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Babada the explorer
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Does Adobe Dynamic Links slow down the rendering process ?

Feb 9, 2013 6:24 AM

Hello everybody,

 

I have a question concerning Adobe Dynamic Links.

 

This is my problem :

I work on After Effects. I have a composition that is rendered quite fast. (almost in real time...)

 

But when I open the linked comp in Premiere Pro, it lags as hell. Maybe 2x, 3x slower.

 

So I'd like to know why Adobe Premiere Pro is slow, while After Effects is fast ?

Is this normal ?

What can I do about it ?

 

Thanks,

Regards.

 

Josef Retsnbergïk

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 6:51 AM   in reply to Babada the explorer

    2 programs, 2 times the RAM and processor usage - even an invisible AE consumes lots of RAM. And yes, sure, the required communication overhead adds a performance penalty as well.... Perfectly normal. Using DL will never be as fast as natively working in the program. If that is inconvenient, render the clip in AE and import it into AE....

     

    Mylenium

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 7:46 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    In addition to the factors that Mylenium mentioned, consider that the headless version of After Effects that is rendering frames for Premiere Pro over Dynamic Link is restricted to one process, whereas the main After Effects application can use multiple processes simultaneously.

     

    The best way to maximize performance is to cache or pre-render the frames in After Effects so that they don't need to be calculated by the headless version.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 2:57 PM   in reply to Todd_Kopriva

    Todd_Kopriva wrote:

     

    ...consider that the headless version of After Effects that is rendering frames for Premiere Pro over Dynamic Link is restricted to one process, whereas the main After Effects application can use multiple processes simultaneously.

     

    Why is this exactly? I've never gotten a good answer for this. Is this going to be fixed in future releases?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 9, 2013 4:47 PM   in reply to cfg_2451

    Because you wouldn't want After Effects to take over all resources from Premiere Pro when you are working primarily in Premiere Pro and just using After Effects as a helper application through Dynamic Link.

     

    If you need the performance from After Effects, then render out of the primary After Effects application and use the result in Premiere Pro.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2013 3:06 PM   in reply to Todd_Kopriva

    Todd_Kopriva wrote:

     

    Because you wouldn't want After Effects to take over all resources from Premiere Pro when you are working primarily in Premiere Pro and just using After Effects as a helper application through Dynamic Link.

    But I primarly see this when I'm exporting via AME. This pulls in not only PPro, but also AE, etc., all through DL. And everything comes to a halt whenever a lower third shows up to be rendered, because AE serializes the process. So my eight core processor becomes a one core processor until that seven seconds or so of footage goes by. And that, is silly. Sorry to have to call it what it is. And it's a serious performance problems that Adobe should address and fix. Truly.

     

    I guess my "real" question is, why is this an Abobe problem in the first place? This is, or at least should be, an OS resource allocation and scheduling problem. Same as memory allocation should be handled by the OS's Virtual Memory system and not by Adobe. I was taught that problems like this were the whole point behind the a multi-tasking scheduler.  Yeah, I know -- back then we had Unix and VMS, and today we have Windows and OSX. This is... progress?

     
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