Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Font Folders (i.e. Comprehensive CS-wide Font organization!)

Jan 5, 2013 6:12 AM

Tags: #illustrator #photoshop #fonts #after_effects #premiere_pro #cs #font_list #font_organization #font_folders #cs_organization #font_lists #font_previews

Having zero built-in font organization in CS is akin to using Premiere Pro without bins or Photoshop without layers.  In other words, it's a mess!  I've seen other posts suggesting ways to organize fonts, yet none that I felt present a complete solution.  With that said, here is my suggested solution to the current lack of font organization in CS:

 

Font Folders

Features:

  • Ability to create collapsible (i.e. 'twirlable') Font Folders at the top of each CS program's Font List.
  • Ability to add (drag-drop)/remove/reorder/rename fonts within these folders, and add the same fonts to several folders.
  • Four permanent 'Master' Font Folders at the top of each CS program's font list:
      • 'Program Name Fonts' (e.g. 'Photoshop Fonts')
      • 'CS Fonts'
      • 'Program Name Projects' (e.g. 'Premiere Pro Projects')
      • 'Font List'
  • 'Program Name Fonts' would be Font Folders that only appear in the respective program in which they were created.  Thus, a 'Wedding Videos' Font Folder created in Premiere Pro would only appear in that program.
  • 'CS Fonts' would be Font Folders that automatically appear in every other CS program.  Thus, a 'Favorites' Font Folder created in Photoshop would automatically appear in Illustrator, AE, PP and other relevant CS programs.  Any eventual changes made to this folder, in any CS program, would automatically appear in every other CS program.
  • 'Program Name Projects' would be automatically created Font Folders to keep track of the fonts used in previous projects.  Thus, should a video editor want to reuse the same 10 fonts that were used in a project from a year ago, referencing those fonts would be as simple as opening the respective Font Folder.  For greater organization, Project folders should automatically be categorized into root folders by year, and allow the same renaming/deleting/reordering as the other two types of Font Folders.
  • 'Font List': putting all installed fonts into their own collapsible folder would allow users to twirl this folder closed when they only want to focus on fonts within other Font Folder categories.
  • Right-clicking on any Master Font Folder or Font (Sub-)Folder could give users contextual menu options to export/import the Font Folder structure and/or the fonts within them. This would make sharing fonts and/or Font Folders between users and between computer systems quick and easy.
  • These contextual menus should also give users the option to 'Sort Alphabetically'.
  • Right-clicking on the 'Font List' folder could give users different display options:
      • Display all installed fonts
      • Display uncategorized fonts (only shows fonts that have not been manually added to a Font Folder by user)
      • Diplay unused fonts (only shows fonts that have not been used, i.e. do not appear in the 'Program Name Projects' Font Folders.
  • By default, Adobe could populate the 'CS Fonts' folder with standard categories, such as 'Serif', 'Sans Serif', 'Fixed width', etc, to organize its default CS fonts.
  • Every font folder should contain a preview of each font, just like fonts in Photoshop's Font List do.  For maximum usefulness, the default characters 'Sample' should automatically be replaced by the first 1-30 user-selected characters within the program's interface.  Thus, should a Premiere Pro user want to compare how the title 'Jenny+Edward' looks in all 20 fonts in his/her 'Wedding Videos' Font Folder, doing so would be as simple and instantaneous as selecting the text in the Titler, and twirling open the 'Wedding Videos' Font Folder!
  • A horizontal resize bar at the top of each CS program's Font List (just like the bar at the bottom of Premiere Pro's Project Window) would allow users to resize font names and font previews within all 4 Font Folders.  This would ensure a perfect viewing size for all users, on all resolution monitors.


Why should editors have to scroll through a list of 100, 300, or 500+ installed fonts that are completely inappropriate for a certain title, every time they want to locate and compare the 5-10 fonts that are well suited? Allowing this kind of intuitive, built-in font organization, with a simple drag & drop interface, would be a God-send and set Adobe apart as the first software company to address font management in this way!

 

Comments?  Ideas?  Missing features?  Please share!

 

ps. My 'Project Name Fonts' idea may be harder to program by virtue of requiring automation.  This feature could therefore be released in a subsequent version, should its omission allow for the sooner release of the other features I suggest.  Thank you.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 7:14 AM   in reply to PierreLouisBeranek

    I totally agree, the fonts are a mess in Premiere.

    The fonts I use the most are set up in a Title Style.

    So please file a feature request:

    http://www.adobe.com/cfusion/mmform/index.cfm?name=wishform

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 9:08 AM   in reply to PierreLouisBeranek

    Fonts typically go into the Windows/Fonts folder.  This makes them available to all installed programs.  For myself, I don't feel the need for any more system level organization that that, and believe any other method would actually create an unholy mess, a nightmare of organization (at the system level, at least).

     

    Now, if your suggesting a method of organizing fonts into user folders within the program (like clips into bins), and which doesn't have any effect at all on actual file or folder location of installed fonts on the hard drive; that I would not object to.

     

    Another possible solution would be a new Font Manager program, sort of like Bridge for fonts.  This would allow you to browse all installed fonts, sort and organize them for viewing as desired, buy new ones if needed, install and remove fonts, etc.  Combine this with a search bar at the top of every Font list in programs like PP, AE, PS, etc., and we then have full screen preview of the fonts, along with an easy method to call up just the right font when we make our decision.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 10:50 AM   in reply to PierreLouisBeranek

    I just use a font manager (Extensis Suitcase in my case), so that I can group my fonts by style, Project, Client, or however else I want them. I seldom have more than about 350 fonts installed to my OS, at a time, and when I need a particular Font Set, I can just load that, on the fly, so that all of my Adobe programs can access them.

     

    Now, and as most programs rely mainly on the OS's font handling capabilities, and listings, it might be worthwhile contacting MS, or Apple, and asking that they do Bins, or similar.

     

    In my case, I have, besides my installed fonts (in Windows), a separate folder "Fonts," under which I have my PS Fonts, TT Fonts, OTF Fonts, and a few others. Suitcase has all of those folders linked, and then to my Font Sets. That has worked for me, even with 19,000 + fonts on the system (just not installed).

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 11:03 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Amazing. 19,000+ fonts.

     

    My guess is that in all the years I have been using computers (and I go back to well before the PC), not counting projects for my wife, I have probably needed about 100 fonts. Maybe. Probably less. Serif, San Serif, bold, italic, the occasional Comic Sans, proportional, non proportional. Oh, and the Walt Disney font, of course.

     

    I have always considered myself artistically challenged, but still. How in the world would one use so many fonts? I have many more than I need installed on my PC, certainly. It happens when you install Adobe products. But I never use many of them.

     

    I can certainly see why you would need a 3d party application to keep track of them. And why you would want Adobe to take the lead. My goodness. 19,000+ fonts? Really???

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 2:25 PM   in reply to PierreLouisBeranek

    Like Bill, I use a Font Manager.

     

    I keep a minimal amount of fonts loaded in the system and thats make anything to do with fonts in my video and graphics applications , easy. ie a short list to peruse

     

    Luckily ..TVCs generally use only a few "classic fonts" generally or a client specific font.

     

    Searching in the Font Manager thru' my 2 font resources ( maybe a 1000 fonts) on the NAS or internally is easy and fast on the occasion its needed. Loading takes seconds and its immediately available to the graphics application.

     

    FWIW - I use another little font managing application '2manyfonts' to rid myself of the multitude of extremely annoying "asian fonts" that Adobe insists I need with every time there is an upgrade or update to the software.   A thousand dragon curses on these fonts!

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 2:40 PM   in reply to shooternz

    2manyfonts

    Good tip, thanks.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 3:13 PM   in reply to PierreLouisBeranek

    1. One possibility is that writing one new program to do the job might well be easier than adding the feature to every existing program.  Another possibility is that a separate program might be more functional, have more options than an integrated feature, such as the aforementioned buying of new fonts, searching the Internet for and downloading of free fonts, or installing and removing fonts.  There might also be some sort of integration with Adobe Illustrator, a program often used to actually create fonts.  Another is that a separate program would normally provide a lot more screen real estate for previewing fonts, including the ability to preview the same text in multiple fonts simultaneously.

     

    2. Adobe's own Font Manager would not be "third-party".

     

    3. Not necessarily.  If the Font Manager program were automatically loaded when opening any Adobe program that allowed user font selection (with a preference to turn off such autoloading), you could add a right click option to selected text called Preview Fonts.  As it's already loaded, calling the Font Manager to the fore would be very quick and allow a larger preview along with multiple font previews for the same text.  Any font selection made, or even changes to the text, while in the Font Manager would automatically show up in the host application, a Dynamic Link type of thing.

     

    4. Same as 2.  Adobe's app would come with the Creative Cloud, or as does Bridge and AME, bundled with individual programs if purchased separately.

     

    5. Not sure how this is an argument against a separate app.  Previewing in a new program would easily solve the current disparity between programs.

     

    6. Not sure I agree with either point here.  Some call for integrating AE into PP, but I think that would be a disaster.  Each application has it's own specialty and mode of operation, and they're better kept separate.  And as mentioned in point 1, I do believe a separate program could be made more functional, offer more features, than would be practical for an integrated feature. Like AME can do more with exporting than PP can alone, a separate Font Manager could do more than each individual program.

     

    Adobe could even go so far as to create Adobe Titler, a font manager as previously discussed as well as a fully featured titling program, with full Dynamic Link between PP, AE, PS, Encore and more.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 2:55 PM   in reply to shooternz

    the multitude of extremely annoying "asian fonts" that Adobe insists I need with every time there is an upgrade or update to the software.

     

    Is that where those damn things come from?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 8:26 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Is that where those damn things come from?

     

    Yes.

     

    Google "2manyfonts" and use the current  .bat file to lose them.

     

    Works perfectly ... but its tiresome having to do it every update.

     

    Its one of the many  other little things that Adobe does just to niggle me. 

     

    eg. Font Droppings as well as Opacity Keyframe Droppings...and then there is Flash Updates

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 6, 2013 1:42 AM   in reply to shooternz

    PierreLouisBeranek,

     

    Perhaps English is not your native tongue. You obviously did not understand what I said. Perhaps if you read it again?

     

    I said:

     

    I can certainly see why you would need a 3d party application to keep track of them. And why you would want Adobe to take the lead.

     

    That means that I understand why you want Adobe to take the lead. To do the work. To provide you with what you want. I thought that was pretty clear.

     

    I never suggest anything that doesn't make sense and I might resent the accusation if I thought that English was your native tongue. You certainly use it well, but perhaps my attempt at humor confused you?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 6, 2013 9:29 AM   in reply to PierreLouisBeranek

    There are several functions in the various CS programs, that directly rely on the OS, and its method of handling things. This might be via the fonts, installed into the OS, file Saving dialogs, file Opening dialogs, and some others.

     

    Adobe has chosen, that than write their own functions, to rely on those in the OS already.

     

    Now, I can see a benift of arranging fonts, within the CS programs. I could use that in PS, Illustrator and InDesign, mostly, and admit that it would benefit me to maybe NOT display all of the ~ 350 loaded at any one time, in Titler, since I probably use only about 10 with any regularity. However, that would require some re-coding, since the font list display comes from the OS.

     

    To get around sorting through ~ 350 fonts in Titler, I have just created Styles, for my common fonts, and the normal treatment, that I apply to them - not perfect, and not as clean as your suggestion, but it works fine for me, with Adobe's reliance on some OS functions.

     

    I would offer support for a Feature Request, but not sure how far that would go, and how many resources would be required to cut the "umbilical cord" with the OS. I worry that those resources could be better spent, fixing some things (spanned Clips comes to mind) in PrPro.

     

    Just my observation,

     

    Hunt

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 6, 2013 9:42 AM   in reply to Steven L. Gotz

    Steven,

     

    Way, way back when, as I started doing almost as much graphic design, as I was advertising photography, Adobe had a neat collection of fonts, and offered them on CD, in preview. One could use that collection, with the included viewer, to find the font (from the Adobe collection), and then buy the license for that. At a point, they offered a killer deal on the whole collection (about 5,000 Adobe PS fonts, IIRC). I bought the whole deal, so that I did not have to search through the collection, then buy each necessary font, as needed. It came to about $0.25/font, so I sprung for it. Not all THAT long later, Adobe dropped that collection (will have to find one of those old CD's, to recall the name of that), and sort of cooled it, regarding fonts, for a bit.

     

    I have also bought many display fonts, from foundries like Chank, as those were needed, along with many LinoType font families.

     

    In that pile of fonts, I also have several free font collections, however many of those found their way to the trashcan, as they were not well-written, and did not work well in many Adobe programs.

     

    Last, I have been creating some fonts, that contribute to the bloat.

     

    Not counted in that number are about 1,000 Corel fonts from the earlier CorelDraw program. Those did not work that well with Adobe programs, and most post-production houses refused to buy them, so I found little use for them. Still have all those CD's, but have not used any in decades. I still use the clip art from some of those collections, but not so much anymore.

     

    Now that I do mostly video, my font usage has slowed to a crawl. I still head over to Chank, from time to time, seeking a specific "look" for a display font in a Title (usually a Main Title), but like I once did. Also, and for years, every month Chank would offer some "free fonts," and out of habit, I would just click the link in their e-mails, and get those. They WERE well-written, and I cannot recall ever having one not work in an Adobe program. Over the last few years, I have probably used fewer than the fonts currently installed, though still have my Font Sets for Projects and clients (though I have retired).

     

    Guess that collecting fonts just became a hobby?

     

    Hunt

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 6, 2013 9:46 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Even Adobe's ATM has sort of gone the way of the dodo. Going back to when they were earlier in the "font business," they bought a wonderful font manager, FontMinder, but killed it, in favor of the inferior (IMHO) ATM.

     

    Now, that code is likely still sitting in a vault at Adobe, and if it could be ported for current OS's, would be ideal, and especially if Adobe programs could directly access that, rather than the OS's font function.

     

    Hunt

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 6, 2013 11:46 AM   in reply to PierreLouisBeranek

    Take a look at High Logic Main Type while you are looking at Font Management.

     

    http://www.high-logic.com/font-manager/maintype.html

     

    I dont know if its the best ...but I like it.

     

    It does not integrate with Premiere as such ...but it works nicely alongside it.

     

    eg ifg I need to load or unload a font...I open it alongside (any Adobe graphics app) and do so. 

     

    Its value is that one can group Fonts as one would wish, load / unload whatever...whenever and view fonts clearly and simply in the window.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 10, 2013 7:01 AM   in reply to shooternz
     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points