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Alex DeJesus 496 posts
Jul 25, 2008
Currently Being Moderated

Roto Brush Will Not Hold One Frame to Next

Jan 27, 2013 10:52 AM

Roto Good.jpgRoto NG 1.jpg

What am I missing? Roto brush tool does an awesome job with the initial mask, but a few frames down the line a patch above the head appears. I brush it out, but it reappears on the next frame. The rest of the mask is perfect and holds all the way through, but that one spot will not go away. It seems I have to paint in every frame, which isn't too bad, but doesn't seem right. I tried different brush sizes, refine mat, smoothing, and different Edge Detection settings but no help. Clip is 10 seconds long H264 in CS6 Windows

 

I can eliiminate most of that area, but sometimes nothing happens when I paint a stroke. I am holding the Alt key

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Jan 27, 2013 10:32 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    Hard to tell from your screenshot, but it seems you are working against the effects smartness by adding too many base frames. This happens when you don't let it propagate and place paint strokes too closely together in time. Let it finish the analysis and extend the propagation region by pulling out the bar left and right, then only refine the areas it doesn't get right with the automated detection.

     

    Mylenium

     
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    Jan 27, 2013 12:37 PM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    " just found a tutorial video"

     

     

    There should be more than one, and they will help a lot, I think.  Rotobrush isn't the most intuitive tool on the planet, and a little push in the right direction helps.

     

    And 20 strokes is A LOT!

     
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    Jan 27, 2013 5:51 PM   in reply to Dave LaRonde

    I recommend going through the resources here before using Roto Brush:

    http://blogs.adobe.com/aftereffects/2010/04/roto-brush-in-after-effect s-cs.html

     
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    Jan 28, 2013 10:12 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    I think you may have misinterpreted Mylenium's meaning.  The demands of a particular shot determine the job at hand.  To do rotoscoping well is a time-consuming, painstaking, detail-oriented task. 

     

    Rotobrush makes the task easier, but it doesn't make it automatic. 

     
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    Jan 28, 2013 10:13 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    There's no conflict between what Mylenium and the Meyers' tutorial said; it's just a matter of degree. Depending on the shot and how precise you need the edge to be, things will be more or less automatic.

     

    > So, for a 10-second clip, that's a heck of a lot of work and time.

     

    It's probably a lot less work and time than doing it the old way, manually changning the shape of several masks on each frame.

     
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    Jan 28, 2013 11:16 AM   in reply to Alex DeJesus

    Yes, you have that right, but I think you and I approach rotoscoping from different viewpoints.

     

    For me, roto work represents one of the most dreadful jobs imaginable in AE.  I avoid it as much as possible.  I get the notion that you feel it's no big deal, and they should have figured this stuff out by now for the benefit of the users. 

     

    I expect the truth is some place in between.  So I'm listening & learning here.

     
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