Skip navigation
Currently Being Moderated

Incorrect Pantone Plus values in CS6?

Jan 23, 2013 4:45 PM

Tags: #photoshop #cs6 #creative_cloud #pantone_plus

There is a noticeable difference between color values specified in Pantone books/Color Manager and CS6. For instance, the correct RGB value for Pantone 158 CP should be 228/126/26, whereas Photoshop's RGB value for the same color is 245/127/41.

 

I have a subscription to Creative Cloud and all applications are up to date. When will this be fixed?

 

Screen Shot 2013-01-23 at 4.39.17 PM.pngScreen Shot 2013-01-23 at 4.39.57 PM.png

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2013 5:03 PM   in reply to kf420

    The Pantone values came straight from Pantone.

     

    There is nothing to be fixed.

     

    You're just confusing several things.

    Pantone CP means CoatedPaper -- it's a specific spot color, so it has LAB values.  It has no specific RGB values, and that color has to be converted into whatever RGB profile you are using at the time (for example: the numbers for sRGB and ProPhoto will be different).  The same goes for CMYK - the spot color has no specific CMYK values and has to be converted (coated and uncoated papers will need different numbers, as will different ink types).  Pantone does have suggested sRGB values (in an sRGB book that we don't ship), and suggested CMYK values for certain printing conditions (and we do ship some of those).

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2013 7:46 PM   in reply to kf420

    Photoshop's Pantone Color Bridge Coated and Uncoated books are defined as CMYK values. The value you get for a given colour, say 158 CP, in a sRGB document varies depending on the Working CMYK profile and conversion options revealed by the More Options button in Color Settings.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2013 6:31 PM   in reply to kf420

    No, you don't seem to undestand the Pantone books.

     

    The Color Bridge provides suggested CMYK values for specific printing conditions to simulate the actual Pantone spot colors (many of which are outside of that CMYK gamut).

     

    And hex value are not colors, just numbers.

    Again, the numbers will have to differ depending on the RGB colorspace involved.

    And the numbers will only be correct if the application correctly color manages them (ie: sRGB numbers don't look right on an Adobe RGB display unless the application converts the numbers to Adobe RGB).

     

     

    You appear to be mis-using the Pantone values in your case, based on a misunderstanding of color and the Pantone books.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2013 7:31 PM   in reply to kf420

    Ah, yes, their Color Manager app (had to go look it up) will show you RGB and CMYK values.  But again, it's just values for specific conditions to simulate the spot colors.  Photoshop doesn't include the suggested sRGB values for the Pantone colors, just the more accurate spot color definitions and some CMYK versions that are widely used.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 23, 2013 7:56 PM   in reply to kf420

    You can create and save a set of swatches for your project where each colour is defined as an RGB value (copy the hex from your Pantone utility, paste into the Photoshop Color Picker and click "Add to Swatches") and given the Pantone Color Bridge name. The Swatches panel can display as "Small List" or "Large List" so each colour and its Pantone name are seen.

     

    Screen-shot-2013-01-24-at-03.53.41.png

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2013 4:54 AM   in reply to conroy

    I'm glad that helped. Contrary to Chris Cox's accusations, you were attempting to use the Pantone Color Bridge Coated book correctly, and the problem was that the Photoshop book's colours are wrongly defined as CMYK values instead of RGB/Hex values.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2013 5:16 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    "CP" stands for Coated-Process, just as "UP" stands for Uncoated-Process.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2013 10:32 AM   in reply to conroy

    A book that defines CMYK values really shouldn't contain RGB hex values...

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2013 11:39 AM   in reply to Chris Cox

    Chris Cox wrote:

     

    A book that defines CMYK values really shouldn't contain RGB hex values...

     

    The Pantone Color Bridge books are supposed to contain RGB hex values. Contact Pantone and get the books fixed.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2013 11:40 AM   in reply to kf420

    kf420 wrote:

     

    I confirmed with Pantone on this, the RGB values specified in Color Bridge are the best possible match to the spot color itself and not its CMYK simulation.

     

    Correct.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 23, 2013 6:32 PM   in reply to conroy

    I recently had to provide a client with matching sRGB colours for their new branding. I tried to use the numbers in the Color Bridge Coated book. Why not, since it provides an sRGB recipe. But the results are not good. I suspect that these sRGB are recipes are to replicate the CMYK results, not the Pantone spot colours. As far as I am concerned, if true, this is wrong; I want a sRGB value the closest to the perceived value to the spot colour, not the CMYK best approximation. Always aim back to the best source possible, the spot colour here.

    So the best way to optain these sRGB "unpublished" colours is to use the software from Pantone. You could fork out 50$ to buy a mediocre product called Pantone Color Manager, or simply use the iOs myPantone app ($9.99). In these applications, use the Coated Spot (not Bridge) colours and find the sRGB recipes. In my tests, these look the closest to the spot colour, and at least you have a reliable source for your recipe instead of fiddling with your Adobe software to have the perfect environment to gather the sRGB recipe.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jul 23, 2013 8:07 PM   in reply to SylvainLemire

    Or you could select from the spot color book in Photoshop and let Photoshop convert the color values to your document color...

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points