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RichTeer
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Why can't Lightroom 4 catalogues be on network volumes?

Dec 19, 2012 11:57 AM

Tags: #lightroom #problem #catalog #library #4 #volume #network #lr4 #lightroom4

I've just installed a trial version of Lightroom 4.3 on my iMac running OS X 10.8.2. When I first start the application it says it wants to create a new catalog, and I accepted the default location, /home/rich/Pictures/Lightroom. Almost immediately, an error dialog box is displayed, containing the following message: "Lightroom cannot create a catalog named 'Lightroom 4 Catalog" on network volume '/home/rich/Pictures/Lightroom'." Underneath that, in smaller text, is the message, "Lightroom Catalogs can not be opened on network volumes, removable storage, or read only volumes.".

 

I'm a techie (I'm actually a UNIX programmer), so I understand what the message is saying. What I don't understand is WHY it doesn't work. Yes, my home directory is stored on a server, and no, it isn't exported read-only. As a programmer, I don't understand why Lightroom has such a ridiculous restriction: the program should neither know nor care what file system I'm using, or where (in a network sense) it resides. Provided it can access the location in the file system it wants to, it shouldn't care where the bits ultimately end up.

 

As far as I'm concerned this is a bug, and it needs fixing, pronto!

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 12:01 PM   in reply to RichTeer

    This is an as-designed limitation and not a bug by definition:

     

    Further reading for you: http://feedback.photoshop.com/photoshop_family/topics/multi_user_multi _computer

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 2:24 PM   in reply to RichTeer

    RichTeer wrote:

     

    Hi Rikk,

     

    Many thanks for the pointer! After following it (and some of the links in the discussions it points to), I was finally able to work around this design flaw.

     

    For the benefit of others who read this, the answer is to create a volume file using Disk Utility, and store that file on your networked drive. When Lightroom starts up you tell it to create its catalogue on the mounted volume. It works like a charm and performance doesn't seem to be hindered much (if any)--but I should add that I have gigabit Ethernet at home and well-specified machines.

     

    In short: problem solved (not exactly how I'd like it, but good enough)!

     

    Back up your catalog a lot, and keep a lot of the old ones.  What you're doing greatly increases the likelihood of catalog database corruption.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 6:54 PM   in reply to RichTeer

    Because SQLite - the database on which LR is based - requires firmer file locking that is capable over the network.  While the last test was some time ago, the LR engineer for this removed the block on network catalogs and managed to corrupt the catalog beyond his own ability to repair it simply by placing the catalog under heavy stress.

     

    It might work fine.  And it might not.  Since you're computer savy, use caution and make backups if you value the data in the catalog.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 2, 2013 11:28 AM   in reply to RichTeer

    Hello, Rich Teer

     

    Could you please teach me how to create the volume file using Disk Utility ?

      I have no idea how to do that.

     

    Thanks ,

     

     

    André

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 8, 2013 6:04 PM   in reply to Lee Jay

    And how does storing it on a local drive make it safe? This is a major flaw that Adobe needs to address. I have network storage that is all RAID. My hard drives are just that single hard drives. How can any serious photographer use Lightroom? I would never trust my images to be stored on a non-RAID system.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 8, 2013 8:00 PM   in reply to mschore

    If it's that important to you, you should consider Capture One Pro. It allows the catalog to be shared/accessed over a network.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Aug 11, 2013 12:57 PM   in reply to Lee Jay

    H'mm, you mean that Adobe uses Software which is in the public domain.  I actually met the sql lite people and their test programs guarentee that every if statement is tested.

     

    It is rock solid software that is used everwhere.

     

    chip

     
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