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cgk92024
Currently Being Moderated

CS5 Color Picker HUD

Dec 30, 2012 1:14 PM

I have PS CS5 (version 12.0.4x32).  The Color PIcker HUD doesn't seem to work (shift-alt-right click).  The Enable OpenGL Drawing box is greyed out and there's a note that PS "Standard" not supported.  What's going on?  Do I have aversion of PS that doesn't support the Color HUD?  How do I find out if I have PS "Standard"  How can I fix this?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 31, 2012 11:42 AM   in reply to cgk92024

    Hi there! Because the forum you originally posted in is for beginners trying to learn the basics of Photoshop, I moved your question to the Photoshop General Discussion forum, where you'll get more specialized help.

     

    To help others help you, please read through this article and provide any additional relevant details.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 31, 2012 12:01 PM   in reply to cgk92024

    It sounds like your GPU doesn't meet the requirements, or isn't working correctly and GPU drawing has been disabled (which includes the HUD).

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 31, 2012 5:25 PM   in reply to Chris Cox

    By the way, when are you going to change the wording of that silly error message, Chris?  I think it was back in Photoshop CS4 we first talked about it. 

     

    -Noel

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Dec 31, 2012 9:53 PM   in reply to Noel Carboni

    I keep asking the people responsible... and it hasn't happened yet.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 2, 2013 8:51 PM   in reply to cgk92024

    The HUD is available in standard and extended.

     

    But you're using a very low end GPU.

    And if the GPU drawing preference is grayed out: either your card isn't capable, or the driver has returned errors when it shouldn't and been disabled.

    And you must have OpenGL drawing enabled to use the HUD (and other GPU features).

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2013 12:52 PM   in reply to cgk92024

    The Intel Graphics Family is not the same as the Intel HD Graphics Family (older vs. newer chips).

    And even some of the HD chips don't have enough VRAM.

    Plus you can still have driver problems forcing the GPU to be disabled.

     

    If it is disabled, there is a reason that it is disabled.

    Until you give us a lot more information (like the GPU info from Help->System Info), we don't know exactly why it is disabled.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2013 3:20 PM   in reply to cgk92024

    Your video driver is out of date, and is returning a bogus number for the VRAM.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2013 4:57 PM   in reply to cgk92024

    Your driver still has a huge problem:  Video Card Memory: -1987 MB

     

     

    (and you only need to post the GPU parts of System Info)

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2013 6:27 PM   in reply to cgk92024

    Photoshop gets the information from the video card driver.

    1696 Meg is what should be returned by the driver.

     

    You should contact Intel so they can troubleshoot their driver on your system.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 3, 2013 6:30 PM   in reply to cgk92024

    Maybe this will help.

     

     

    VRAM comes in 2 variations. If you have a dedicated video card, where the GPU is a seperate component from the computer, the VRAM is located directly on the video card.

     

    If you use a integrated graphics adapter, there is no VRAM on the system. Instead, through software, your computer utilizes some of your normal RAM as video memory.

     

    This method is called shared memory and while it is a cheap option, it sacrifices a lot on performance.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 4, 2013 9:30 AM   in reply to cgk92024

    It shouldn't be that difficult, but your video card driver is not working correctly.

    Until the driver gets fixed, the GPU functions cannot work correctly because of the bugs in the driver.

     

    To use the GPU, the application requires a working GPU driver.

    Your driver is not working correctly, so the GPU features cannot be used.

    To use the GPU features, you need to get a working GPU driver - which can only come from the GPU maker.

     

    All in all, this is about as complicated as noticing a flat tire and getting it fixed.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 4, 2013 9:46 AM   in reply to cgk92024

    You would have a lot less problems if you bought a discrete video card from ATI or nVideo.  Can get a good card for $50 - $100

     
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  • Noel Carboni
    23,526 posts
    Dec 23, 2006
    Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 4, 2013 10:30 AM   in reply to cgk92024

    cgk92024 wrote:

     

    In summary, I've given up.  This is just too hard (and it shouldn't be)

     

    People generally try to help you use what you have, opposed to advising you spend more money.

     

    This is a case where you will need to spend more money to get better computer hardware on which to run state-of-the-art graphics editing software.

     

    -Noel

     
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