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Question Regarding Applying Adjustments Under Keyframing

Dec 19, 2012 1:04 PM

Tags: #adjustments #keyframing

Question Regarding Applying Adjustments Under Keyframing

 

I am in the learning/practicing stage of PE-11. Following along in Steve Grisetti’s book, I’ve been trying to learn about keyframing one’s adjustments.

 

As a learning exercise, I wish to instantaneously increase the gamma --- say, 10 points above normal --- for a length of five seconds of the timeline, then to snap back to normal.  If I use the keyframing technique, my results are that, as the CTI line moves along, the image GRADUALLY lightens to the 10-point increase that I desired, then returns to normal. But for purposes of my test, I don’t want a gradual application of the Adjustment, but an instantaneous change, remaining such for five seconds, then returning to normal.

 

Am I interpreting these results correctly?  Does keyframing by its nature always apply adjustments gradually, or did I do something wrong?  And if I did nothing wrong, then how would one achieve the effect I am looking for, i.e., an instant, not gradual, application of some visual or audio adjustment for merely a few seconds, then return to normal?

 

Thank you,

 

Howard

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 1:18 PM   in reply to Avagadro1

    It sounds like you're coming right along, Howard! (And thanks for supporting the book!)

     

    In fact, you're on the verge of learning a pretty advanced technique: Keyframe interpolation.

     

    See, by default, keyframes gradually change from one setting to another. But you can interpolate them to change abruptly too, as you want to do.

     

    To interpolate a keyframe, right-click on the keyframe point you want to hold your setting on and select, from the right-click menu, Hold. This will keep the settings for that keyframe until you reach the next keyframe -- at which point it will abruptly change to the next keyframe's settings.

     

    Pretty cool, huh?

     

    As you can see, there are a number of interpolations available.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 19, 2012 1:48 PM   in reply to Avagadro1

    That way works too, Howard. But keyframing is the more sophisticated way to do it.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 5:24 AM   in reply to Avagadro1

    No. I don't cover interpolations in my book.

     

    I'm not sure why it's not working. You are right-clicking on the diamond-shaped keyframe, right? Not a round keyframe indicator. And the keyframe is changing to a completely different shape to indicate the interpolation, right?

     

    Can you post a screen capture of your keyframed timeline in the Adjustments panel so I can see it?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 7:28 AM   in reply to Avagadro1

    Howard,

     

    When an Effect Keyframe is created, it is, by default, Linear (no Interpolation), and is displayed as a "diamond." One is limited to changes in Keyframed Effects to 1 Frame, or ~ 1/30th of a sec. for NTSC 29.97. In the image below, I have set the Opacity for a Clip to 100%, and then in the course of 1 Frame, it goes to 0%, and holds for about 05 sec., before it then jumps to 100% in the course of 1 Frame. Look at both the Effects Control Panel's mini-Timeline, and also at the graph of the Keyframes for Opacity, in the Clip, in the main Timeline.

    Keyframe_Linear_Hold.png

    Hope that this helps, and good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 7:44 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Thanks, Bill.

     

    Here's an illustration of a keyframe interpolation in the Adjustments panel. As you can see, the first keyframe has been interpolated to hold its settings until the next keyframe (indicated by its change in shape).

     

    Interpolations.jpg

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 8:34 AM   in reply to Steve Grisetti

    That image should help Howard.

     

    Interpolation is most useful to me, as I seldom want Linear for my Keyframes. I most often use Bezier, or Ease-Out/Ease-In, which is really just a Preset for Bezier, in certain instances.

     

    Now, if one is doing, say music videos, or they desire an "edgy" look, then the abruptness of Linear can be just the ticket. I am normally going for a more "liquid" look, so smooth is what I seek.

     

    I also see that the Effects Control Panel's look has changed a bit - just got my PrE 11 discs, but have not had time to install and explore it yet - maybe after New Year's Day?

     

    Appreciated,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 9:00 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt wrote:

     

    just got my PrE 11 discs, but have not had time to install and explore it yet - maybe after New Year's Day?

     

    Looks like you've only recently got PRE9 (?) Bill - I don't recall having seen a v9 screencap from you before.

     

    Cheers,
    --
    Neale
    Insanity is hereditary, you get it from your children

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 20, 2012 8:48 PM   in reply to Avagadro1

    For a moment, disregard the Hold Keyframe, and look again at my example. It shows an Effect (the Fixed Effect>Opacity) at 100%, and then, within one Frame, that goes to 0% (fully transparent, or invisible), holds that setting for a defined time, and then, within one Frame, goes back to 100%. Notice that the graph of those Keyframes is almost a squared path, which is what you want.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 22, 2012 8:02 AM   in reply to Avagadro1

    Actually, Howard, I never advised against it. I just said that interpolating keyframes is the more advanced method.

     

    Please feel free to slide your clips and apply separate adjustments to each segment if that's easier.

     

    When it comes to video, it's like making babies. We don't care what you had to do to get it -- we just want to see the baby!

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 22, 2012 8:09 AM   in reply to Avagadro1

    Howard,

     

    In my example, there are no Hold Keyframes, just regular, Linear Keyframes. Their placement, and their adjustment will create the "hold."

     

    The GUI changes with most versions of PrE, so the exact Panels, might well look different. However, Keyframes work the same exact way, in each version.

     

    For the Effects Control Panel, if you do not see the mini-timeline, there is a little double-arrow icon (upper-right), that will reveal that to you.

     

    Your method will work, too. In an NLE (Non Linear Editor) program, when one Cuts a Clip, they have not actually altered the original Clip, in any way - it is non-destructive editing. All that has happened is that instructions have been written to the Project file (PREL), telling the program exactly how to proess the data from the original Clip (upon Export/Share/Publish), and what data is required, where, and when. What you see as Cuts, are but representations on the Timeline - sort of a proxy.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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