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seantot
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gpu/videocard for new setup

Feb 5, 2013 5:30 AM

Tags: #after_effects #premiere #cs6 #gtx680 #gtx580

Hi! First post so forgive the newbie

 

Anyhow, I've just assembled a new pc to edit 1080p DSLR videos using Premiere and After Effects, both CS6. I'm already using it and it's ok waiting time rendering-wise, but obviously it could improve with the addition of a video card, and a couple more hard drives to be setup properly like it should be.

 

Here's what I currently have:

 

i7 3700 3.4ghz, onboard Intel HD4000 for GPU

16gb 1600 DDR3 (will upgrade to 32gb if still needed)
500gb Caviar blue for OS/Premiere&AE/Scratch/Media - pathetic to be honest

 

I know for starters I should pick up a couple more HDDs to have a proper scratch disk and media drive separated from the OS/Apps drive, which I will definitely do when I get the new card but the question I had is what video card to get.

 

Yes, money is a factor, so unfortunately no gtx680/580's for me. I could spare a bit of cash and pick up a decent card, but obviously, like a regular joe, would also like to save a bit if I can.

 

I would like to be able to keep my render/preview times to a minimum, but at the same time getting a video card that is balanced to the hardware that I currently have. What I meant by balanced, is that the card should be specc'ed enough to be able to utilize my current hardware to it's limits, but not be a bottleneck for the system as well. I'm afraid that having the super cards (that's what I call them, ie. GTX680/580) will overshadow everything that I currently have but then I'm not able to use the card to its full potential since everything else will just be a bottleneck when compared to the video card itself.

 

Hoping for your kind inputs.

 

Regards,
Shaun

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 5, 2013 5:41 AM   in reply to seantot

    Shaun,

     

    I would like to be able to keep my render/preview times to a minimum, but at the same time getting a video card that is balanced to the hardware that I currently have. What I meant by balanced, is that the card should be specc'ed enough to be able to utilize my current hardware to it's limits, but not be a bottleneck for the system as well. I'm afraid that having the super cards (that's what I call them, ie. GTX680/580) will overshadow everything that I currently have but then I'm not able to use the card to its full potential since everything else will just be a bottleneck when compared to the video card itself.

     

    A very sensible approach. Yes, you are right, a 580/680 would be overkill on this system, but a GTX 660 (or 660 Ti) would be a great card to have on your system. Just make sure you disable the Intel graphics in the Bios.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 5, 2013 6:11 AM   in reply to seantot

    [moved to hardware forum]

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 5, 2013 6:40 AM   in reply to seantot

    With your system a GTX 660 would work fine.  Do not pay extra to get the SC or FTW versions. I own two of them and a GTX 680. 

     

    Since there is no i7-3700 CPU I am assuming that you have an i7-3770 and not the -K version so it is not unlocked for overclocking.

     
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    Feb 5, 2013 6:55 AM   in reply to seantot

    sorry a typo there on my part, I meant the 3770 non-k version. So just the bare-bones 660 would be enough? No Ti needed?

     

    Yes, the bare-bones GTX 660 would suffice. The GTX 660 Ti, in your system, would not be sufficiently faster than the non-Ti to justify the additional $80 or so. Maybe for a moderately overclocked i7-3770K CPU-based PC, but not your stock-speed 3770.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 10, 2013 9:08 AM   in reply to seantot

    obviously it could improve with the addition of a video card

     

    I just want to add that speeding up your system with GPU acceleration isn't guaranteed.  Not all things get accelerated.  In particular simple playback is not.  Only those things that do get accelerated will benefit from an nVidia card.  If you're not using any of those things in your work flow, you won't see any performance benefit.

     
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    Feb 10, 2013 10:04 AM   in reply to seantot

    Adding to what Jim said, this had some information on what CUDA does

     

    http://blogs.adobe.com/premiereprotraining/2011/02/red-yellow-and-gree n-render-bars.html

     
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