Skip navigation
Keytime Objective
Currently Being Moderated

Photoshop File Transferred to Illustrator

Mar 7, 2013 8:34 AM

Tags: #illustrator #psd #vector_file #editable_vector_file

Hi,


I have created a CD design in Photoshop and exported this to Illustrator. However, the supplier needs the design to be an editable vector file?


Anybody know how to do this? I sent the supplier a JPEG file which I had imported into Illustrator but they said that was wrong?

 

HELP!

 

 

 

I

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2013 8:45 AM   in reply to Keytime Objective

    "The supplier"?  Do you mean the print vendor?  If you do, they should not have a problem with a bitmap file.  Requiring an editable Illustrator file could be part of their workflow, but something does not make sense with their requirement.  Unless they need to cut the label out of the media, It's confusing what they are after.  What about an Illustrator editable PDF?  Give us their prepress checklist.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2013 10:04 AM   in reply to Keytime Objective

    John, there are two kinds of graphics; raster and vector.

     

    The Photoshop image is raster, that is, it's pixel based and subject to resolution, (pixels per inch). Importing it to Illustrator doesn't change that.

     

    Illustrator is a vector drawing application. Vector graphics are composed of mathematically defined objects, and are resolution-independent.

     

    It sounds like the vendor is demanding vector graphics, although they aren't being clear about why that's the case. The phrase "editable for print" is somewhat erroneous.

     

    You need to ask them about the output method. Is this something they'll be printing on the disk itself? If so, it's possible their process does indeed require a vector graphic.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2013 11:03 AM   in reply to John Mensinger

    Right.  My point is a bitmap file could work.  And, aside from that, an editable Illustartor file can "contain" a bitmap file.  The advantage is the vendor can manipulate the file, assign a production run number, use customer generated trim marks and a die-cut vector path to a vector file.  Perhaps the supplier can supply the post a vector based template file?

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2013 2:03 AM   in reply to Keytime Objective

    Probably you will have to do that. It depends on the graphic you created and how you created it. But without even knowing the artwork you delivered and the exact specifications needed for the job, no one will be able to tell.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2013 2:17 AM   in reply to Monika Gause

    If this CD cover looks anything like David Smith's recent design for a John Mayer CD, £60 to redraw it in Illy is a bargain! (http://vimeo.com/60647216)

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2013 5:00 AM   in reply to Keytime Objective

    You should speak directly to the printer to find out what their problem is. I suspect you have been giving them a file with a rastered dieline and/or type. The rastered dieline would be difficult to remove or edit and rastered type simply looks bad. If your Photoshop design has live type, save your Photoshop file as a Photoshop PDF, the type will stay vector, which you want. Place this PDF into Illustrator and add any dieline or other elements you need, preferably on a new layer. Save the Illustrator file as a PDF.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2013 7:36 AM   in reply to Keytime Objective

    OK, are you making a round label for a CD, or the liner that goes into a jewel case? You can probably find a vector template somewhere, but it's pretty easy to make one from your existing jpeg template.

    Create a new Illustrator file, with bleed, to the size of the template. place your template into Illustrator. Make a new layer and call it Template. Go to the swatches panel and create a new spot color, call it Dieline and make it 100% magenta. Use the Pen tool, Line tool, or shape tool to recreate the lines on the original template in the Dieline stroke color, no fill. Make the lines .5pt wide. Hide or delete the layer with the placed jpeg, lock the new Template layer, place your Photoshop PDF and position to the template. Save as a PDF.

    Open your PDF in Acrobat and confirm the Dieline layer is not knocking-out the art (Output Preview, turn the Dieline color on and off) and everything looks as expected. If you can post a screen shot, perhaps someone will provide more tips.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2013 7:45 AM   in reply to Keytime Objective

    If your jpeg template is still in your file, they won't be happy. If you follow my instructions in post 11 and save as an Illustrator file at the end, all will be good.

     
    |
    Mark as:
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 8, 2013 8:08 AM   in reply to Keytime Objective

    For my part, you are welcome, you can use the camera icon to post a screen shot.

     
    |
    Mark as:

More Like This

  • Retrieving data ...

Bookmarked By (0)

Answers + Points = Status

  • 10 points awarded for Correct Answers
  • 5 points awarded for Helpful Answers
  • 10,000+ points
  • 1,001-10,000 points
  • 501-1,000 points
  • 5-500 points