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MOyler45
Currently Being Moderated

Blurry Photos

Jan 8, 2013 4:31 PM

Tags: #photos #pictures #blurry #pe11

I'm using PE11 to make a picture slideshow video.

 

I imported high resolution photos and they are blurry upon playback.  After reading many similar posts, I realize I needed to resize my photos so they they won't be blurry.  In addition, I rendered my project.

 

Unfortunately after resizing my photos to no larger than 1000x750, my pictures are still blurry. I thought maybe they were too big, so I resized them again to half that size.  Still they are blurry.

 

I'm new to using PE11, so clearly I'm missing something. Also, many of these similar posts were answered with "Use Photoshop to resize your pictures."  I don't have PS (nor can I afford it), so please don't answer this post with anything pertaining to that program. 

 

Question is:  what do I need to do in order for my photos to be clear upon playback?

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 8, 2013 5:08 PM   in reply to MOyler45

    What is the Frame Size, in the Project Preset, that you chose at New Project?

     

    Also, remember that if you are working on a DVD oriented Project, you are dealing with relatively low-resolution material (720 x 480), so if you are viewing that on a high-rez computer monitor, it will never look all that good.

     

    In the Program Monitor, I recommend testing the sharpness of the Timeline material at 100% (scaling up the Program Monitor to fit the 100% Magnification, in lieu of choosing Fit).

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 9, 2013 7:10 AM   in reply to MOyler45

    The Program Monitor is the viewer, where you view your Timeline in playback. If you Rt-click on it, you will get a menu, and in it will be Magnification. There, you can set the magnification. The default is Fit, but I like viewing at 100%, to see the quality, at its highest level. Note: you will likely have to resize the Program Monitor, to see the full Frame. See this image:

    PrE_Program_Monitor.png

    Note: your program interface, the GUI, will likely look a bit different, depending on the version of PrE, that you have.

     

    If one has created a Project, that matches their Source Footage 100%, the sharpness should be, as good as it gets. If one is working with SD (Standard Definition) footage, but viewing on an HD (High Definition) screen, whether a computer monitor, and especially at Full Screen, then there will be a noticable degradation in the quality, as the footage is being scaled up by about 4x. If the viewer is not going Full Screen, then the quality will seem better. Same with an HD TV.

     

    One potential benefit, if the material goes to a DVD, and then the viewer plays that DVD to an HD TV from a BD (Blu-ray Disc) player, or an up-rezzing DVD player, there are scaling chips in the player, that up-rez the DVD-Video, so it is actually better, than that DVD-Video being played with an older DVD player. It will never be HD, as that would take shooting HD, creating a BD and playing that through a BD player.

     

    Now, if one is using ONLY Still Images (no Video), one workflow would be to create an HD Project, Scale the Still Images to match that, edit, and output to an HD file, to be played on a high-rez computer monitor, or TV. One could also burn a BD, for playback on an HD TV through a BD player. The recipients would need a BD player to feed the BD to their TV, but any video software player should be able to play just the file, and even at Full Screen, will look at good, and sharp, as is possible.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 2:02 PM   in reply to MOyler45
     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 2:05 PM   in reply to MOyler45

    With ONLY the Still Images, and no delivery to DVD-Video, or BD (Blu-ray Disc), just YouTube, or Vimeo, I would choose the 1920 x 1080 HD Preset for either NTSC, or PAL, determined by where you live, 30i, or 25i (again, determined by NTSC, or PAL) and 48KHz 16-bit Audio. The PAR (Pixel Aspect Ratio), will be 1.0, or Square Pixels, which is what your Still Images will already have.

     

    Then, using whatever Image-editing program you use, Scale the Stills to 1920 x 1080. Not sure about the Scaling algorithms in Picasa, or really any other program, beyond Photoshop, as that is what I use. If you need to Pan on a Still Image, that is fully Zoomed Out, then you could Scale to 2000 x 1500. What I like about Photoshop is that it allows me to use one of two great Scaling algorithms: Bicubic Smoother, or Bicubic Sharper. I alternate between those, depending on the subject matter, and how well I feel that each works with that/those Image(s). Just do not know about other programs.

     

    In the Scaling, the only things that matter are the pixel x pixel dimensions. DPI, and PPI are meaningless for Video.

     

    I would rip the Audio from your Video file, with a program, like the great, free Audacity, and Save that to PCM/WAV 48KHz 16-bit, which will Import fine into your Project. For any music files, I would do the same, as PCM/WAV 48KHz 16-bit is as good as it gets.

     

    The above, with the exception of Photoshop figuring into my workflow, is just how I do it, with great results.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 21, 2013 5:07 PM   in reply to MOyler45

    If you are in NTSC land, then I would choose the 1920 x 1080 i (Interlaced) and 30 for the FPS.

     

    As PrE can only Export/Share/Publish to 2-channel, stereo, and as you are not likely Importing DD 5.1 SS Audio, I would not choose the 5.1 Channel Preset.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 22, 2013 1:50 PM   in reply to MOyler45

    When using portrait orientation Images, one has a few options.

     

    They could just Scale those so that their vertical dimensions match the vertical dimensions of the Frame, and leave the black bars on the side, or perhaps do something like this: http://forums.adobe.com/message/2471303#2471303. Or, they could Scale the Image up, until it fills the width of the Frame, and just let the top and/or bottom be effectively cropped by the Video Frame. However, with that much up-rezzing, quality will suffer.

     

    To handle the smaller Image Sizes, I would go with something like leaving the black bars, or doing the "abstract background," rather then Scaling UP, unless the sizes were very close. Again, up-rezzing will cause the quality to go down.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 26, 2013 4:39 PM   in reply to MOyler45

    The exact pixel x pixel dimensions depend on what you need to do.

     

    I will Scale to the exact Frame Size for my Project, unless I need to Pan on a Zoomed Out Image, and then, will calculate exactly how many pixels I will need for what I intend.

     

    In the case of HD, where you will see 1920 x 1080 and 2000 x 1500, that is a personal choice. The 2000 x 1500 gives one "wiggle room," and then they CAN do a bit of Panning on the full Frame.

     

    I, OTOH, like to pare things down to the "lowest common denominator," and go exact sizes. As I might have 1500 Images in a Timeline, I do not want to process any more pixels, that I need to. The 2000 x 1500 is just a good "rule of thumb."

     

    The choice is yours to make.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 4, 2013 11:31 AM   in reply to MOyler45

    This is an awesome video, Michelle! Thanks for sharing it! Great job!

     
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