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deeve5603
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Noob PSE 11 Editing/Laptop Questions

Jan 5, 2013 7:47 AM

Tags: #slow #gopro #macbookpro

Hello all, I have been reading through the forums and taking some tutorials to learn about PSE11. I am currently using the trial version to see how I like it. I am running into some frustrations and hope the group and help with some answers.

 

My goal is to edit GoPro Hero 3 Black edition videos.  FWIW, it is my understanding the GPH3 can take some pretty high quality videos.  I am currently trying to edit the videos on a Mid 2009 Macbook Pro 2.26GHz  Core 2 Duo with 4GB of ram and a single 160GB HDD.  I am waiting for the mail to deliver more ram, so I can run at the machines max of 8GB.

 

As you can guess, my problems are very chopping playback and SLOW editing.  Everything is laggy causing problems editing because I get the spinning wheel or just slow reaction quite often and cannot be too exact with things.  I just tried a Smart Fix to a 1.5 min clip and it took about 25 minutes. Rendering a 10 min video takes over an hour and the machine gets very hot.  Obviously I am taxing the computer doing this. 

 

I am not looking to make money or get professional results.  I am a brand new Noob with taking videos and editing, but want to learn. The problem is that it is so slow, it gets frustrating.  My questions are, will this machine every be able to smoothly edit videos? I could upgrade the HDD to a SSD and get a second drive to store the videos/pics/general storage, but what do you all think the results will be?  Will I be happy with them, or still get the long publishing/editing times that are CPU intensive?

 

Thanks!

DAVE

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 5, 2013 8:27 AM   in reply to deeve5603

    Because Premiere Elements does not edit GoPro natively, you'll need to render the video continually as you work -- whenever you see yellow lines above the clips on the timeline in Expert view. To render, press the Return/Enter key or click on the Render button.

     

    You're working with the trial version of Premiere Elements, so it hasnt got all of the components installed. You'll get a bit better performance when you buy and register the program -- but, with GoPro footage, there are not guarantees. The program can edit it somewhat. But, with a laptop that's giving your marginal performance, it may not be the best software for you.

     

    Try rendering the timeline and see if that improves your performance to an acceptable level. If it still seems sluggish, I'd recommend you not go with Premiere Elements and consider another editing program.

     
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    Jan 5, 2013 8:34 AM   in reply to deeve5603

    If you are editing AVCHD, or any other H.264 material, the CPU will be the most important factor for smooth editing and playback. I recommend a fast i7, but some do get by with a slower i5. It boils down to their tolerance for slow and choppy playback.

     

    Now, the GoPro 3 can shoot in several formats, and if I understand correctly (do not have one), it can record up to 4K, which is a professional format, often used by Hollywood. If one is planning to edit 4K, then they do not want a laptop, but a full editing workstation, built expressly for editing that material. However, if one is shooting AVCHD, then the computer specs. fall dramatically. Then, a fast CPU, as much RAM as is possible, and ideally a 2x HDD (or SSD/HDD) I/O setup will be just fine. One will not need dedicated RAID arrays for the media and Export drives. Go to 4K footage, and the requirements go up exponentially. This is because of the high number of pixels in 4K footage.

     

    As I do not do Mac, and do not know their equipment, I can only talk in very general terms. Our MOD, Steve Grisetti, does use a Mac, and edits AVCHD, so he can offer more specific Mac recs.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jan 5, 2013 8:35 AM   in reply to Bill Hunt

    Once Dave responds with his results after following my directions we'll have a better idea if his computer is capable of working with this footage.

     
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    Jan 5, 2013 9:21 AM   in reply to deeve5603
     
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    Jan 5, 2013 9:38 AM   in reply to deeve5603

    The yellow lines you are refering to are the horizontal ones going across the clip about 3/4 to the top?

    That sounds like the Effects Keyframing "rubber band." The colored lines referred to are the ones above the Clip right below the Timeline Ruler. This article goes into more detail, though some of it is for PrPro: http://forums.adobe.com/message/4068277#4068277

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jan 5, 2013 10:22 AM   in reply to deeve5603

    If you have no colored lines above your Clips, when they have been dragged to the Timeline, that means that your Clips match your Project Preset 100%.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jan 5, 2013 10:30 AM   in reply to deeve5603

    With the Duo-Core CPU and limited RAM, when working with H.264 material, I would say that is about right, but do not have a computer with similar specs. to benchmark for you. Maybe others, with similar machines and footage, can comment.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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    Jan 5, 2013 2:52 PM   in reply to deeve5603

    The single 5400rpm hdd isn't helping.

    You are correct there. To effectively edit video, one really needs a 7200 RPM min. HDD, and spreading the I/O load over two, physical 7200 RPM HDD's, will benefit greatly.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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