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converting color .jpg image to grayscale

Jan 24, 2013 12:37 PM

I have a color .jpg image that I want to convert to grayscale and then add annotation. Is this easy to do in Illustrator?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 24, 2013 12:43 PM   in reply to Thomas Crowley

    That depends on the nature of your image and what exactly you want to achieve.

     
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    Jan 24, 2013 2:31 PM   in reply to Thomas Crowley

    Select the image. Use Edit>Edit Colors>Convert to Grayscale to get what you want.

     
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    Jan 24, 2013 4:08 PM   in reply to Thomas Crowley

    Thomas Crowley wrote:

     

    I've opened the .jpg image in Illustrator. It is a line drawing.

     

    Those two statements constitute a logical fallacy. A JPEG image is a bitmap, and not, in any way or fashion, a "line drawing". Therefore,

     

    ...I cannot edit individual parts of the drawing.

     

    is because the "individual parts" of the image are single color pixels. To "edit" these, you need a bitmap editor.

     

    It's necessary to say "edit" (w/quotes) because you will be editing pixels. Any notion of 'lines', 'planes', and 'shades' only exist in your mind, and not as physical separate objects somewhere inside the bitmap. If you think you can "select" a big black square "object" in the bitmap editor, well, that's because the software only makes you think you can (it's easy to scan for the edge of a single color filled region).

     

    ... I just felt you might need to know this.

     
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    Jan 24, 2013 5:46 PM   in reply to [Jongware]

    A JPEG image is a bitmap, and not, in any way or fashion, a "line drawing".

    Actually, the terms "line art" and "line drawing" have been used interchangeably in the reproduction graphics industry since long before programs like Illustrator even existed. In that context it means an original image that contains only solids, and therefore does not require halftoning, as opposed to continuous-tone (often called "contone") which does. Line art (i.e.; a line drawing) can be rendered in a raster image as easily as vector paths. In fact, any 1-bit raster image can rightly be called line art, whether it contains any continuous "lines" or not.

     

    So when Thomas said his JPEG is a line drawing, he could be simply saying it is not an image of continuous-tone artwork or photography.

     

    JET

     
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    Jan 24, 2013 10:15 PM   in reply to Thomas Crowley

    Best way to deal with rastered imagery is in Photoshop. There are several ways to convert color to grayscale, with lots of control over the process.

     
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