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Premiere Pro CS6 vs. After Effects CS6

Mar 7, 2013 1:06 PM

I would like to know which of these programs would be best for me.   I shoot video with my Canon Vixia HFS 20 HD camcorder.  I have a decent green screen studio set up in my basement.  I currently use Corel VideoStudio Pro X3 and am not happy with the poor chroma key features it has.  Is the Chroma key the same or similar on both of these programs?  I would rather spend less for Premiere Pro unless there is some really cool stuff in After Effects that would make the additional cost worth it. 

 

I just bought a new Dell XPS 8500 desktop with a Core i7 processor, 12GB of RAM, Nvidia GeForce GT 640 1GB GDDR5, 460 watt power supply, Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit and a 2TB hard drive.  I just installed a WD Black 2TB internal second hard drive.  I would be willing to upgrade the graphics card and/or RAM if it would make a noticeable difference.

 

I would really like some good advice on what to buy and suggestions of computer upgrades if needed.

 

Dan Hauck

 
Replies
  • Currently Being Moderated
    Mar 7, 2013 2:41 PM   in reply to HD VID Dan

    Get the Creative Cloud.  For $50/month, you get both PP and AE, plus nearly every other program Adobe makes.  You also get new features as soon as they're available, instead of waiting for a new version to come out.

     
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    Mar 7, 2013 10:52 PM   in reply to HD VID Dan

    Both programs have good chroma keying. In Premiere Pro it is Ultra Key and in After Effects it is Keylight. Both work just fine.

     

    I would be inclined to point you toward a video editor - Premiere Pro - rather than a special effects program - After Effects - if you only get one.

     

    However, if you are happy editing with Corel, then After Effects might be the way to go. You don't get the integration you have between Premiere Pro and After Effects but you can still do keying and create great titles and animation in After Effects and then assemble the edit in Corel. Or try using a free editor like Lightworks. Still not as good, but free is free.

     
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    Mar 7, 2013 10:52 PM   in reply to HD VID Dan

    1. If you feel unhappy with the reply, why did you mark it as the 'correct answer'?

    That just decreases the probability some other Forum users visit your thread and give you an answer you will be more satisfied with...

     

    2. You probably misunderstands Creative Cloud Files concept. Those 20 GB are for sharing files, they don't limit you in storing and editing footages on your hard drive, and you don't have to use it.

     

    3. Both PrPro and AE have sets of keying tools that can do a decent job. However, the result always depends on many factors such as set up quality, the footage quality (it's difficult to pull a good key out of highly compressed footage) and your skills. Since AE is a compositing tool, you can pull better key there out of poor quality footage via several steps (which requires investing some time on learning).

     

    Just download trial versions of both applications and test on your own.

     

    If you're unhappy with built-in keying tools and have some money, you can extend them with 3-rd party plug-ins (e.g. Red Giant Primatte Keyer).

     
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    Mar 16, 2013 1:24 AM   in reply to HD VID Dan

    You are extremely limited in your options. Home Premium does not support more than 16 GB memory, you would need Win7 Pro to go over 16 GB. Your PSU is very limited, so it may not have the capacity for a more power hungry video card. You can not overclock, since it is a Dell. In short, leave it as it is would be my suggestion, otherwise the cost of a better PSU, another OS, extra memory and a better video card will quickly add up.

     
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    Mar 16, 2013 6:41 AM   in reply to HD VID Dan

    The GT 640 should work decent if you do the hack. A 460 Watt power supply will work just fine for a GTX 650 Ti. I think it may even work for the GTX 660 provided you have a full 460 watts. I know the GTX 650 Ti flies when using Premiere Pro :  )

     
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