal loss.
    • To my knowledge, very few editing systems can render without a little loss of data.  But that is not visually important if you are adding transitions and effects.  The sum is greater than the parts.  And, because PrE11 NEVER changes the original files, you can "Share Render" to optimums for every viewing device.  There are some programs that can join or trim clips with complete lossless results but they don't allow transitions or effects.  They are too "cut and dried" to be any fun.
    • I think the Blu-Ray limit is around four hours for ordinary single layer disks.  Premier Elements 11 can do that.  I think it can even compress a little if it has to.  Until you get a Blu-Ray burner, you may have fun with a derivitive called an "AVCHD disk".  Premier Elements will put up to about 30 minutes of Blu-Ray quality video on an ordinary DVD for playback in a Blu-Ray player. 

     

    Premier Elements 11 is very much the right software for what you want to do.  Growing for years into version 11, every possible thing you might want to do with home video has been added to a menu somewhere in it.

     

    Bill

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 10:31 AM   in reply to whsprague

    >works very well until you trip over the cord

     

    I think the computer corallary is a keyboard usually works very well... until you spill a cup of coffee into the keys

     

    >working copies of asset and project files in one folder

     

    Bill Hunt wrote http://forums.adobe.com/thread/919388?tstart=0 about project setup

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 2:07 PM   in reply to John T Smith

    John T Smith wrote:

     

    >works very well until you trip over the cord

     

    I think the computer corallary is a keyboard usually works very well... until you spill a cup of coffee into the keys

     

    >working copies of asset and project files in one folder

     

    Bill Hunt wrote http://forums.adobe.com/thread/919388?tstart=0 about project setup

    Thanks for that link.  That is almost exactly what I invented on my own.

     

    One difference is that my new computer has a SSD.  Bill suggests speed improvements by spreading the parts out on multiple drives.  With the SSD's speed it seems to work well with even the worst of AVCHD files mixed with huge photo and all when everything is in one folder. 

     

    Bill

     
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