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Currently Being Moderated

New to rendering in DVD format.

Feb 14, 2013 2:25 PM

Tags: #video #render #dvd

OK, been doing Photography, and Videos for You Tube for Years now. No problem.

 

I use PE9.

 

I decided to make a Documentary and burn it on a DVD [to also later have a Co. make copies / have not started yet]

 

The camera is a SonyHXR NX 30.

 

This is what I understand so far, please correct me if I am wrong or have the solutions.

 

 

I need to "shoot" DVD format size which is 720x480 Correct ?

 

However, which format? HD MPEG4/AVC/H.264 AVCHD (version 2.0 compatible)
OR                                   STD MPE-G2 PS [I think this is the one]

 

The first problem is the camera's smallest format is SD:720x576 (9Mbps 16:9)

 

Will this be the setting I need to use?

 

The Audio will not be a problem as DVD makers need PCM/WAV which the camera has a setting for.

 

Now, edited as I get my files from the laptop [not the camera], time to render. [share]

 

I have choices seems like.

 

One, being, burn a DVD BUT, the preset does not give me the choice in the Audio as PCM, only Dolby and that is not going to work for DVD's.
Is there a way to change that preset? to PCM?

 

My other choice then is

Two, "Computer" MPEG to play back on a Computer or Burn a DVD.
If so, should I pick HD720 25? It again does not say PCM for the Audio.

Just checked advanced settings. AUDIO can be MPEG, would that be the same as PCM?

 

Well, I hope all this makes sense and I would so much appreciate if someone would have the answers.

 

Thank You.

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 14, 2013 2:42 PM   in reply to beemerchef

    OK, there are some corrections to the above.

     

    For DV material, in PAL (determined by where one lives, and the settings on their camera, the Frame Size will be 720 x 576. The difference between Standard 4:3 and Widescreen 16:9, will be determined by the settings on the camera, when the material was recorded, and will be a difference between the PAR (Pixel Aspect Ratio). The Frame Size will be the same.

     

    For DVD-Video, there is ONLY one Encoding, that is allowed - MPEG-2 DVD.

     

    The Primary Audio Stream can be either PCM/WAV, or DD AC3. On a DVD-Video, one can also have supplemental Audio Streams, say DD 5.1 SS, DTS, etc., but ONLY as supplemental Audio Streams. PrE does not do DD 5.1 SS, or DTS Encoding, and also lacks the authoring capabilities to add Supplemental Audio to the DVD-Video.

     

    In PAL-land, MPEG Audio is also allowed for the Primary Audio Stream, but is not being used much anymore, and has fallen into disfavor, as there are several potential problems with that Audio Encoding. I would advise NOT using it, and do not know if PrE even offers that as an Audio option.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 14, 2013 2:43 PM   in reply to beemerchef

    As long as you shoot with a camcorder, it doesn't matter if you shoot in standard definition or high-definition. You can get a DVD either way.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 14, 2013 4:32 PM   in reply to beemerchef

    Yes, we are in the USA so that would be PAL.

    Actually, that would be NTSC, and not PAL. If your camera is producing 720 x 576, then it must either be a PAL model, or set to PAL. NTSC will always be 720 x 480, and for Standard 4:3 the PAR will be 0.9, and for Widescreen 16:9, PAR will be 1.2. The PAR's are slightly different for PAL footage.

     

    In NTSC-land (the US, for instance), MPEG Audio is not an option.

     

    If you are going to a replication house, and they require PCM/WAV (really as good as it gets), then you might have to use another authoring application, like Sony's DVD Architect, to specify that Encoding. It appears that PrE ONLY offers DD AC3 (one of the two NTSC Audio standards), for the DVD. [I just found that out, because of your thread. I use Adobe Encore for my authoring, and it allows me to specify the Audio Encoding.]

     

    As for 1920 x 1080, that will be HD (High Def) material, which CAN be down-rezzed to SD (Standard Def), or used to burn a BD (Blu-ray Disc), which WILL be HD.

     

    Still curious about the 720 x 576 material. I do not know GoPro cameras, so it might just be a setting between PAL & NTSC.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 15, 2013 7:48 AM   in reply to beemerchef

    Now it appears that Mr. Spirit IS a happy guy. Thanks for sharing.

     

    When starting with HD (High Def), but going ultimately to SD (Standard Def) for a DVD-Video, one workflow would be to set up an HD Project to match that GoPro footage, and Import and edit that. When done, just Export/Share/Publish to a DV-AVI, which will then be Imported into a SD DV Project for authoring (Menus and navigation added at that point), and either Burn to Disc (DVD-Video), or Burn to Folder (VIDEO_TS folder with the IFO, BUP and VOB files inside). You can always Open that original HD Project, and author a BD (Blu-ray Disc) from that, so nothing lost. Also, from that HD Project, you can Export/Share/Publish to HD for use on YouTube, Vimeo, etc. The only downside is that it will take a little longer to output that DV-AVI for use in the SD DVD-Video Project.

     

    As for the Audio, I do not think (unless it has been added) that PrE will let you do PCM/WAV. For that, you will probably want to explore Sony's DVD Architect. We are fortunate to have Steve Grisetti, our tireless MOD here, who has "written the book" on DVD Architect. There is also a forum on Muvipix.com (co-founded by Steve G.), that covers DVD Architect, and were I looking into that program, it would be the first place that I would go. There will be a lot of great reading there, with many questions already answered. Also, the folk at Muvipix.com are very friendly, helpful, and ready to answer any questions about using that program. It offers many more features, when authoring, than does PrE, whick is fairly limited and very linear, in what it can do.

     

    PCM/WAV is the better format for Audio, as it is uncompressed, unlike DD (Dolby Digital) AC3 (a flavor of MPEG, but a special one), which IS compressed. I assume that Adobe decided on the AC3 only Audio, as it is compressed, so takes up less room on a DVD-Video, allowing for more, or higher Bit-Rate Video. Adobe's full-featured authoring app., Encore, can do either, but it's only available as part of Premiere Pro.

     

    I use AC3, because it allows me to do DD 5.1 SS (Surround Sound), when authoring in Encore. However, if ultimate Audio fidelity is needed, then I include a PCM/WAV Stereo version, as a supplemental Audio Stream (something that PrE cannot do).

     

    When you speak with the replication house, be sure to get the full specs. on what they require, and how they need for you to provide that. Once, a replication house needed a DLT tape, with all authoring done. Now, many will take a "master DVD-Video disc," and work from that. That makes replication easier on the person supplying the master, as they no longer need a DLT tape machine (fairly expensive). Each replication house might have their own specs., and you want to provide the material exactly as they require.

     

    Good luck, and happy editing,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 15, 2013 8:19 AM   in reply to beemerchef

    You'll find my free 3 part Basic Training tutorials for DVD Architec here.

    http://muvipix.com/products.php?searchphrase=dvd+architect&btn.x=0&btn .y=0

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 15, 2013 10:00 AM   in reply to beemerchef

    Ara,

     

    Thank you for reporting on the inclusion of the PCM/WAV Audio, and glad that you found that setting.

     

    I am also glad that Diskmakers is so easy to work with. Nice to find suppliers, who are helpful and ready to work with the client. It was not always the way with replication houses, but that seems to be changing, as more "casual users" avail themselves of their services.

     

    Good luck and safe motoring,

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - going back some years, there was a Harley-rider in Colorado Springs, who had a rig on the back, for his Bulldog. I had seen their photographs in some magazine, and then one day, got to meet them both in the Springs. The Bulldog (probably long gone by now), rode with goggles and leathers, looking over his "master's" shoulders. They were a sight to behold out on I-25. I cannot imagine getting any of my Bulldogs to wear goggles, as they even resist wearing their coats on cold days. Maybe it's just MY Bulldogs? I looked for one of those older pics, but never found one via Google. Several other Bulldogs on motorcycles, but not that one.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 22, 2013 12:17 PM   in reply to beemerchef

    First, let's address the black bars. When one drags a Clip onto the Timeline (properties for Timeline are set with the choices in New Project), with Scale to Frame Size OFF *, and there are black bars, then there is a mis-match between the Clips, and the Project's settings. It could be the Frame Size, or perhaps a mis-match between the PAR's (Pixel Aspect Ratio) of the Clips, and the Project. In PrE 11, it has become easier, as the Project can be automatically and dynamically adjusted to match the Source Footage - just drag the first Clip to the Timeline, and it will adjust to accommodate it. With earlier versions, it's best to jot down the Frame Size, FPS and any PAR, should that not be 1.0, or Square Pixels, which all HD material, with the exception of 1440 x 1080 Anamorphic. Then, at New Project, choose the Preset that matches that Source Material, as close, as is possible, with 100% being ideal.

     

    Steve Grisetti has a Basic Training Series, and Part 1 covers the Project Setup. I am linking to his Basic Training CLASSIC Series, as his new one is for PrE 11, and there have been some changes - one mentioned above: http://www.muvipix.com/products.php?subcat_id=44

     

    Hope that helps, and gets you started on the right foot.

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - Glad that there is following for Spirit, and other pups on motorbikes. I tend to look for English Bulldogs doing almost anything.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 23, 2013 8:16 AM   in reply to beemerchef

    If you are truly looking for a resource that will answer all of these questions and more, you should check out my books.

     

    Here's one for version 10.

    http://Muvipix.com/pe10.php

     

    And here's one for version 11.

    http://Muvipix.com/pe11.php

     

    As you can see, we publish both a color book for Premiere Elements and a black & white book for both Premiere Elements and Photoshop Elements together -- and we've been doing this since version 7.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 24, 2013 6:24 AM   in reply to beemerchef

    Not even remotely. Sorry. I'm just a freelance writer and co-founder of Premiere Elements support site http://Muvipix.com.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 24, 2013 8:58 AM   in reply to beemerchef

    The very few, around here, who ARE affiliated with Adobe will have a "Staff" badge in their Profiles.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 26, 2013 7:41 AM   in reply to beemerchef

    Ara,

     

    Of the various books that I have seen, I can give a positive recommendation for Steve Grisetti's Muvipix Guide to PrE 11.

     

    I think that you will find that many, if not most, of the technical aspects of the program in the Appendix. The body of the book covers the program, and its operation in great detail. If I were to buy only one, that would be the one.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     
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