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AVCHD - how can I extract and save separate clips?

Feb 15, 2013 12:57 PM

My first go around with AVCHD which I know nothing about except that after buying a nice new Sony video camera I have as a result on my first try-out, a single file called AVCHD even though I took several separate clips. When I click on that file on my computer, it opens up and shows thumbnails of each of the separate clips. When I click on one of the clips it opens in QuickTime and from there I can export the file to save it as a separate clip on my computer.

 

Is there an easier way to batch save the separate clips or do I need to go through this process of opening each one separately in QuickTime and exporting it in order to save it?

 

Any information on how I should approach working with this AVCHD format would also be greatly appreciated.

 

TIA,

Ken

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 15, 2013 12:58 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    You on a Mac?

     
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    Feb 15, 2013 12:59 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    You should have seperate clips. There should not be a file called AVCHD, only a folder on your media. Search AVCHD workflow to import and edit properly. Quicktime should be left out of the equation for Premiere.

     

    Good Luck.

     
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    Feb 15, 2013 1:14 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    Copy entire AVCHD file from your card  to your local hard drive ( not C;)

     

    Open Premiere Pro.

     

    Go to the Media Browser Panel

     

    Locate your Source footage on the local hard drive directory.

     

    Click down to the individual source clips.  Where varies a little depending on camera  but eg. VideoStream

     

    Import into Premiere.  ( one way..Drag them to a Folder in the Project Window eg "Holiday Clips"

     
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    Feb 17, 2013 3:11 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    OK.

     

    Mac OS recently mucked this up.  It no longer sees them properly as a bunch of folders as files (as any good file manager should), rather it seems them as a QuickTime package.  You have to 'open the package' as it were to get at the files inside.

     
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    Feb 17, 2013 6:19 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    I have no problem with that and planned on continuing that way as I don't want to rely on Premiere to handle my original files - Only after I have previewed them outside of Premiere and decided which one's I want to include in any specific project. I keep specific projects 'whole' and 'isolated' as 'stand-alone' and 'complete' in respective folders.

     

    I am not exactly sure what you are trying to do here... but it sounds wrong and I think you have a misunderstanding of the work flow and NLEs!

     

    I am not sure also about Jims advice ...although I am sure he is right...but I think he is advising you about something else.  ie not the ingesting of the source files into Premiere (Project Bins)

     

    Premiere is a non destructive editor.  It wont harm your source files by working "with " them.

     

    Keep all your source files exactly how they came of the card ( camera card) on your local hard drive.

     

    THey will be individual files in side Premiere.

     

    Dont mess around trawling through them, viewing them  in an external player and sorting them..  You will bust something!

     

    The place to sort your files is in the Bins in a Premiere Project. 

     

    Basically...Edit in the editing Application.   (Premiere)

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 8:42 AM   in reply to Ken Nielsen
    I don't consider this arrangement to be 'mucked up' at all

     

    What I mean is that a file manager, which Finder is, should be showing you the folders and files exactly as they are.  That's what a file manager does.

     

     

    I wish there were a way to extract all of the files in the AVCHD or 'Private' file

     

    That's generally a bad idea.  Like Craig says, you should be keeping the Private folder intact and unaltered.  The media will usually work better that way.

     

    If you want a way to see the individual clips outside of PP more easily, talk to Apple and get them to fix Finder so it works correctly.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 10:52 AM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    There is no chance Apple will do this.  Forgedaboutit.

     

    You dont need to use the QT player at all in your Premiere editing workflow  is the advice that Jim and I are telling you.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 3:31 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    A Project refers to your source files only by name and location.  It "points" at the files to be used in the edit.

     

    Importing / Ingesting the files into your Project only tells Premiere where the files are in the system.

     

    It does not import the actual physical  file and it is non destructive.  It does not harm the file.

     

    Any number of projects can "reference" exactlty the same files and any singler project can reference that file multiple times even though it only appears once in the Project Bin.

     

     

    This is the same for any NLE.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 3:42 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    What if I need clips from the AVCHD file that are now open in a project in Premiere, brought into other projects? Do I need to open the same AVCHD file again in each project to sort out which clips belong to which project?

     

    As ShooterNZ says, all you have is a link to Asset (your AVCHD in this case). It can be used in multiple Projects, and you will just Import it into each. Also covered by ShooterNZ, you can any number (might be a limit up there somewhere?) of Instances of that file, and each can have different In & Out Points.

     

    As an example, I have an AVI file titled "The End," with some intricate animations. I have used it 100's of times, in different Projects. One thing that I do, related to such Assets is to Copy those to a folder structure within my Project's folder structure. That allows me to work with the Assets, but not touch my "originals," but only Copies. I do that for all Assets in a Project, so cleanup is easy. The one downside is that if I have the Project on, say my G:\ drive, with Copies of all Assets in sub-folders below it, I do give up some performance vs splitting things over multiple HDD's. If I feel the need to go for the improved performance, and some times I do, then I will create a "root folder" [Project Name] on each HDD, and create appropriate sub-folders below that. Then cleanup is a bit more complicated, but with all Assets under that [Project name] root, I just navigate to it, on each HDD, and Delete it, taking all those Copies, etc. with it. For me, it pays to spend an hour in contemplation on how I wish to work on a Project, then set it up, so that things work best for me.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Hunt

     

    PS - for a bit of background on what is contained IN a Project Files (PRPROJ in this case), see this article: http://forums.adobe.com/message/3392837#3392837

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 4:09 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    I will keep a separate hard drive (a really fast one) as the place to store my original files taken from the camera. Those files will be stored each in folders with the shooting date and the subject as a refeence in the folder name. This way, I can catalog what I have to work with and be able to navigate to it easily when a new project comes up where I want to use certain clips that already exist.

     

    Absolutely right and correct for an efficient workflow and for storage / archive.

     

    FWIW: I copy the scrd from a shoot to an External Hard Drive (Permanent archive and backup) and I copy same to internal local drive for editing.

     

    Foder Naming protocol is Job name_Day/Date_Rushes.

     

    Becareful  not to put AVCHD files from different cards in same folder. THey may overwrite. 

    Separate Rushes folder for every card - Important at many levels.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 4:42 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    I will keep a separate hard drive (a really fast one) as the place to store my original files taken from the camera.

     

    That's a good plan, but only half way there.  As tapeless media have no tape for backup, you should seriously consider using two hard drives, an internal drive for editing, and an external for backup.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 5:29 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 9:45 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    Welcome to the wonderful world of tapeless media.  It has it's flaws, but this is how it works.  If you don't like it, write to Sony and Panasonic who invented AVCHD and complain.  (I did.)  If we're lucky, the next iteration of AVC-Ultra won't be so stupid.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 10:03 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    You guys, you can't be serious. Why should I triple the amount of work I have to do under near impossible conditions?

     

    What does this even mean?

     

    Its you thats trying to do things in an odd  and in efficient way based on editing workflow ignorance or inexperience.

     

    Forget about double clicking and opening individual files!

    Forget about renaming files.  Use the Data fields

     

    Simply

    Go thru  your "rushes" in the Source Monitor or the mini monitor in the bin

    Enter and log  info in the data column. eg Description..if you wish.. 

    Create a Select Takess Bin and drag the stuff you want in there ..if you wish.

     

    Get organised in the NLE ( Premiere) Thats how editors and their assistants work.

     

     

     

    Where Am I missing the fun part?

     

    Ken

     

    You have not understood any part of this or any advice  it seems.

     

    You are totally over thinking it and not understood the digital  workflow  or how an NLE works.

     

    You are finding issues before you have done tutorials (homework)  or worked out why the rest of us do not have the  same issues.

     

    Not sure you were ready for the digital world when you got a new camera!

     

    Do some basic tutorials.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 18, 2013 10:09 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    Well, at least I'm not alone. Thanks Jim. At least, if I save the clips outside of the application as I have been doing, I can name the clip's filename.

     

     

    Jim has an issue in that regard but it is not the same as what you are discussing. eg a problem with Premiere.

     

    Jims issue does not describe workflow or the way it works in Premiere.( Its a fixed paradigm issue come down from the  world of tape and digitising)

     

     

    @ you..  THere is no need to re name clips in the digital tapeless editing world .  You said ..

     

    Why should I triple the amount of work.

     

    Re naming clips would  do that ..with no benefit.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 10:12 PM   in reply to shooternz

    Well...I can see the benefit myself, were the AVCHD spec properly designed to put everything in one MXF file recording to NTFS cards.

     

    It's our loss that it wasn't.

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 10:37 PM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Maybe .

     

    Meantime you have confused the O.P. and got no where by ..

     

    write to Sony and Panasonic who invented AVCHD and complain. (I did.) If we're lucky, the next iteration of AVC-Ultra won't be so stupid.

     

    Classic Jim ( how did they respond?)

     

    ...and no one else seems to have issue with how it works..

     

    Simplest management  of data seems to work absolutely fine in my world.   Never been easier IMHO

     
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    Feb 18, 2013 10:48 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    Ken

     

    Original Source Files go  into a "Bin" in your Premiere Project Window.

     

    Create and Name the Bin whatever you want. ( A bin is simply a folder with a fancy name that relates to film editing.)

     

    I call  Bins - Rushes Day one or Card one or anything that ids the footage conveniently.  Rushes is a word that also comes from the days of "film" ( like me)

     

    Once in the bin...all the clips can be viewed in the mini monitor.  Select Clip> Space Bar

     

    THey can also be  dragged to the Source Monitor and played ( Space Bar or scrub)

     

    Besides every clip in the Bin is a number of columns for the editor to enter info they may wish to sort on or search on.

     

    Create and name other bins as you wish but  an obvous one is "Selected Takes"  - takes is a word from the days of film ( like me and every pro editor in the world)

     

    Drag whatever clips you want into what ever bins you want to use.

     

    THese bins are only relevant in Premiere.  ( Non destructive and not affecting your source files on your hard drives)

     
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    Feb 19, 2013 3:56 AM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    Also try a different workspace (or create one of your own).  The metalogging workspace works well for initial previewing of footage and data entry.

     

    Jeff

     
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    Feb 19, 2013 9:31 AM   in reply to shooternz

    ( how did they respond?)

     

    You know they didn't.

     

    The point of that comment is to show first, my own frustration, but more importantly to engender resignation of the OPs intended course and acceptance of the way things work.  (Which it seems you agree with.)

     

     

    ...and no one else seems to have issue with how it works..

     

    Clearly the OP did, wanting to do things we normally did with tape based media, but can't do with tapeless due to it's poor design.

     
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    Feb 19, 2013 11:21 AM   in reply to Jim Simon

    Moving to a tapeless workflow required a paradigm shift ...and I had no issue doing so.

     

    I and my colleagues in other facilties we work with ...do not  have a single issue with it .

     
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    Feb 19, 2013 2:01 PM   in reply to shooternz

    I and my colleagues in other facilties we work with ...do not  have a single issue with it .

     

    That's great for you guys.  Not everyone agrees.  Take Aaron in the following thread.

     

    http://forums.adobe.com/message/5086143?tstart=0#5086143

     

    How easy it would be for him and others with a similar work flow if all data were contained in a single clip with a unique name.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 4, 2013 11:14 PM   in reply to Ken Nielsen

    Not sure that it has been mentioned here, but the Projrect panel is a lot easier to work with if you enlarge it temporarily.

     

    Do this, without messing up your regular workspace by clicking inside the panel, then hit the apostrophe key - at least it is that key on a UK keyboard - and the Project panel will become full screen.  Hit ' again to go back to normal.

     
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