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ratgui
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Problems converting from CS4 - eps files show TIFF error

Feb 2, 2013 4:54 PM

Having downloaded the latest version of Indesign CS6, I have tried to open several douments of a music tutor featuring many EPS music graphics along with many Tiff images. However, I keep getting following error: "Error encountered while reading TIFF image. Image may be damaged or incompatible. Resave the image with different settings and try again."

 

I have resaved all the EPS and Tiff images as CS6 files and relinked them into the document but to no avail - the problem remains. I suspect that the  image files are not actually damaged but that there is some other problem. I have 100s of images and am not sure what next to do. I noticed another user ( Kaleidoscopes Violin) who had a similar problem and it was suggested that "if your CS2 file is still intact, try exporting it to interchange format (.inx), then open the .inx file in CS5 (or CS5.5 which is the current release, and not the same as CS5)." - but this was for CS2 to CS5, and CS6 does not allow .inx file export. I need to work with the document in future so exporting it as a PDF file is of no use to me. Is this a known bug in CS6? I would be grateful for any advice. Thank you.

 
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    Apr 9, 2013 4:23 PM   in reply to ratgui

    Thanks for this post.  I just tried again with CS6 and encountered the same problem as you are!!!  I entered a new question today in the forum.  Hoping for an answer soon.  Best of wishes to you!!

     
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    Jun 26, 2013 9:05 PM   in reply to ratgui

    Thanks so much to Ratgui for this helpful advice.  I was able to use that trick to at least calm down the error messages and work with the documents without going completely batty!  I've been observing the problem since then.

     

    So the results so far ... Indesign CS6 is still badly misbehaving with my EPS files.  On about 80% of them, the note heads don't display at all.  These are the same files that display perfectly in Adobe CS2.  A few of the EPS files display, but even with these it's not consistent.

     

    In a pinch (needed materials printed!!) I resorted to re-exporting all my music graphics as PNG files, but the printout quality of the PNG images leaves much to be desired (visible stairstepping; mild, but enough to look unprofessional).

     

    I'm still hoping for a solution from you software developers out there.  What is the difficulty reading these EPS images that the "old" version of InDesign had no problem with?  I simply do not understand why these issues are occurring to begin with.  Please help!!

     
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    Jun 26, 2013 11:11 PM   in reply to Kaleidoscopes Violin

    Missing noteheads tells me you are having a font problem. Are you using Finale or Sibelius? I haven't used either for a few versions, so I'm not sure what output/export formats are supported, but EPS is an older format that many InDesign users advise against using. You may get better results with PDF, which you can probably export without problem from either Finale or Sibelius, but make sure to embed the fonts if that's possible. Another option would be to open the EPS files in Illustrator (if you have it) and save as PDF or AI. The last resort (which I personally wouldn't want to do unless I had no other choice) would be to export as TIFF at 1,200ppi, but that will give you larger file sizes, and you will lose all of the benefits that the vector formats offer. If you have Photoshop, you may want to compare the quality of an exported TIFF to one opened from an EPS and rastered in Photoshop at 1,200ppi (1-bit black and white mode, not grayscale).

     
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    Jun 26, 2013 11:35 PM   in reply to ratgui

    I am wondering that no one answered here up to today. But I think we are not in music graphics, that will be the problem for the helpers.

    • Yes, EPS is an old file type. When you use a huge number you can run into problems.
    • If the program which creates these files can export or save other file types like ai or eps you should use it instead.
    • If the program does not support any other professionell vector file type make a losless Acrobat Distiller setting, or some kind which will be useful for printing (like x1a type) and put them into the Distiller's window, that will produce pdf files which you should use instead. If there are missing fonts, then you have another source of problems you should solve first.
     
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    Jun 26, 2013 11:37 PM   in reply to Michael Gianino

    Good points Michael.

     

    In addition perhaps - Make sure you have the same exact versions of the fonts used (if _not_ embedded in the EPS) and have them loaded and active on your new machine. (and make sure that none of the fonts are corrupt, by any chance) - also clearing your font caches for InDesign would be wise to do as well, in any event, cannot hurt and can often cause issues if a font cache itself is corrupted.

     

    Cheers, David

     
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    Jun 27, 2013 2:27 AM   in reply to ratgui

    Back to the exporting of .inx/.idml for a moment. It's actually best to do the export froom the original version (.inx from CS2, for example), then open that in CS6 for the conversion, but if that's no longer an option, then opeing the .indd in CS6 and immediatley exporting to .idml would be the next best choice.

     
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    Jun 27, 2013 8:32 AM   in reply to Peter Spier

    Wow ... very, very helpful responses.  I wish I'd posted this earlier!! 

     

    I had no idea that EPS was an older file format, or that PDF was considered a "legitimate" graphics format.  Sibelius 6 only exports to EPS, TIFF (yuck!!), and PNG.  However, I did discover that it "prints" to Adobe PDF.  Odd that the option is located in an unexpected file menu, but very glad it's there!!  The PDF format loads fine into InDesign and also prints beautifully, unlike the PNG option. Yay!! 

     

    As far as embedding fonts, I had been making sure this option was checked (when exporting from Sibelius), so it seems unlikely that was the problem. So in theory that would mean it's not a problem of the InDesign font cache, or of a font discrepancey.  In practice ... who knows.  What's particularly puzzling is that some EPS files are fine, while others were not; and also that CS2 had no problems with any of them.

     

    Regardless, the font information is really, really good to know ... I'll save this thread for future use!

     

    Thanks so much to all for your generous help!!!

    Elise

     
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    Jun 27, 2013 8:46 AM   in reply to Kaleidoscopes Violin

    If you didn't have the Acrobat Pro installed you probably wouldn't have found Adobe PDF in your print menu, but as part of the Acrobat install on Windows (and old versions of OS X) a virtual printer is installed that prints to postscript file, then invokes distiller, and spits out the PDF in one step. You should see it now in all apps.

     

    You do need to be careful, though, when you use it becasue unless you change the print settings at the time you invoke it you'll be using whatever is set for the defualt settings in the printer properties. My recollection is that the 'as installed' default is to use the Standard preset, which converts everythign to RGB and downsamples raster content to 72 ppi, not an appropriate choice for going to print.

     

    You can change on a doc-by-doc basis in the print dialog, or go into the printer poperties and select something else as the default that matches your most common needs, then only fix things when you need to.

     
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