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Packaging links and fonts

Feb 16, 2013 9:21 AM

Tags: #packaging_fonts_and_links

I'm using InDesign CS6 on a MacPro with a Mountain Lion operating system. Basic preflighting shows no errors (including links and fonts) but InDesign stalls in the packaging process, saying that it can't package the necessary links. How do I troubleshoot this?. I need a package of  a 32-page newsletter for offset printing by a commercial printing company. Another option. Can I use a high-resolution PDF (press) without loss in quality? Neil at news@mnn.net

 
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 16, 2013 9:32 AM   in reply to neilwiley

    PDF would be the preferred option to almost any modern printer. I can't imagine anyone wanting native files in this day and age.

     

    Bob

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 19, 2013 2:48 AM   in reply to neilwiley

    In this case you need to run by a divide and rule policy and isolating a problematic link or page. Divide your 32-paged document into 16-16 and then try to run the File > Package command. See if you get any error in both or in one of the processes. If you get error on both, then try divide the 16 paged into 8 - 8 pages and then try to isolate the issue.

     

    For a hi-res press quality, you can change the job options of Press by changing the downsampling of images to "Do not downsample" and compressions to none which you'll find in the Compression section of PDF export window.

     
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    Feb 19, 2013 4:11 AM   in reply to neilwiley

    Only Curious: What has the printer to do with the original file?

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 19, 2013 6:22 AM   in reply to Bob Levine

    "PDF would be the preferred option to almost any modern printer. I can't imagine anyone wanting native files in this day and age."

    Not necessarily. There are a few advantages to sending the native files, along with a PDF for reference, as many agencies, large and small continue to do. The ability to make last minute changes is important. A file might originate at an agency or designer, get approved by marketing, legal, and the boss, then get sent to the printer. Last minute changes could be requested by anyone, to have the agency make the revisions and send a new final PDF in not always the most efficient work flow. Full service printers do this work every day, saving time and money for their customers.

    InDesign is a complex program, and some users are not full-time InDesign experts, and/or they might not be completely up to date on printing requirements. These people are able to make a file that looks pretty good at 3 feet, but is hardly print ready. So the printer receives a "print ready" PDF full of errors and problems, sighs, and thinks to him/herself, it blows but it goes. This person would be better advised to send the native files, along with their PDF. Even the best experts make mistakes and typos.

    You may be old enough to remember when printing was a craft, when each craftsman who touched the job did their best to improve and attempt to perfect the final piece. We're not dead yet.

    Lastly, printers are constantly expected to edit supplied PDFs, there are many reasons for this, but the most common is probably because the person who sent the PDF does not want to ask the person who created it to make additional changes (it's cheaper to let the printer do it). These clients now expect the printer to edit their PDFs, often not a problem, always easier with the native files.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 19, 2013 9:16 AM   in reply to Luke Jennings

    Luke Jennings schrieb:

     

    Not necessarily. There are a few advantages to sending the native files, along with a PDF for reference, as many agencies, large and small continue to do. The ability to make last minute changes is important. A file might originate at an agency or designer, get approved by marketing, legal, and the boss, then get sent to the printer. Last minute changes could be requested by anyone, to have the agency make the revisions and send a new final PDF in not always the most efficient work flow. Full service printers do this work every day, saving time and money for their customers.

    Problem here is: The printer does not get "my" native InDesign file, he gets also files from other versions of InDesign, Quark Xpress, FrameMaker, Scribus and a lot of other programs on the market. If I give someone an open file I must be sure that he can handle the program professionally. I doubt that he can do it as I do who is working many hours a week with the same program (but with different versions).

     

    Luke Jennings schrieb:

    InDesign is a complex program, and some users are not full-time InDesign experts, and/or they might not be completely up to date on printing requirements. These people are able to make a file that looks pretty good at 3 feet, but is hardly print ready. …

    Sorry, exactly that is a big problem: the printers canot be neither experts in a lot of programs. E. g. I know cases when the user was working intendently with rgb images and the printer converted all images in Photoshop to cmyk. Not very professional.

    Or are you sure that the printer is not using HIS user dictionary but the embedded one? Are you sure that the printer has the same third party plugins installed as I had when I made the file?

    I live in Germany and make a lot of file for Germany and Austria. So I have bought the Duden Language Package which gives me much better hyphenation than the InDesign-native one. It also provides me with Austro-German Language (it is German but some words are different like hier/hie, hiermit/hiemit, Gleise/Geleise, Küken/Kücken, siebter/siebenter and many others). I had never met a printer who has also put money on extra dictionaries. Missing dictionariy means when the text is edited the text will reflow.

     

    Luke Jennings schrieb:

     

    Lastly, printers are constantly expected to edit supplied PDFs, there are many reasons for this, but the most common is probably because the person who sent the PDF does not want to ask the person who created it to make additional changes (it's cheaper to let the printer do it). These clients now expect the printer to edit their PDFs, often not a problem, always easier with the native files.

    No, I don't expect the printer to edit anything. And if someone else had created the file he has to change it, because you get into the rights of the creator. And yes, he has the right to be paid if his creation is altered.

    Clients who expect easy changes in a file have no clue what can happen when the file is opened on another computer with another version on another operating system etc.

     

    And how will you handle fonts? You cannot give away your fonts to a printer. And if the printer is required to buy all used fonts he will charge you for the fonts too and I doubt that this is resulting in a cheaper procedure than if the designer makes the changes.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 19, 2013 11:57 AM   in reply to Willi Adelberger

    "Problem here is: The printer does not get "my" native InDesign file"

    If you package it he will, full service printers maintain current as well as earlier versions of InDesign and many other programs.

    "Sorry, exactly that is a big problem: the printers canot be neither experts in a lot of programs."

    Why not?

    "No, I don't expect the printer to edit anything. And if someone else had created the file he has to change it, because you get into the rights of the creator. And yes, he has the right to be paid if his creation is altered."

    You don't expect the printer to edit your PDF, but many do. I agree the creator of a design should retain the rights and be paid for any changes, perhaps in a perfect world.

    "And how will you handle fonts? You cannot give away your fonts to a printer."

    Fonts are included in the InDesign package (usually), for output only. I don't think this violates your font license, but this may vary by location, at any rate this has been common practice for decades.

     

    I'm not saying it's wrong to send a print ready PDF, I'm saying it's not right for everybody.

    If you are sure your file is perfect, and there won't be any last minute changes, send a PDF only.

    If you not sure, send a PDF and the packaged native files.

     
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  • Currently Being Moderated
    Feb 19, 2013 12:35 PM   in reply to Luke Jennings

    Luke Jennings wrote:

     

    ...Fonts are included in the InDesign package (usually), for output only. I don't think this violates your font license, but this may vary by location, at any rate this has been common practice for decades.

    ...

     

    On behalf of Adobe Systems Incorporated ...

     

    This statement about fonts is a very dangerous generalization. The fact that many designers and printers (didn't say all or even a majority) have blatantly violated font licenses over the years is not an excuse to continue doing so. The fact is that for virtually all font libraries that I am aware of including the entire Adobe Type Library, it is absolutely not true that simply because you can package fonts with InDesign that it is legal for the fonts to be sent to and used by the print service provider. In the case of the Adobe Type Library, the only condition under which such fonts may be sent to a print service provider is if and only if the print service provider is also licensed for the fonts in question. Typically and in practical terms, this means that the print service provider has licenses for the fonts via a license for the Adobe Font Folio.

     

         - Dov

     
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