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3D Extrude and Bevel, Isometric vertical paths not vertical

Feb 12, 2013 1:19 PM

Tags: #problem #help #adobe #3d #bevel #path #tool #extrude #isometric

While using the 3D extrude and bevel tool, specifically the isometric preset from the position drop down menu. I am noticing that when I expand  the shape (in this case a perfect cube), the vertical paths are not exactly perfect, and are not truly vertical, but off slightly. Is this something that can be fixed or adjusted in the settings, or is this how the tool works?

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 12, 2013 2:44 PM   in reply to ADDeR_0n3

    The angles will be  off a very small amount when you expand appearance of the default. I thought the math might be slightly off for the default 3 values, but even if you make 2 of the settings 0 degrees you will still get not perfectly perpindicullines.

     

    This is easily fixed though selecting points with the hollow arrow tool and doing object >> path >> average

     
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    Feb 12, 2013 5:02 PM   in reply to ADDeR_0n3

    3D Effect doesn't really do isometric (parallel perspective, or orthographic projection). It only approximates it by using a very distant perspective.

     

    Draw a cube with it set to "isometric" and you'll also find that the left and right edges are not angled at exactly 30 and 150 degrees.

    is not negligible, either; not when you need to "build" illustrations of multiple objects.

     

     

     

    JET

     
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    Feb 12, 2013 8:56 PM   in reply to ADDeR_0n3

    Well, not to spell out the obvious: Since isometric drawing means just skewing shapes around, in most cases drawing such stuff conventionally using normal blends or angled gradient fills is much more efficient... Using the effects in this scenario strikes me as not the most efficient way to go about the matter...

     

    Mylenium

     
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    Feb 13, 2013 5:27 AM   in reply to Mylenium

    Since isometric drawing means just skewing shapes around...

     

    Isometric drawing is far more than "just skewing shapes around."

     

    in most cases drawing such stuff conventionally using normal blends or angled gradient fills is much more efficient...

     

    Depends entirely upon what you're drawing. Many subjects are more expedient to draw/shade with 3D Effect than to construct manually.

     

     

     

    JET

     
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